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A Sewing Course For Teachers | by Mary Schenck Woolman



Comprising Directions For Making The Various Stitches And Instruction In Methods Of Teaching

TitleA Sewing Course For Teachers
AuthorMary Schenck Woolman
PublisherFrederik A. Fernald
Year1913
Copyright1893 and 1908, Mary Schenck Woolman
AmazonA sewing course for teachers

By Mary Schenck Woolman, B. S.

President Of The Women's Educational And Industrial Union And Professor Of Household Economics In Simmons College

Fifth Edition, Revised

Washington, D. C.

Frederik A. Fernald 1913

Copyright 1893 And 1908 By Mary Schenck Woolman

An Interleaved Edition of this book is published, in which are inserted 31 leaves of bristol-board for mounting the practice pieces made by the student. Price, $3.50 net.

Interleaved copies with sets of models mounted on the bristol-board leaves can be supplied by the Domestic Art Department of Teachers College. Price, $19.25 net.

-Preface
The introduction of manual training as a necessary part of education has raised sewing to an art of great importance. Outside of the practical advantage of being able to use the needle, the mental tra...
-Preface To The Second Edition
The careful student of the trend of educational thought in the present day is impressed with the idea that it is as necessary to provide in the schools for some form of hand work as it is for academic...
-Preface To The Third Edition
In sending forth the third edition of the Sewing Course the author would urge anew upon all sewing teachers their need of knowing the general work of the grades or high schools in which they are tea...
-Preface To The Fourth Edition
The fourth edition of the Sewing Course has been entirely rewritten and contains almost a new volume on teaching. This educational section has been prepared in response to the frequently expressed wis...
-Notes For Teachers
Purpose of the Sewing Course. This book is written for the purpose of giving to teachers the most important principles of plain sewing. Since there is not time in the courses in normal schools for ...
-Mounting Finished Work
Object teaching is an important factor in the schools, and the teacher of sewing will find samples of her own hand work will greatly assist her in giving correct ideas of construction to her pupils. ...
-The Teacher
Many qualities unite in the making of a good teacher. Her personality is most important, for her physical, mental and moral influence is ever moulding her pupils, even without her conscious effort. He...
-Sewing in the Public Schools
Sewing was introduced into the curriculum of public schools many years ago for utilitarian purposes, i. e., it was felt that girls needed to know how to sew, and as they failed to learn at home, the p...
-Self-activity and Social Service
Frobel's heartfelt cry of the need of training every child's natural activity if he would be harmoniously developed gave a new meaning to manual work. Psychologists studying the development of the bra...
-The Need of Child Study
If sewing is to add to the mental and moral strength of the children, if a love of the true and beautiful is to come through it, the work must take them into account. The child must not be sacrificed ...
-Children's Work
In early years the child should not be allowed to do fine sewing. Primitive nations used the needle in many ways adapted to the use of children, in coarse weaving; in basketry, in which more or less r...
-Finished Articles and Connected Thought
A course of sewing gives innumerable opportunities for the construction of serviceable and interesting things. Teachers need never be at a loss for application of any stitch in a useful article which ...
-Correlation
There is continual opportunity for connecting a course of sewing with the every-day life of the children at home, at school, or in society, and gradually interesting them in the bettering of industria...
-Textile Study in the Schools
The Study of Textiles has been accorded a place in the curriculum of many schools on account of its educational, as well as its practical, value. Woven materials play an important part in the every-da...
-Drawing and Design
Lessons in drawing or color should accompany the entire course in sewing. The simple plans of the first grade for ornamenting a little burlap mat, needle-case or cover, as well as the high school desi...
-Trade School Teaching
If a school is seriously preparing its pupils for trade life, the following points need special thought: (i) The teacher cannot give her best service unless she knows the class of work and the require...
-Sewing in Foreign Lands
Sewing is a usual form of handwork throughout the civilized and uncivilized world. The form of the stitches varies little, but the principles of construction and the application in articles and garmen...
