Comparison With Isometric Projection

In oblique projection, as in isometric, the end sought for is the same - a more or less complete representation, in one view, of any object. Oblique projection differs from isometric in that one face of the object is represented as if parallel to the vertical plane of projection, the others inclined to it. Another point of difference is that oblique projection cannot be deduced from orthographic projection, as is isometric.

Characteristics Of Method

In oblique projection all lines in the front face are shown in their true lengths and in their true relation to one another, and lines which are perpendicular to this front face are shown in their true lengths at any angle that may be desired for any particular case. Lines not in the plane of the front face nor perpendicular to it must be determined by co-ordinates, as in isometric. It will be seen at once that this system possesses some advantages over the isometric, as, for instance, in the representation of circles, as any circle or curve in the front face is actually drawn as such. Fig. 174, Fig. 175, and Fig. 176 show a cube in oblique projection with the 30-degree, 45-degree, and 60-degree slant, respectively. Fig. 177 shows a hollow cylinder in oblique projection. Figs 178, 179, 180, 182 are other examples of oblique projections. Fig. 180 is a crank arm. The method of using co-ordinates for lines of which the true lengths are not shown, is illustrated by Figs 181 and 182. Fig. 182 represents the oblique projection of the two joists shown in plan and elevation in Fig. 181. The dotted lines in the elevation, Fig. 181, show the heights of the corners above the horizontal stick. The feet of these perpendiculars give the horizontal distances of the top corners from the end of the horizontal piece.

Oblique View of Cube at 30 Degrees.

Fig. 174. Oblique View of Cube at 30 Degrees.

In Fig. 182 lay off from the upper right-hand corner of the front end a distance equal to the distance between the front edge of the inclined piece and the front edge of the bottom piece, Fig. 181. From this point draw a dotted line parallel to the length. The horizontal distances from the upper left corner to the dotted perpendicular are then marked off on this line. From these points verticals are drawn, and made equal in length to the dotted perpendiculars of Fig. 181, thus locating two corners of the end.

Oblique View of Cube at 45 Degrees.

Fig. 175. Oblique View of Cube at 45 Degrees.

Oblique View of Cube at 60 Degrees.

Fig. 176. Oblique View of Cube at 60 Degrees.

Oblique View of Hollow Cylinder.

Fig. 177. Oblique View of Hollow Cylinder.

Oblique View of a Miter Joint.

Fig. 178. Oblique View of a Miter Joint.

Oblique View of Cylinder.

Fig. 179. Oblique View of Cylinder.

Oblique View of Crank Shaft.

Fig. 180. Oblique View of Crank Shaft.

Plan and Elevation of Wooden Brace.

Fig. 181. Plan and Elevation of Wooden Brace.

Oblique view of Wooden Brace.

Fig. 182. Oblique view of Wooden Brace.