The second display by the Dress Designers' Exhibition Society, held at the Don'- Gallery from May 7 to May 25, was disappointing in the meagreness of the show of costumes. The one design by Mr. Walter Crane (worked by Miss Edith Swinhoe), which we reproduce, was the only one inviting special attention on the score of novelty. That this itself is not strikingly original

Leather Card Cases, by Miss Ethel

Leather Card Cases, by Miss Ethel.

Campbell, M.A.,

Shown at the recent Dress Designers' Exhibition.

(For treatment, see page 100.) is in its favour, for more than a very moderate degree of originality in ladies' dress intended for general wear is a bar, rather than an incentive, to its adoption. There is distinct charm in this plain red grisson dress, with its simple black linen applique on white couch with black filoselle, and finished with a black and white cord. The costume certainly was very becoming to the tall dark lady who kindly allowed herself to be photographed in it for the benefit of Arts and Crafts. We admired the gauze ball dress exhibited by Miss Rosamund F. Pulley, but chiefly because it was charmingly painted by that artist, who uses a process of her own which preserves undiminished the transparency of the colours she employs. These, by the way, we were glad to learn were not the usual aniline dyes, for such colouring is never permanent.

The card cases by Miss Ethel Campbell, M.A., reproduced herewith, were almost the only examples of embossed leather, which was surprising, considering how many articles suitable to this beautiful art may enter into a lady's costume. Even the display of fans was meagre as to quantity and uninspired in design. Indeed, only in the department of jewellery can it be said truly that there was adequate representation of any craft directly connected with the aims of the society.

In this the exhibits were numerous and for the most part excellent. Mr. Alexander Fisher sent a case of handsome jewels, in gold, silver, enamel and precious stones. The most liberal contribution was from Mr. Bernard Cuzner, of Birmingham, whose jewels are wrought and beaten qaite in the old time manner; each leaf or similar unit is a separate piece, and each article is built up from these, not, as in much modern work, saw-pierced out and filed up. He tells us that none of his jewels, we have selected for illustration, was made from a finished design rigidly adhered to, but, in each instance, "a rough sketch of the whole was made, and-the details were allowed to shape themselves under the tools." The description given under the photograph may be supplemented by a more detailed reference to a few pieces that especially pleased us.

The Dress Designers Exhibition 133

The upper pendant is a spray of beaten silver leaf work and turquoise berries, placed over a piece of fine white pearl shell, the bar holding four turquoises. The necklet is of wrought silver discs.

Jewellery, by the Barnstaple Guild oF Metal WOrkers, at the recent Dress Exhibitoin.

Jewellery, by the Barnstaple Guild oF Metal WOrkers, at the recent Dress Exhibitoin.

The Girdle is set with peacock shell and green agates: designed by H Morris; executed by Maud Partridge. The Hat-pin, of oxidised silver, set with green agates: designed and executed by Frederick Braddon. The other objects are by the same artist-craft;man. The upper Waist-clasp is of silvargent with copper insertions, set with peacock-coloured shell. The Cloak-clasp is silver and silvargent wire, set with azurites.

of leaf and scroll work, set with pearls: the large one has a rock crystal in the centre. Each of the three silver pendants of the bottom row is admirable: the left hand one is set with a large pearl blister and two turquoises; the right hand one, beautifully wrought and beaten and set with turquoises and coral beads, is based on a grape hyacinth.

By no means unworthy to rank with professional work are such articles as we have selected for illustration from the exhibit of the Camberwell

School of Arts and Crafts. The oxidized silver cloak clasp, set with amethysts, is particularly good. Our photographer, we notice by the way, has taken the chain the wrong side. As the class for jewellery was only recently started at the School, such work as is shown here is very remarkable; but it is fortunate in having in Mr. Cowell, a line craftsman, as teacher of processes. The designing is in charge of Mr. W. H. Meggs, some of whose work is included in the same exhibit.

The pieces illustrated below the cloak clasp are not by the School. The two buttons are by Mr.

Walter Brackett. The two pieces of enamel, by Mr. Albert E. Bonner, an excellent craftsman, are described elsewhere, as are also our illustrations of the highly creditable work of pupils of the Barnstaple Guild of Metal Workers.

The sales of jewellery, we are told, were fairly-good; but they should have been much better. At the low price - a few shillings - at which many really beautiful objects were catalogued, one could hardly have bought the wretched machine-made goods ordiarily sold for the same purposes.

Costume by Walter Crane. Worked by Miss Edith Swinhoe.

Costume by Walter Crane. Worked by Miss Edith Swinhoe.

Shown at the recent Dress Designers' Exhibition.

(See page 87.)

Jewellery, by the Camberwell School, of Arts and Crafts. At the Dress Designers' Exhibition.

Jewellery, by the Camberwell School, of Arts and Crafts. At the Dress Designers' Exhibition.

Pendant and Chain, silver oxidised, set with pearls and turquoises. Another, set with opals. To the left of it, a silver Button, set with chrysoprase. To the right of it, an oxidised silver Brooch, set with opal. Cidak-clasp, described in the text. (See page 88.)

Jewellery, by Albert E. Bonner: Hair Ornament (jasmine motive), green and white enamel; Necklet, pink enamel and green leaves, with opal drop and centre of flower.

Dress Buttons, by Walter Brackett.

Jewellery, by Bernard Cuzner, At the Dress Designers' Exhibition.

Jewellery, by Bernard Cuzner, At the Dress Designers' Exhibition.

The Pendant with Chain and the Necklet are described in the text, as are also the Pendants in the last row. The Pendant in the centre is of wrought and beaten silver leaf work, set with garnets. The silver Cross is set with turquoises. The Pendant to the left, based on the iris, is of beaten silver and cloisonne enamel, as is also the brooch below it. The filigree Pendant is of silver, set with a light green stone. (See page 87.)