For the pale yellow flowers for the local tone one may use light cadmium, white and a very little ivory black to give quality, in the shadows adding raw umber and light red. For the deeper toned yellow nasturtium a deeper shade of cadmium is desirable; but if that is not to be had, yellow ochre may be combined with light cadmium and a very little madder lake added. The deep rich crimson flowers may be painted with madder lake and bone brown for the general tone, and as both colours dry slowly, a little siccatif de Courtray mixed with French poppy oil - one drop of the siccatif to five of the oil - may be added. For the green leaves, Antwerp blue, white, light cadmium, vermilion, and ivory black will be needed, with the addition of burnt sienna and vermilion in the shadows. The stems are a pale yellow green; they really need no blue, and may be painted with light cadmium, white, vermilion, and ivory black. If you chance to have in your box some light zinober green you will find it very useful for a foundation in painting both stems and leaves; but it will be necessary to qualify it with both black and red. Always add raw umber in the shadows when painting leaves or foliage.

For the background one may set one's palette with white, yellow ochre, ivory black (to be used sparingly), permanent blue and light red. For the deeper tones burnt sienna may take the place of the light red.

In Water Colours the brilliant yellow, orange, and vermilion of the flowers must be fearlessly represented, of course, by their equivalents on the palette; but, to avoid garishness, with such a riot of colour, one must be careful about putting in the half-tints and shadows. With the yellow flowers, especial pains must be taken to keep the colour pure. Wash in the general tint, leaving the white of the paper for the high lights. For the local tone of yellow mix cadmium, yellow ochre, a little rose madder or vermilion, according to the tint desired, and a touch of lamp black. If this seems too greenish, substitute sepia for the lamp black, and add thin washes of the latter, later,

Study of Nasturtiums in Water Colours. By Clara Goodyear.

Study of Nasturtiums in Water Colours. By Clara Goodyear. Floral Decorative Studies.

XII Nasturtiums Their Treatment In Oil And Water C 168No. 4   Nasturtiums: Nature Study. Pen Drawing by Victor Dangon.

No. 4 - Nasturtiums: Nature Study. Pen Drawing by Victor Dangon.

Decoration for a Box. By M. L Macomber.

Decoration for a Box. By M. L Macomber.

Detail for Top of Box.

Detail for Top of Box.

Nasturtium Decoration. By Jean W. Inglis.

Nasturtium Decoration. By Jean W. Inglis.

(For suggestions for treatment, see page 147.) where the soft grey tint is needed. For the red streaks use rose madder, a little cadmium, and sepia. Vermilion may be used in some parts where a brighter effect is desired. In the shadows the same colours may be used, but with less yellow ochre, and for the dark streaks of colour, pure rose madder and sepia (with very little water) may be put on, in crisp touches, with a fine brush.

For the local tone of the leaves, which are delicate blue green, wash with lamp black, with sepia and a little cadmium in the shadows. The white of the paper is saved for the lights at first, and in the finishing are covered with a thin wash of cobalt, yellow ochre, and rose madder. The high lights may now be picked out with a piece of thick blotting paper which has been cut to a point.