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Art In Needlework: A Book About Embroidery | by Lewis F. Day



The joint authorship of the work needs, perhaps, a word of explanation. This is not just a man's book on a woman's subject. The scheme of it is mine, and I have written it, but with the co-operation throughout of Miss Mary Buckle. Our classification of the stitches is the result of many a conference between us. The description of the way the stitches are worked, and so forth, is my rendering of her description, supplemented by practical demonstration with the needle. She has primed me with technical information, and been always at hand to keep me from technical error. With reference to design and art I speak for myself.

TitleA Book About Embroidery
AuthorLewis F. Day
PublisherB. T. Batsford
Year1907
Copyright1907, B. T. Batsford
AmazonArt In Needlework: A Book About Embroidery.

Art In Needlework

A Book About Embroidery

By

Lewis F. Day

Author Of 'windows,' 'alphabets, 'lettering In Ornament,' & Other Text-Books Of Ornamental Design

& Mary Buckle

Third Edition Revised And Enlarged

London B. T. Batsford, 94 High Holborn

1907

Printed At The Darien Press, Edinburgh.

By The Same Author

Enamelling.

Pattern Design.

Ornament And Its Application.

Nature In Ornament.

Third Edition.

Windows: A Book About Stained And Painted Glass.

Second Edition.

Alphabets Old And New.

Second Edition.

Lettering In Ornament.

Moot Points: Friendly Disputes Upon Art And Industry. In Conjunction With Walter Crane.

