There is so much diversity in the leaves of roses that those of each variety should be studied as carefully as the flower. Green leaves to the uninitiated are only green leaves, no matter whether they belong to a Jacqueminot or to a white rose, and yet they are very different, both in colour and in texture. Leaves of the Mermet and Bride roses, which look more or less alike, have a light, delicate, but green green, smooth surface, with the veins only slightly indicated on the upper side. In painting these in water colour, one may use aureolin and Antwerp blue (or cobalt), also Hooker's green, the highest lights being a trifle colder, with more blue and sometimes a touch of rose madder to soften the green, if too strong. In shadow the same leaves should still be green and not blackish; they may be put in with Indian yellow and cobalt or Antwerp blue, and, if necessary, a little rose madder or light red. If the veins show at all, draw them in with a little stronger tone of the same colour, and blend them off on one side into nothing. The back of the leaves is of a delicate tone of light green, for which one may use a very thin wash of cobalt or Antwerp blue, and some yellow ochre. The veins on that side, being raised, are usually the lightest part, and are to be left white; if they seem too hard that way, they may be covered with light yellow ochre later on. The shadows underneath the veins, which make them appear raised, are grey, and are put in with cobalt blue, ochre, and rose madder. The leaves of the yellow pearl rose are dark grey, or often brownish grey, with strong high lights. A good tone may be made of cobalt blue and raw sienna, with a touch of rose or brown madder. The edges are often curled under, which makes them appear darker, and they should be accentuated with a few broken touches of olive green. The backs of these leaves are very pinkish, calling for rose madder, used pure, or with a touch of cobalt, or pure thin brown madder. The veins, if a strong red, may be drawn in with crimson lake. As for the leaves of the large purplish roses like the Mrs. John Lang and the American Beauty, they, like the roses themselves, are less refined and delicate, and rather of a dull, more ordinary green, and flat and rather uninteresting in shape. They call for Indian yellow, Antwerp blue, and some light red, or for a stronger green the light red may be omitted. In the shadows olive green and Antwerp blue will be needed.

Study of Still Life (Water Colour). By Frieda Voelter Redmond.

Study of Still Life (Water Colour). By Frieda Voelter Redmond.