Fig. 50 shows a sample sheet of plain letters, such as are particularly applicable to working drawings. They are especially devised for easy, quick, and uniform strokes. Each draftsman has a character of his own in lettering and figuring, and the form of lettering which is most natural for him to use is the one he will use to best advantage. It is necessary, however, to confine draftsmen to a general type in order to make their work reasonably uniform; and the sample sheet (Fig. 50) represents not only the most common type in use, but a type to which almost any draftsman can readily train his eye and hand. Whether the slopes are forward or backward, or straight up and down, is of little importance, as long as the general style is maintained.

Small Letters. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz.

Small Letters. abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz.

Capital Letters. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ&.

Capital Letters. ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ&.

ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ &.

ABCDFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ &.

Fig. 50. Sample Sheet of Plain Letters Used in Working Drawings.

Drawing Room Practice

Every drafting room has certain methods and rules peculiar to its own organization and that of the shop to which it supplies drawings. While it is impossible to formulate any set of instructions which will cover all situations, the accompanying sheet, "Drawing Room Practice," is consistent with general practice in modern drawing offices and the fundamental principles discussed elsewhere in this book. It is a condensed code of procedure which the student will do well to hang in some convenient location near his table, and to consult freely as he works. It should not take the place of the explicit discussions of the text, but should be used as an index to it and as a reminder.

Drawing Room Practice 60058