-Drafting and Cutting
In the elementary school it is not wise, nor indeed is it usually possible, to teach elaborate dressmaking. It is, however, advisable that girls from the sixth or seventh grade up should have some exp...
-Grade Work Based on the Industries
The present interest in the study of anthropology has had its effect on the course of study in the schools and has given an impetus to the revival of many primitive arts as a part of the curriculum. T...
-Grade Work Based on the Home and its Industrial Life
The aim in the best schools is clearly a social one. Much is accomplished toward this end when the child works with love and interest on something dear to his own life; greater good, however, will be ...
-Handwork for the First Four Years
In the first four school years the handwork should be selected from many fields. It should never be confined to one branch of industry. The following occupations all offer excellent opportunities for ...
-Suggestive Sewing For The Elementary School
First Grade. Coarse canvas mat. Needlebook of card-board. Fringed towel. Napkin-ring of canvas. Book-marker of canvas. Iron-holder. Pan-lifter. Broom-cover. Scrub-cloth. ...
-No. 1. Cardboard Sewing
Materials For Practice Cards. Coarse Wool Cotton or Linen. Tapestry Needle. Application-Needlecase or blotter. Designs pricked on cards and followed by the needle are often used for the...
-No. 2. Canvas Work
Materials For Practice Burlap, Java, or some similar canvas. Colored Zephyr, or Wool. Tapestry Needle. Application Mats, rugs, bookcovers, bags or needle-books. Soft, coarse canvas i...
-No. 3. Weaving
Materials For Practice Cards (two), 4x2 3/4 Inches Double Zephyr, or Wool. Flat Bodkin, or coarse Tapestry Needle. Application (1) Cards ready for weaving can be purchased or the classe...
-No. 4. Folding A Hem
Materials For Practice Crinoline or Paper, 5x5 Inches (2 pieces). Application Duster or Washcloth. Rule A hem is made by folding a piece of material twice over. The depth of the first t...
-No. 5. Mitering
Materials For Practice See Nos. 4 and 6. Application Dust-cloth, doiley or holder. To miter is to change a fold from having a square end at the corner to an abrupt angle in whieh one fold ...
-Nos. 6, 7 And 8. Running
Materials For Practice Unbleached Muslin 6x3 1/2 Inches. White Muslin 5x2 1/2 Inches. White or Colored Cotton No. 60 or 70. White Cotton, No. 80. Needle No. 8. Needle No. 10. Applica...
-Nos. 9 And 10. Stitching And Backstitching
Materials For Practice Bleached or Unbleached Muslin, 4x2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces) Colored Cotton, No. 60. Needle, No. .9. Application Beanbag or pan lifter. See also Nos. 21, 22, 23. Use.-Wh...
-No. 11. Overcasting.
Materials For Practice Raw Edges of the Practice Pieces. Cotton No. 60. Needle No. 9. Application On the seams of articles or garments. See No. 23. Use. - To keep the raw edges of materials f...
-Nos. 12 And 13. Running And Backstitching
Materials For Practice Bleached or Unbleached Muslin, 4x2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces). Colored Cotton, No 66. Needle, No. 9. Application See Nos. 9, 10, 13, 20, 21 and 22. Use For se...
-No. 14. Hemming
Materials For Practice Unbleached Muslin, 6x2 1/2 Inches. White Victoria Lawn, 4 1/2 x l Inches. Colored Cotton, No. 60. White Cotton, No. 100-150. Needle, No. 9. Needle, No. 1...
-Nos. 15, 16 And 17. Overhanding
Materials For Practice No. 1. Narrow Striped Gingham, 4x4 Inches. No. 2. Damask, 4x4 Inches. No. 3. White Muslin, Two selvage strips, 4x2 in. Torchon Lace, 1/2 in. wide, 9 1/2 Inches. White Cott...
