Age : 14-18 Years ; 18-24 Years

Here the scope of the designer is again widened by the introduction of leaf forms - simple in outline at first, and later, if the type of leaf chosen be much complicated by serrations, it is well to design it to fit a given space of simple outlines, so that whilst keeping the individual characteristics of the leaf, it may at the same time be controlled into convenient dimensions. Diag. 186 gives some leaves of the simplest shapes, and Diag. i86a gives elaborations showing arrangements of one or more leaves to simple masses. Always draw in the main vein or " backbone " of a leaf first when designing it, thus to gain a sure way of seeing that such leaves take the right direction and grow beautifully out of their stem lines if they have any.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 189Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 190

After experimenting with the leaf combined with the simple circle and the straight lines, the student can give to the circles definite floral appearance, and may now use her knowledge of botany, giving correct construction to the plants used as motives in so far as is convenient and suitable for the pattern. It is difficult to put any limit to the liberty we may take with botanical correctness. One may make use of a four-petalled flower where there ought to be five petals, but it is not desirable that roses should grow on ivy stems. One may turn and twist a plant which generally grows perpendicularly, but it is not good to make a cluster of such pendant flowers as laburnum to take an erect position. Such liberties must, however, be left to the choice and good taste of the designer.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 191Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 192

Diags. 187 and 188 illustrate a child's bodice and tippet embroidered in wool with leaves and a square panel device combined with spots.

Diags. 189 and 190 illustrate the end of a sideboard or toilet cloth and a square table mat, with a design of clover.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 193Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 194

Diags. 191, 192, a collar, belt, and cuff with a simple pattern of leaves and apples, suited for working in silk or flax on firm linen.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 195

Diag. 193, a blouse bodice with design of square flowers, leaves and dots, suited for working in silk or cotton on woollen or linen material.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 196

Diag. 194, a coverlet of linen with square roses and leaves contained in oblong panels.

Diag. 195, is an excellent example of a simple leaf motive combined with straight lines of darning and chain stitch. More developed floral forms are in Diags. 196, 197, and 1.98. The first of these has the circle divided up into the more or less symmetrical petals of a rose, surrounded by a circle of spots. A border of heart-shaped leaves is a simple framework. The whole to be worked in satin stitch with silk on linen or spotted damask. Diag. 197 is a cushion with a centre panel and flowers of applied linen on linen. The circles here take another rose form more conventionalized than Diag. 196. Diag. 198 is a combined yoke and front panel for a blouse, and here the rose is again used, but in a much conventionalized square form.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 197Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 198

197. Cushion in Linen Applique.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 199

198. Yoke and Front of Blouse Sewn with Silk.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 200

Diag. 199.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 201

Diag. 200.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 202Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 203Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 204

Diag. 202.

Diags. 199 and 200 represent a bag and sachet on linen with a simple blossom evolved from the circle.

Diag. 201 is a portiere on coarse grey linen with applied borders and leaves of green linen and simple flowers and berries sewed in wools. The long lines of stem may be couched in coarse rug wool, one or more strands according to its thickness.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 205

Diag. 202 illustrates nightdress, brush, and handkerchief bags of linen or silk. The floral form here is taken in profile, roughly filling a semicircle, lines of couching connect the square-corner devices, and the whole is finished with a neat piping.

Diag. 203 gives a design of roses and leaves for a cushion, to be worked in coarse silks or wool.

Lesson VIII Introduction Of The Leaf Form 206

201. Curtain for a Door, Sewn with Wools.