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Decorative Needlework | by May Morris



These pages are written for and dedicated to those who, without much previous knowledge of the art of embroidery, have a love for it and a wish to devote a little time and patience to its practice. The booklet does not profess in any way to be exhaustive, but should be useful as a keynote to further study, having been written from practical knowledge of the subject.

TitleDecorative Needlework
AuthorMay Morris
PublisherJoseph Hughes & Co.
Year1893
Copyright1893, Joseph Hughes & Co.
AmazonDecorative Needlework

Decorative Needlework

By May Morris.

London:

Joseph Hughes & Co.,

Pilgrim Street, Ludgate Hill, London, E.C.

1893. [All Rights Reserved.]

Printed By W. P. Griffith & Sons, Limited,

Prujean Square, Old Bailey,, London, E.C.

Edition de Luxe, consisting of 125 copies only, of which this copy is No 57

English Embroidery (about 1340)

English Embroidery (about 1340) Portion of a Cope, "Free of Jesse." South Kensington Museum.

-Dedicatory Note
These pages are written for and dedicated to those who, without much previous knowledge of the art of embroidery, have a love for it and a wish to devote a little time and patience to its practice. Th...
-Chapter I. Historical Glance
IT is only of recent years that the art of needlework has come to be divided by a hard and fast line into plain sewing and embroidery. The two branches of the art are to my mind, and indeed used to be...
-Chapter II. Embroidery Stitches. Chain-Stitch, &c
THE foregoing slight sketch of the history of embroidery will give some idea of what can be done and what has been done with the needle alone, or with the needle and a few tools of the simplest descri...
-Embroidery Stitches. Chain-Stitch, &c. Continued
Knotting or French Knot consists of several loops taken round the needle and secured by a stitch. This is effective for thick raised work, for the filling of flower Fig. 5. - Knotting. centr...
-Chapter III. Tapestry, Long-and-Short and Feather Stitches
THESE names are somewhat vague, the stitches being merely varieties of the same, but I quote them as the student will constantly hear them spoken of, or come across them in descriptions of old work. T...
-Chapter IV. Couching and Applique
THE basis of the many elaborate stitches which would be included under the head of couching is, as the name denotes, a laying down of the threads covering the surface to be filled in. Some writers on ...
-Chapter V. Patchwork and Quilting
THE laying down of one stuff on another for decorative purposes brings me to the mention of patchwork, a time-honoured kind of stitchery, familiar by name at least to all of us. More time-honoured, in...
-Chapter VI. Setting to Work
MOST people are familiar with the aspect of an embroidery-frame, or have some idea of what it is like. It consists of two 'beams' or rollers (A) on which the textile is wound, or to which it is merely...
-Chapter VII. Design, Convention and Realism
THE most important element in successful work is the choice of design, and I shall therefore be obliged to linger a little over this subject, as it is impossible to make a clear explanation to those o...
-Chapter VIII. Contrast and Repetition
TO get a harmonious design we must study and consider well of what qualities such a design should be built up. The subordination of one form to another in some way is essential ; there must be some le...
-Chapter IX. Lines and Curves
IN considering the different elements of Design, a little talk about the value and qualities of lines will clear up a good many difficulties for the beginner. Remember well this : a beautiful curve ha...
-Chapter X. Colours and Colouring
CLEAR and beautiful colouring, sometimes complex, sometimes simple, is one of the principal features of fine embroidery. Some people are by nature more of colourists than others, and often hit upon th...
-Colours and Colouring. Continued
For elaborate and costly work, it is obvious that gold and silver will form an important factor in the scheme of colour but here again it must be noted thatmetals, if employed in great mass...









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