-Preface
Embroidery may be looked at from more points of view than it would be possible in a book like this to take up seriously. Merely to hover round the subject and glance casually at it would serve no usef...
-Descriptive List Of Illustrations
1. tapestry - to illustrate work on a warp, not on a web. From Akhmin in Upper Egypt. Ancient Coptic. (In the Victoria and Albert Museum.) 2. drawn-work on fine linen, embroidered with gold and col...
-Descriptive List Of Illustrations. Part 2
41 & 42. sampler - Showing offshoots from satin and crewel stitches, and incidentally illustrating various ways of shading. A, crewel-stitch ; B, plumage-stitch, worked in the hand ; C, split-stitc...
-Descriptive List Of Illustrations. Part 3
67. raised work, showing underlay of linen, and the way it is sewn down - The work is in flax thread, red, yellow, and white, upon a blue linen ground. The stem is dotted with white beads, the ground ...
-Embroidery And Stitching
Embroidery begins with the needle, and the needle (thorn, fish-bone, or whatever it may have been) came into use so soon as ever savages had the wit to sew skins and things together to keep themselves...
-Canvas Stitches
The simplest, as it is most likely the earliest used, stitch-group is what might best be called CANVAS stitch - of which cross-stitch is perhaps the most familiar type, the class of stitches which com...
-Cushion Stitch
Cushion - stitch consists of diagonal series of upright stitches, measuring in the sampler (C) six threads of the canvas, so that after each stitch the needle may be brought out just three threads low...
-Crewel-Stitch
For work in the hand, Crewel-Stitch is perhaps, on the whole, the easiest and most useful of stitches ; whence it comes that people sometimes vaguely call all embroidery crewel work ; though, as a mat...
-Chain-Stitch
16. Chain-Stitch And Knots Chain and Tambour Stitch are in effect practically the same, and present the same rather granular surface. The difference between them is that chain - stitch is done ...
-Herring-Bone-Stitch
Herring-bone is the name by which it is customary to distinguish a variety of stitches somewhat resembling the spine of a fish such as the herring. It would be simpler to describe them as fish-bone...
-Buttonhole-Stitch
Buttonhole is more useful in ornament than one might expect a stitch with such a very utilitarian name to be. It is, as its common use would lead one to suppose, pre-eminently a one-edged stitch, a st...
-Feather And Oriental Stitches
Feather-stitch is simply buttonholing in a slanting direction, first to the right side and then to the left, keeping the needle strokes in the centre closer together or farther apart according to the ...
-Rope And Knot Stitches
A single sampler is devoted to Rope and Knotted Stitches. They are more nearly akin than they look, for rope-stitch is all but knotted as it is worked. ROPE-STITCH is so called because of its appea...
-Interfacings, Surface Stitches, And Diapers
The samplers so far discussed bring us, with the exception of Darning, Satin-stitch, and some stitches presently to be mentioned, practically to the end of the stitches, deserving to be so called, gen...
-Satin-Stitch And Its Offshoots
Satin-stitch is par excellence the stitch for fine silk work. I do not know if the name of satin-stitch comes from its being so largely employed upon satin, or from the effect of the work itself, wh...
-To Work Surface Satin-Stitch
SURFACE SATIN - STITCH (not the same on both sides), though it looks very much like ordinary satin-stitch, is worked in another way. The needle, that is to say, after each stitch is brought immediatel...
-Darning
It is the peculiarity of DARNING and RUNNING that you make several stitches at one passing of the needle. Darning and running amount practically to the same thing. Darning might be described as con...
-Laid-Work
The necessity for something like what is called LAID-WORK is best shown by reference to satin-stitch. It was said in reference to it that satin-stitches should not be too long. There is a great deal...
-Couching
COUCHING is the sewing down of one thread by another - as in the outline of the flower on the laid sampler, Illustration 46 (Laid-Work Sampler). The stitches with which it is sewn down, thread by thre...
-Couched Gold
Silk does not appear to have been couched in the East in early days ; and, as it was the custom to couch gold thread in Europe at least as early as the twelfth century, it is to be presumed that the m...
-Applique
Embroidery, it has been shown, is much of it on the surface of the stuff, not just needle stitches, but the stitching-on of something - cord, gold thread, or whatever it may be. And instances have bee...
-Inlay, Mosaic, Cut-Work
A step beyond the process of onlaying is INLAY, where a material is laid not on to the other but into it, both being perhaps backed by a common material. The process is, in fact, precisely analogous t...
-To Work Inlay
Inlay lends itself most invitingly to COUNTER-CHANGE in design. In the stole (A) on page 149 the light and dark portions of the pattern are identical. You cannot say that either is the ground; each fo...
-Embroidery In Relief
Embroidery being work upon a stuff, it is inevitably raised, however imperceptibly, above the surface of it. But there is a charm in the unevenness of surface and texture thus produced ; and the aim h...
-Raised Gold
Our sampler of raised work is done in silk. Underlaying is more often used to raise work in gold, to which in most respects it is best suited. The methods shown in the sampler would answer almost equa...
-Quilting
A most legitimate use of padding is in the form of QUILTING, where it serves a useful as well as an ornamental purpose. To quilt is to stitch one cloth upon another with something soft between (or wit...
-Stitch Groups
There are all sorts of ways in which stitches might be grouped : - according to the order of time in which historically they came into use ; according as they are worked through and through the stuff ...
-One Stitch, Or Many?
The first thing to be settled with regard to the choice of stitch is whether to employ one stitch throughout, or a variety of stitches. Much will depend upon the effect desired. Good work has been don...
-Outline
The use of outline in embroidery hardly needs pointing out. It is often the obvious way of defining a pattern, as, for example, where there is only a faint difference in depth of tint between the patt...
-Voiding
An outline affords a ready means of clearing up edges; but it should not be looked upon merely as a device for the disguise of slovenliness. Unless the colour scheme should necessitate an outline, an ...
-Shading
One arrives inevitably at gradation of colour in embroidery: the question is how best to get it. But, before mentioning the ways in which it may be got, it seems necessary to protest that shading is n...
-Figure Embroidery
To an accomplished needlewoman embroidery offers every scope for art, short of the pictorial; and the artist is not only justified in lavishing work upon it, but at times bound to do so, more especial...
-The Direction Of The Stitch
The effect of any stitch is vastly varied, according to the use made of it. Satin-stitch, it was shown (38), worked in twisted silk, ceases to have any appearance of satin; and it makes all the differ...
-Church Work