-Nos. 18 And 19. Garment Bias And True Bias
A bias cut in cloth is a slanting or diagonal severing of the material. Both warp and woof threads will be cut. (See Fig. 15.) It may vary with the requirements of the garment. A true or perfect bias,...
-Garment Bias
Materials For Practice Kindergarten Paper (Colored), 4x3 Inches. Brown Manila Paper, 13 1/2x4 1/2 Inches. Striped Paper for Bias Facing. Application Petticoat or small dress skirt. Use And...
-True Bias
Materials For Practice Kindergarten or Manila Paper, 5x2 1/2 Inches. Application Bias ruffle on skirt, bias facing on petticoat, a gusset, and folds for trimming. Use For folds, facings...
-Bias Ruffle
Materials For Practice Triangle of Fine Checked Gingham, 6 Inches on Straight Sides. Cord 6 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, 10-11. Application Trimming for underclothing or dolls' c...
-Nos. 20, 21 And 22. Seams
Use A means of fastening together two or more pieces of material. Varieties Single and double seams. For the former the following stitches are used, the running; stitching; backstitching and ...
-Felling
Materials For Practice White Muslin, 4x3 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 10-11. Application Pillowcases and underclothing. Use To join two straight or two bias pieces of m...
-French Seam
Materials For Practice White Muslin, 4x3 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 10-11. Use For seams in lace, embroidery, wash goods that are not lined and for underclothing. It is use...
-Overhand And Fell And Other Seams
Materials For Practice White Muslin, 4x3 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 10-11. Application Undergarments, ball covers and sails. Use In seams where great strength and nea...
-No. 23. Application Of Stitches
The following suggestions for applying the stitches are given to help teachers to plan courses of work. Real articles and garments are mentioned in the hope that these will be used in place of models ...
-Button Bag
Materials For Practice Gingham or other Cotton Material. 12x4 Inches. Cotton, No. 60-80. Needle, 9-10. Take a piece of material 12x4 inches. Fold it together with the wrong side out so tha...
-Aprons (Small Size)
No. 1. With Casing. No. 2. With Band. Materials For Practice Gingham or Muslin (1) 7x8 In. Cotton, No. 60-100. Needle, No. 9-11. 16x1 In. Gingham or Muslin Gingham or...
-Nos. 24, 25, 26, 27 And 28. Buttonholes, Eyelets, Loops, Sewing On Buttons, And Blanket Stitch
Blanket Stitch Materials For Practice White Muslin, 4x4 Inches (two pieces) Small pearl button. White Cotton, No. 60. Needle, No. 9. Application On aprons, bags, cases, doll's ...
-Eyelets
Application A bag with eyelets to pass tape through and draw the opening together. Use A hole pierced in material and made strong by stitches around the edge of it, through which a tape or la...
-Loops
Application On a doll's dress or garment in place of a buttonhole or as a hanger for a bag the stitch being made over a brass ring. Use Where a metal eye would not be attractive in certain ga...
-Sewing On Buttons
Application On aprons, garments and travelling cases. Rule Buttons with four holes may have the stitches form a cross on the face and two diagonals at the back, or may have two parallel stitc...
-Blanket Stitch Or Flat Buttonhole Stitch
Application Canvas napkin rings, mats and cases, the bottom of flannel skirts and jackets and in embroidery on linen. Use For finishing raw edges in place of overcasting. It is also used orna...
-Nos. 29, 30, 31. Plackets
Use The opening made in certain parts of garments which gives greater freedom in slipping them on. Skirts and petticoats, shirt sleeves, drawers and chemises, have these openings. Fitness The...
-Placket No. 1
Materials For Practice Gingham or White Muslin, 4x4 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 9-11. Application On a petticoat either lull or small size. Use For finishing the vent ...
-Placket No. 2
Materials For Practice Gingham or White Muslin, 4x4 Inches. 5 1/4 X l 1/4 Inches (lower facing). 3 1/4 x l 1/4 Inches (upper facing) Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 9-11. Application ...
