With veneers of sycamore (quite white) and ebony, the marquetry cutter may produce an excellent effect on the basis of the quaint design illustrated herewith. The white on the birds and foliage may be got by incising and then rubbing in a white gesso composition, and a mixture of ordinary glue and chalk. The surface would need a very careful finish by

Marquetry Panel

Marquetry Panel

German Seventeenth Century graduated glass-papering, from coarse to fine. The elaborate design shown on pages 262-3 would afford ample scope for the abilities of an experienced marquetry worker, and, we need hardly add, is quite beyond those of the novice. The principal difficulty will be to find and fit in suitable end grain pieces to form the leaves. The flowers as well as the leaves may be made up with stained sycamore, and the water effect may be produced either by inlays of mother-of-pearl or white metal. The actual inlaying is only a secondary consideration in comparison with the work of making the panel. The work would be lessened if the grasses were omitted, and the fine lines are hardly desirable, for they could only be saw cuts filled in with composition.

When a wall-paper is soiled by any but a grease-spot, which always comes through, it is enough to put over it a spare piece of the paper, kept for the purpose. But this paper, which has been preserved rolled up in a dark closet, will have faded much less than that upon the wall; it is, therefore, necessary to expose it in sunlight until it becomes of the same general tone. If the pattern is a simple one, it is well to follow its outlines in cutting the new piece. In all cases, the edges of the piece to be applied should be scraped down with fine sandpaper, so that the outline of the patch shall not show too plainly. Nail-holes can be covered in this manner so that the repair shall be quite invisible.

Modern English Wood-carvers.