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Elementary Metal Work | by Charles Godfrey Leland



A Practical Manual For Amateurs And For Use In Schools

TitleElementary Metal Work
AuthorCharles Godfrey Leland
PublisherWhittaker And Co.
Year1894
Copyright1894, Whittaker And Co.
AmazonElementary Metal Work

By Charles Godfrey Leland

Late Director of Industrial Art Work in the Public Schools of Philadelphia. Author of'" Practical Education," "The Minor Arts," "A Manual of Design," "Wood Carving," "Leather Work," &c., &c., &c.

-Preface
This work contains an explanation of the processes of cold metal work, chiefly as applied to decorative or industrial art, and especially with a view to their being taught to children in elementary an...
-Bent Iron Or Strip Work. Introduction - Tools - Materials - Curves
If the pupil or reader would get an idea of the first principles of strip or bent metal-work, let him or her take a strip of cardboard six or eight inches in length, and one third of an inch in breadt...
-Tools
The Tools Required For Rudimentary Bent Metal-Work Are Very Few And Inexpensive, But For The More Advanced Pupil Others Will Be Required. Where There Is A Class The Following Should Be Provided, One l...
-Anvils
For small work, an iron weight of from one to three pounds, with one side smoothed by any smith, and set in a wooden block, makes a very good anvil. When an anvil cannot be obtained a flat-iron rev...
-Lesson I
The principle of design in bent iron-work, - as in most curved decorative work, is that of the growth of plants; or organic development; that is, of a trunk or stem from which grow branches and leaves...
-Curves
When the pupil can make a ring, he can proceed to form semicircles or C's. As these C's run into spirals at one or both ends, and are modified into more than one form, Fig. 11, b-f, they require more ...
-Lesson II. Making Rings And Curves Into Objects
If we make three C's of strip-iron and rivet them at equal distances round on a circle, as shown in Fig.18, we have something on which a cup, or small bowl may be placed, or into which a cylindrical g...
-Hanging Hooks
The simplest useful object which can be made is a hanging hook. This must be made of rather thick sheet iron. Curve one end and drill a large hole in the other, to receive the nail in which it is to h...
-Crossed Strips
A very pretty and curious effect, not much used in strip or ribbon-work, and not even mentioned 1 In Figs. 24, 26, and some others the plan is supposed to be triangular or three-footed; but two han...
-Lesson III. Bent Iron-Work
The second stage of bent iron-work is to apply or fasten the strips in ornamental form to frames. These are iron rods of different thickness, varying it may be from the tenth or eighth of an inch in d...
-Borders
Borders generally consist of ornaments regularly repeated on one, or between two frame rods, Fig. 35. Wherever a rectangular space is to be filled, a border adds greatly to the appearance, and for thi...
-Figure Work In Strip Or Ribbon
Fig. 36. Simple Plant Forms for Figure Work. Italian bent iron-work is limited as regards ornament chiefly to circles, S curves, and spirals, nor does it often go beyond a repetition of the si...
-Of Setting Glass, Mother-Of-Pearl, Etc
The ordinary Venetian work seldom goes beyond setting disks or circles of coloured glass or square panes in lanterns, but as soft strips can be easily bent to any common curve or geometrical form, suc...
-Soldering
In the ordinary strip-work nothing is used to connect the bands except riveting and clamps. But to unite portions of frames there must often be if not positive welding at least an union of metal to me...
-Flat Sheet Metal Work. Shearing, Chiselling, Fret-Sawing, And Pressing
Istinct from, but closely allied with strip metal work, is sheet metal work. This is very beautiful and also easy work when soft and thin sheet metal is used. It entered largely into old German d...
-Moulded Sheet Metal Work
Heet brass and copper, especially red metal, and also thin malleable iron when it can be obtained, can all be shaped as easily as damp leather, in fact, more easily, because they retain any form or in...
-Moulded Sheet Metal Work. Continued
Brass or copper may be easily hammered into a cup like half an egg-shell. Two of these fitted one into the other, and riveted or soldered, make oranges or apples. The riveting is effected by first put...
-Repousse Or Embossed Sheet-Metal Work
He art of embossing sheet metal, or making raised designs on it, by beating it with certain tools and a hammer, is called Repousse. Exact imitations of such work can also be made by pressing the ...
-Repousse On Wood
O begin, let the pupil obtain a good panel of soft pine wood, let us say of six inches by six, or any other suitable size. It must be free from knots or defects, and about three-quarters of an inch in...
-Repousse On Wood. Continued
Fig. 84. Study of Weeds, entirely in Outline, with Tracers. Let it be impressed on the mind that the pupil, before going further, must learn to run the lines and execute the matting or groundi...
-Repousse On Pitch
o get the highest relief in sheet-metal work we must of course push the pattern out from the back, and not drive the back in from the face. To do this the sheet must be laid on some substance whi...
-Venetian Work
To work repousse on a jar, pot, or vase, etc., fill the vessel with pitch or cement, and then let it cool and harden. To remove it, heat it again. If the pupil will be contented to begin by simp...
-Patterns For Repousse Work
Fig. 97. Pattern either for a Panel or for a Cylindrical Vase. It may be enlarged, if necessary, by repeating one or more of the divisions. Fig. 98. Paper Knives: a, Sawed Brass; b, c, Re...
-Ornamental Silver Work
There are many very pretty silver ornaments which any lady might wear, and yet are extremely easy for any girl or boy to make, and require very few implements. I have seen in Nubia very neat objects o...
-Roughly Engraved
Fig. 108. Old Scotch Brooches The easiest way to make these is to draw the figure on ordinary paper, paste it on the sheet metal, and then cut it out with fret-saw or scissors. If there be in...
-Nails And Nailed Strips
T was extensively recognized in ancient metal work that shining points of light were of themselves very attractive, and therefore bosses were so freely used in armour, and even imitated in round colou...
-Nail-Head Ornaments
A Nail driven in a wall is an ugly object; but the worst and roughest may easily be converted into an ornament. For this there are two ways. Cut out a leaf or sprig with a narrow tapering stem, and wr...
-Scale Work
Omewhat like this is a very easy and effective style of ornamentation, which has also never been described in any book. This is Scale Work, which can be made from any waste metal. Cut the iron or bras...
-Stencil Cutting
Tencilling is painting patterns or pictures over open spaces cut in thin sheet metal, cardboard, or wood. The latter are seldom used; but fret-sawed boards, when the patterns have been sawed out, can,...
-Works On Practical Education
By Charles G. Leland, M.A. Drawing And Designing. In a Series of 29 Lessons. With 42 Illustrations. Second Edition. Fcap. 4to, sewed, 1s.; cloth, 1s. 6d. It has a good equipment of plates, and...









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next page: Practical Sheet And Plate Metal Work | by Evan A. Atkins