Great decorative use may be made, and is made, in white work of dots or spots, "seeding" as they call it, which may be executed in French knots, but is more often stitched with a double thread

93. White Work With Seeding And Matting

93. White Work With Seeding And Matting

from the back, the worker holding the cloth upside down in her hoop while she does it. It is probably only by the association of ideas that the dots of thread thus left exposed suggest something like seed pearls ; they are not really round, as may be seen in the dotted leaves in Illustration 93 (White Work With Seeding And Matting). The filling in of the leaves outlined in satin stitch in Illustration 92 (Details Designed To Be Worked Chiefly In Short Satin Stitches) shows a very minute variety of seeding technically known as " matting." The value of this kind of stitching in white work is apparent in most of the illustrations to this chapter, where it is used to give texture varying from just a tint, as in Illustration 92 (Details Designed To Be Worked Chiefly In Short Satin Stitches), to a more or less conspicuously dotted surface as in the butterfly in Illustration 96 (White Work With Seeding And Sparring).

Applique

By means of applique the worker on fine cambric has an opportunity of getting the effect of solid white upon a relatively greyish tint. It is a simple and quite a common device to plant little squares of cambric upon cambric in the way shown in Illustration 94 (White Work On Cambric With Applique). They are very often sewn down with a sort of herring-bone stitch; but that is for the worker to decide, according as she may wish to emphasise the outline or not. It will be seen that the stitching down in Illustration 94 (White Work On Cambric With Applique) draws the threads of the cambric ground apart, and gives the sort of open outline so familiar in hemstitch.

94. White Work On Cambric With Applique

94. White Work On Cambric With Applique