-Placket No. 3
Materials For Practice White Muslin, 4x4 Inches. Finish, No. 1. 5x1 inch on a strip of muslin with one side selvage, Finish, No. . 2. 5x2 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 9-11...
-No. 32. Gusset
Materials For Practice Muslin, 4x4 Inches. Diagonal of a 21/2 Inch Square. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 10-11. Application In place of the placket in a skirt, at the end of sea...
-No. 33. Sewing On Tape
Materials For Practice Muslin, 3x2 1/2 Inches. Tape (1/2 Inch wide,) 5 Inches. 3 Inches. Cotton, No. 70. Needle, No. 9, Application Un towels, dusters and skirts. Use To fas...
-No. 34. Tucking
Materials For Practice Muslin, 6x5 Inches. Cotton, No. 80-100. Needle, No. 9-11. Application On aprons, dolls' clothing or underclothing. Use Folds taken on the right side of material f...
-No. 35. Putting On A Band
Materials For Practice Muslin, 2 1/2 x 1 Inch. (Utilize practice piece No. 34.) Application On aprons, skirts and other clothing. Use A narrow strip of cloth, folded over to cover the p...
-Nos. 36 And 37. Darning
Materials For Practice Stockinet, 4x4 Inches. Colored Cashmere. 4x4 Inches. Fine Darning Cotton. Warp Threads of Muslin. Warp Raveling of Cashmere. Silk of the Same Color. Needle, No. 7...
-Stockinet Darning
Rule (Catching ascending and descending loops. Fig. 32.) Carefully investigate the material to find the character of the threads, as the new threads must resemble those of the stockinet. Fine darni...
-Darning Woven Material
Rule Woven material which has been torn may be repaired by weaving back the broken threads. In fine damask where a small hole has been torn the entire pattern may be woven back, but in most instanc...
-Outline Of Weaving And Darning
I. Weaving. Illustrations Woven materials of various kinds such as canvas, plain weaving in muslin and wool, diagonal and pattern material; a loom; pictures of looms, illustrations on the board....
-Nos. 38, 39, 40, 41 And 42. Patching
Use A piece set in a garment to take the place of a worn or torn part. A patch is used when the hole is too large to be darned. There are many ways of patching. Different kinds and values of mat...
-Hemmed Patch
Materials For Practice Striped Gingham or Plain Muslin. 4x4 Inches or any size desired. Cotton, No. 80 or 100. Needle, No. 10 or 11. 2 1/2 x 21/2 Inches. (This is a little large but it ...
-Overhand Patch
Materials For Practice Striped or Figured Cloth (cotton or wool). 4x4 Inches or any desired size. Cotton, No. 80-100. Silk No. A (shade darker than cloth.) Needle, No. 9-11. 21/2 x 2...
-Flannel Patch
Use As flannel is not liable to fray, the raw edges of the garment and the patch may be held down with herring-bone stitches and still be sufficiently strong. Rule The hole should be cut clea...
-Damask Patch
Materials For Practice Damask, 4x4 Inches or Any Desired Size. l x l Inch or depending on the size of the hole. Flourishing Thread, No. 1000. Ravelings of Damask (warp.) Needle, No. 10. Fi...
-Cloth Patch
Materials For Practice Wool or Worsted Suiting, 4x4 Inches. Ravelings of Cloth or Silk, No. A. Needle, No. 7-11. Size of patch depends on the kind of patching selected. Application G...
-Nos. 43 And 44. Feather Or Coral And Chain Stitching
Materials For Practice Striped French Flannel. (1/2 inch stripe) 4x4 Inches. Silk (color of the stripe). No. A - B. Needle, No. 8-9. Application On underclothing, baby clothes and small...
-Small Traveling Case
Take a piece of linen or soft colored cotton material such as chambray 9x6 inches. At one end of it cut from each corner a triangle which will be 1 1/2 inches on its straight sides. Make a crease acro...
-Feather Or Coral And Chain Stitching
Sew a tape or ribbon to the hem at the center of the lap and tie it around the ease (Fig. 40), or sew flat linen or lace buttons to the pocket below the lap on either side of the middle of the front a...