It is customary to draw a distinction between church or ecclesiastical, as it is called, and other embroidery; but it is a distinction without much difference. Certain kinds of work are doubtless best...
-White Work
Reference has already been made in passing to the texture given by stitching, and to the variation in colour produced by it according to the direction of the stitch. In white embroidery upon white the...
-Satin Stitch
Of the stitches commonly employed the most serviceable is Satin Stitch Satin stitch, always more or less raised by an under-padding of stitches in the cross direction - tracing is the trade nam...
-Seeding. Matting
Great decorative use may be made, and is made, in white work of dots or spots, seeding as they call it, which may be executed in French knots, but is more often stitched with a double thread ...
-Eyelets
Eyelets such as those forming the berries in Illustration 92 (Details Designed To Be Worked Chiefly In Short Satin Stitches), are worked by first piercing little holes in the cloth and then stitchi...
-Drawn Work
By piercing a number of holes very close one to sparring another, and binding them together at the edges, a OR SPOKE kind of open-work is produced which, as may be seen in the vase shape in Illustrati...
-A Plea For Simplicity
The simplest patterns are by no means the least beautiful. It is too much the fashion to underrate the artistic value of the less pretentious forms of needlework, and especially of flat ornament, whic...
-Embroidery Design
Perfect art results only when designer and worker are entirely in sympathy, when the designer knows quite what the worker can do with her materials, and when the worker not only understands what the d...
-Embroidery Materials
Embroidery is not among the things which have to be done, and must be done, therefore, as best one can do them. It is in the nature of a superfluity: the excuse for it is that it is beautiful. It is n...
-Stuffs
Linen is a worthy ground-stuff, which may be worked on with flax thread, crewel, or silk, but they should not be mixed. Cotton is hardly worth embroidering. Of woollen stuffs, good plain cloth is an e...
-Thread
With regard to the thread to work with : The coarser kinds of flax are best waxed before using. The crewel to be preferred is that not too tightly twisted. Filoselle is well adapted to couching, and m...
-Gold
For couching gold, a very fine twisted silk does well. Purse silk, thick and twisted, lends itself perfectly to basket work. Working in coloured silks, one should take advantage of the quality of pure...
-Chenille
A not very promising substance to embroider with is chenille. It came into use in the latter half of the seventeenth century, and was still in fashion in the time of Marie Antoinette. The use of it is...
-Ribbon. Shaded Silk
There is less objection to embroidery in ribbon, which also had its day in the eighteenth century. It was very much the fashion for court dresses under Louis Seize. Broderie de faveur it was called...
-A Word To The Worker
A good workwoman will not encumber herself with too many tools; but she will not shirk the expense of necessary implements, the simplest by preference, and the best that are made. Embroidery needle...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design
Published And Sold By B.T. Batsford 94, High Holborn, London A List Of Standard Books On Ornament & Decoration, Including Furniture, Wood-Carving, Metal Work, Design, Etc, Publish...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 2
A HANDBOOK OF PLANT FORM FOR STUDENTS OF DESIGN. By Ernest E. Clark, Art Master, Derby Technical College. Containing 100 Plates (size 10 1/2 x 7 1/2 in.), illustrating 61 varieties of Plants with nume...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 3
MR. LEWIS F. DAY'S WORKS - continued. NATURE AND ORNAMENT. Being a new treatise founded on the author's Nature in Ornament, which is now incorporated in it. By Lewis F. Day. Two vols., medium 8vo (9...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 4
PROFESSOR MEYER'S TEXTBOOKS. A HANDBOOK OF ORNAMENT. With 300 Plates, containing about 3,000 Illustrations of the Elements and Application of Decoration to Objects. By F. S. Meyer. Third Edition, r...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 5
THE PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN. A Textbook for Students and others, especially designed to meet the requirements of the Board of Education Examination Syllabus on Principles of Ornament. By G. Woolliscro...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 6
WOOD-CARVING DESIGNS. A Series for Students, Teachers, Designers and Amateurs. By Muriel Moller. With a Foreword by Walter Crane. Six Imperial Sheets comprising 31 Working Drawings of Panels, Frames, ...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 7
HINTS ON WOOD CARVING FOR BEGINNERS. By Eleanor Rowe. Fourth Edition, revised and enlarged. With 23 full-page Illustrations. 8vo, paper cover, price is. The most useful and practical small book on...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 8
OLD OAK ENGLISH FURNITURE. A Series of Measured Drawings, with some examples of Architectural Woodwork, Plasterwork, Metalwork, Glazing, etc. By J. W. Hurrell, Architect. Containing no full-page photo...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 9
OLD SILVERWORK, CHIEFLY ENGLISH, FROM THE XVth TO THE XVIIIth CENTURIES. A series of choice examples selected from the unique loan collection exhibited at St. James's Court, London. Edited, with Histo...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 10
A BOOK OF CHRYSANTHEMUMS. Containing 50 exquisite studies of this extremely decorative flower, printed in the beautiful variety of colours for which it is famous: ranging from snowy white, delicate pi...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 11
HOW TO JUDGE ARCHITECTURE. A Popular Guide to the Appreciation of Buildings. By Russell Sturgis, M.A. With 84 full-page Illustrations, reproduced in half-tone, from photographs of some of the chief bu...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 12
BUNGALOWS AND COUNTRY RESIDENCES. A Series of Designs and Examples of executed Works. By R. A. Briggs, F.R.I.B.A. 5th and enlarged Edition, containing 47 Photo-lithographic Plates, many of which are n...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 13
THE PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURAL PERSPECTIVE. Prepared for the use of Students, etc, with chapters on Isometric Drawing and the Preparation of Finished Perspectives. By G. A. T. Middleton, A.R.I.B.A. W...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 14
A HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE. Having Special Regard to the Natural Artistic Results of Construction and those Methods of Design which are the Result of Abstract Thinking and of the Pure Sense of Form. By...
-Books On Decorative Art Ornament And Design. Part 15
EARLY RENAISSANCE ARCHITECTURE IN ENGLAND. An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Tudor, Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods, 1500-1625. By J. Alfred Gotch, F.S.A. With 88 Collotype and other Plate...









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previous page: The Ladies' Work-Table Book: Domestic Needlework in Nineteenth-Century America | by Margaret Vincent
  
page up: Needlework Books
  
next page: Educational Needlecraft | by Margaret Swanson and Ann MacBeth