-Cover For Trunk Tray
Measure the length and width of a trunk tray or of the bottom of a bureau drawer. Add 2 1/2 inches to the dimensions in each direction to allow for the hems and cut from soft finished cotton material ...
-Chain Stitching
Use As an ornamental finish on material and for marking linen. Rule. - The stitch is made vertically and should be very regular. It is in the form of the links of a chain. (Fig. 41.) The needle is ...
-No. 45. Herring-Bone
Materials For Practice Flannel, 5 1/2 x 21/4 Inches (two pieces). Silk A. Cotton, No. 60. Needle, No. 9. Application On flannel skirts, a flannel patch or as decoration. Use. - (1) To h...
-Nos. 46 And 47. Hemstitching. Drawn Work
Materials For Practice Linen (very fine and sheer), 4x4 Inches. Linen (moderately fine for drawing threads), 5x4 Inches. Cotton, No. 100-150. Needle, No. 10-12. Application On handke...
-No. 48. Whipped Hem
Materials For Practice It is well for children to hemstitch the center of a handkerchief before the corners, as the latter are more difficult. Careful basting makes the work easier. Nainsook, 1x...
-Small Apron Of Fine Muslin
Materials For Practice Dimity, Nainsook or Barred Muslin. 5x6 1/2 Inches. 6x1 Inch (band). 6x1 1/4 Inch (2 pieces for strings). Cotton, No. 100. Needle, No. 11. Put 1/8 men hems along t...
-No. 49. Cross Stitch
Materials For Practice Penelope Canvas or Scrim, 5x5 Inches Colored Wool (Crewel or Saxony.) Colored Silk EE. Tapestry Needle. Application On towels, sheets, washcloths and household ar...
-Nos. 50 And 51. Satin Stitch. Tying Fringe
Materials For Practice Linen. 6x6 or 10x10 Inches Cotton, No. 100. D. M. G. No. 25-60 for Embroidery. No. 16 for the Filling. Needle, No. 8-10. (Two letters stamped in the center or at the...
-No. 52. Embroidery On Flannel. Blanket Stitch, Outline Stitch, Satin Stitch And French Knot
Materials For Practice Flannel, 5x5 Inches. (A scalloped edge stamped on two sides and some simple designs in the center.) Silk, No. B-E. Wool or D. M. C. No. 16. Needle, No. 6-8. Tapestry...
-Nos. 53 And 54. Couching And Applique
Materials For Practice Linen or Unbleached Sheeting, 6x3 Inches. Material in Contrasting Color, 2x2 Inches. Mercerized Yarn, Scotch Floss, or Jute Threads, several strands. Silk, B or C. Need...
-Dressmaking. Sewing On Braid, Binding Seams And Finishing Waists
Application Of The Principles Of Dress Construction Dressmaking is a subject for the high school rather than for elementary education. Some experience of it, though, is well in the seventh and eigh...
-Nos. 55 And 56. Sewing On Braid And Velveteen
Materials For Practice Cashmere or Cloth, 4x4 Inches. Cotton Skirt Lining When Desired, 4x4 Inches. Mohair Skirt Braid, 4 1/2 Inches. Bias Velveteen, 4 1/2 Inches. (The color of the bra...
-Nos. 57 And 58. Placket And Pocket For Wool Dress Skirt
Materials For Practice Heavy Cloth, 4 x 2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces), 5x1 1/2 Inches (2 pieces, selvage). Lining if Desired, 4x2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces). Binding, 6 Inches, or Cashmere, 4x2...
-No. 59. Front Of Waist. Hooks And Eyes
Materials For Practice Dress Material, 4x3 Inches (2 pieces). Waist Lining (Percaline or French Cambric). 4x2 3/4 Inches (2 pieces). Bone, 4 Inches (2 pieces). Hooks and Eyes (small ...
-Nos. 60 And 61. Bone Casing. Seam Binding
Materials For Practice Dress Material, 4x2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces). Waist Lining (Percaline or French Cambric) 4x2 1/2 Inches (2 pieces). Whalebone, 3 1/8 Inches. Silk Binding, 10 Inches Galoon or...
-No. 62. Slip Stitching
Materials For Practice Cashmere, 5x3 Inches. Silk A. (To match cashmere.) Needle, No. 10 Application In neckwear, trimming for hats, or folds on dresses. Use. - In dressmaking and milli...
-Prices Of Materials
Width or Size. Price. BEESWAX $0.50 lb. Binding- Seam .10 piece Velveteen .25 ...
-Suggestive List Of Domestic Art Books. I. Educational
SCHOOL AND SOCIETY. Dewey, Chicago Univeristy Press, 1899. PLACE OP INDUSTRIES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. K. E. Dopp. Chicago University Press. THE AIM OF EDUCATION. C. H. Hen-derson. Popular Scie...
-Domestic Art Books. II. Child Study
A STUDY OF CHILD NATURE. Elizabeth Harrison. Chicago Kindergarten College, 1891. CHILDREN'S RIGHTS. K. D. Wiggin. Houghton, 1892. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE CHILD. Oppenheim. Macmillan. NOTES OF ...
-Domestic Art Books. III. Study Of Textiles
HOME LIFE IN COLONIAL DAYS. A. M. Earle. Macmillan, 1899. COTTON SPINNING. E. Marsden. Macmillan, 1895. WOOLEN SPINNING. Chas. Vickerman. Macmillan, 1894. HOW WE ARE CLOTHED. Chamberlain. Mac...
-Domestic Art Books. IV. Sewing And Dressmaking
SCHOOL NEEDLEWORK. O. C. Hap-good. Ginn, 1893. ELEMENTARY NEEDLEWORK. K. McFoster. Prang, Boston. SCIENTIFIC SEWING AND GARMENT CUTTING. Wakeman. Silver, Boston. SCHOOL AND HOME SEWING. Frances ...
-Domestic Art Books. V. Miscellaneous Handwork
CANE BASKET WORK. Annie Firth. Scribner, 1899. HOW TO MAKE BASKETS. Mary White. Doubleday. VARIED OCCUPATIONS IN WEAVING. VARIED OCCUPATIONS IN STRING WORK. Louise Walker. Macmillan, 1895. AR...
-Domestic Art Books. VI. Household Art
ART IN NEEDLEWORK. L. F. Day. Scribner, 1900. HOUSEHOLD ART. Mrs. Candace Wheeler. Harper, 1893. SOME PRINCIPLES OF EVERYDAY ART. L. F. Day. Scribner, 1900. COLOR, DRESS AND NEEDLEWORK. Lucy ...
-Domestic Art Books. VII. Ornament And Design
LESSON ON DECORATIVE DESIGN. Jackson. Chapman, London, 1894. GRAMMAR OF ORNAMENT. Owen Jones. Bernard Quaritch, London, 1868. EGYPTIAN DECORATIVE ART. F. Petrie. Putnam, 1895. DESIGN FOR WOVE...
-Domestic Art Books. VIII. Dress
GLOVES - Their Annals and Associations. Beck. Hamilton, London, 1883. A BOOK ABOUT FANS. Flory. Macmillan, 1885. LACE. Goldenberg. Brentano, 1904. LA DEN TELLE ET LA BRODERIE SUR TULLE, Vols. I ...
-Domestic Art Books. IX. Architecture And Furnishing
DECORATION OF HOUSES. Wharton. Scribner, 1897. OLD FURNITURE BOOK. Moore. OLD CHINA BOOK. Moore. Stokes, 1903. COLONIAL FURNITURE IN AMERICA. Lockwood. Scribner, 1901. JAPANESE HOMES AND T...
-Domestic Art Books. X. Industrial And Technical Education
EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. Fabian Ware. Appleton, 1901. MANUAL TRADE AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION: Proceedings of the National Educational Alliance. Thos. M. Balliet, 1903. MAKING...
-Domestic Art Books. XI Social And Industrial Life
INDUSTRIAL EVOLUTION OF THE UNITED STATES. Wright. Chautauqua Press, 1895. INDUSTRIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. Coman. Macmillan, 1905. GENERAL HISTORY OF COMMERCE. Webster. Ginn, 1902 SO...
-Domestic Art Books. XII. Color
PHILOSOPHY OF COLOR. Clifford. The Author, 1904. EDUCATION OF THE NORMAL COLOR SENSE. Jeffries. U. S. Bureau of Education, Circular of Information, 1994. AN ELEMENTARY MANUEL OF COLOR FOR STUDEN...
-Domestic Art Books. XIII. Equipment And Administration
ECONOMICS OF MANUAL TRAINING. Rouillion. 1905. BULLETIN, STOUT MANUAL TRAINING SCHOOL, Menominee, Wis. SCHOOL SANITATION AND DECORATION. Burrage & Bailey. Heath, 1899. Circulars Of Equipment,...
-Domestic Art Books. XIV. Economics
ECONOMIC FUNCTION OF WOMEN. Edward Devine. Pub. of American Academy of Political and Social Science, No. 133, Philadelphia. THE WOMAN WHO SPENDS. Richards. Whitcomb, 1904. OUTLINES OF ECONOMICS....
-Domestic Art Books. XV. Hygiene
Manual Of Personal Hygiene Pyle. Sanders, 1900. FOOD AND DIETETICS. Hutchinson. Wood, 1900. HYGIENE OF SCHOOL ROOM. Berry. Snow and Farnham, 1903. HUMAN BODY. Martin. Holt, 1900. FIRST AID TO...
-Appendix A. Domestic Art Course
Handwork and Connected Thought as given in a City Elementary School KIND OF SCHOOL: - City school in crowded section. ENVIRONMENT: - Poor working class, living in small, often dark apartments, w...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade First
Boys and girls work together. Play spirit emphasized. VARIOUS ACTIVITIES USED: - Play, - dolls, games and toys; Art work; paper work; Clay modelling; Primitive cookery; Simple basket forms; Cord wo...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Second
Boys and girls work together. Aim and various activities as in first grade. I. As related to home. The play spirit of childhood utilized. Bedroom: the bed, made of wood and cord; mattress; co...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Third
Boys and girls work together. AIM: - Usefulness and interdependence on each other. Boys and girls work together, but often at different points of the industry, as in real life. General handwork ...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Fourth
Boys and girls together in some occupations. AIM: - To make the home comfortable and attractive. Girls take some of the clay and wood-work with the boys. I. As related to home. Living room...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Fifth
The girls continue their domestic art work, the boys their woodwork. AIM. How to help in the home, to keep things in order and supply needs. I. As related to home. Activities: emergency box and ...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Sixth Grade
The girls often leave the school after this grade to become wage earners. The sewing machine work is given to aid them in the home or in business. A light-running machine should be provided. AIM. T...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Seventh
This grade gives its handwork time principally to cookery, consequently the domestic art hours are shorter. AIM. The trustworthy housekeeper. Handwork and the sewing machine. I. As related to ho...
-Domestic Art Occupations. Grade Eighth
Cooking is emphasized in this grade, so sewing has only the minimum of time. AIM. The useful, trustworthy, thinking girl. Cooking: tray cover; napkin; hemstitched towel, and table linen. Home:...
-Appendix B. High School Domestic Art Course For Girls
Suggestions for one year of general work for all students. Handwork and connected thought. I. SEWING. If the elementary school has not given sufficient experience in the stitches required for garme...
-Educational Pamphlets By Mary Schenck Woolman, B. S.
President Of The Women's Educational And Industrial Union And Professor Of Household Economics In Simmons College Trade Schools and Culture, 7 pages, ........ .. .05 Trade Schools, 10 page...









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