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Embroidery Or The Craft Of The Needle | W. G. Paulson Townsend



In that remarkable revival of the arts and handicrafts of design, which has, curiously enough, characterised the close of a century of extraordinary mechanical invention and commercial development, that most domestic, delicate, and charming of them all, perhaps, the craft of the needle, holds a very distinct position.

Embroidery Or The Craft Of The Needle

By W. G. Paulson Townsend

Design Master at the Royal School of Art Needlework

Author of "Measured Drawings of French Furniture " " Plant and Floral Studies," etc.

Assisted by Louisa F. Pesel With Preface By Walter Crane

Containing 86 Illustrations

London, Truslove & Hanson, LTD.

Quilted Linen Coverlet. Embroidered in Coloured Silks. English late 17th Century.

Quilted Linen Coverlet. Embroidered in Coloured Silks. English late 17th Century.

Printed And Bound By Hazell, Watson' And V1ney, Ld., London And Aylesbury

-Preface
In that remarkable revival of the arts and handicrafts of design, which has, curiously enough, characterised the close of a century of extraordinary mechanical invention and commercial development, th...
-Extracts From Author's Preface To The First Edition
In response to the inquiries repeatedly received from students for a handbook on embroidery, I have endeavoured to place before them the following hints and suggestions ; to supply a want, and fill a ...
-Author's Preface To The Second Edition
The first edition of this handbook was published at a time when no text-book of recent production on the subject of embroidery was to be had. Since then, several excellent books on needlework have app...
-List Of Illustrations
Frontispiece. Quilted Linen Coverlet, embroidered with Coloured Silks. English, late seventeenth century [532 - 1S97, V. & A. M.*]. Reproduced from a water-colour drawing prepared by Dorothy Lane. ...
-Introduction
We may say the art of embroidery still lives, though its position is that of an art which has beaten a retreat. Its sphere of employment is now a cramped one, and there is little likelihood of its eve...
-Chapter I. Design As Applied To Embroidery
All branches of artistic handicrafts are closely linked together in the arts of design. Material and method of production only separate them, and then the division is, in some instances, very subtle i...
-Chapter I. Design As Applied To Embroidery. Continued
There is a natural convention which appears to be part of the process of adapting flower forms to embroidery. The worker should aim at simplicity in representing plant form. There is no necessity to s...
-Chapter II. Utility - Method And Material
Early decoration in many cases was actually adopted to increase the usefulness of the object ; the savage, by the notching of his paddle, not only ornamented it but ensured a firmer grip as well ; als...
-Applique
Counterchange ornament is often used in applique work. For this purpose the design must be so constructed that both the device and the ground are identical in shape and area (see figs. 44 and 46, Plat...
-Inlaid Work
The Persians use inlay more often than actual applique. Sir R. Murdock Smith, in his South Kensington Handbook on Persian Art, says, A peculiar kind of embroidery and patch-work combined is largely m...
-White Work
For articles appertaining to dress, white embroidery is especially suitable. Most beautiful pieces of dress decoration in white work are to be seen in the Victoria and Albert Museum. The detail from a...
-Laid Work
Laid work is a much more economical method of producing an effect than by working the design in satin stitch. In laid work all the silk is on the surface of the material, as the term implies, while ...
-Gold Embroidery
The material on which gold embroidery is to be worked should be herring-boned very evenly and firmly on to a backing of linen (never cotton), and stretched in an embroidery frame. Sometimes the gold e...
-Raised Work
The highly padded work, and particularly the raised figures, are very unsatisfactory, but for ecclesiastical work, hangings, heraldry, etc., in bullion and silk, the padding of severely drawn flowers ...
-Chapter III. Adaptation - Symbolism
The actual systems of building pattern, of pattern forms, methods of drawing and modelling figures, and various handicrafts have been discovered long ago, but it is in their re-combination and adapta...
-Symbolism
Almost all art in the early days expressed religious thoughts by means of symbols. To communicate ideas by emblematical signs in this way has been the desire of man from the earliest times. It is a...
-Symbolism. Continued
The cross is the acknowledged mark or sign of the Christian faith throughout the world. In Christian art the image of the lamb, the symbol of our Saviour, the Good Shepherd, is frequently represent...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated
The coloured frontispiece represents the centre portion of a quilted linen coverlet, embroidered with coloured silks. English, late 17th century [532 - 1897]. During the latter part of the seventeenth...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 2
No. I. Orphrey, or border to an orphrey altar-frontal. Spanish, about 1550 [248 - 1880]. Ground of crimson velvet, with repeating conventional ornaments, alternated with roundels respectively containi...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 3
Plate No. 14. Plate No. 14. Part of a hanging of linen, embroidered with coloured silks. Spanish, seventeenth century [342 - 1885]. The design consists of conventionally knotted scrolls, fro...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 4
Plate No. 20. Portion of a carpet. Persian, early eighteenth century [859 - 1876]. Velvet, embroidered in gold and silver. Kakvin is noted by the Persians for this kind of embroidery, which is now ...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 5
Plate No. 27. Linen pillow-case. English, sixteenth century. The property of the Right Hon. the Viscount Falkland. The design, consisting of vine-leaves and fruit, is well balanced. Each leaf is fi...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 6
Border of a petticoat. Acquired in Crete (Turco-Greek ?), peasant's work. Eighteenth century [2048 - 1876]. Of coarse linen, embroidered with red silk in satin, twisted-chain, and Oriental stitches; a...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 7
Plate No. 40. Back of a Chasuble. Italian, 17th Century [58 - 1891.] Plate No. 41. Embroidered Panel, Pomona. Designed by the late Sir E. Burne-Jones and William Morris. Worked at ...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 8
Plate No. 46. Enlarged Detail of Lacis Work, on a Netted Foundation. Example of Lacis Work on a Mesh of Linen. Plate No. 47. Child's linen cap, with bands of cut and drawn work, an...
-Chapter IV. Description Of Designs Illustrated. Part 9
Plate No. 53. Example of Bargello work in cushion and satin stitches. Italian, seventeenth century. In this pattern the powdering of flowers is in cushion stitch, and the background consists of a d...
-Chapter V. Implements, Appliances, And Materials Used In Embroidery
In all artistic handicrafts good workman-ship is obviously an essential quality, and, in ordinary circumstances, to obtain technical excellence, good tools are necessary. The embroideress requires but...
-Materials
Crewels. - Never take more than about half the length of a skein in your needle. If a long needleful is used, it is not only wasteful, but liable to pull the work, and become frayed or knotted before ...
-Transferring Designs
The transferring of designs on to the material is at no time a very easy occupation, and is certainly one which most people prefer to have done for them. However, it is necessary; and it should be don...
-Drawn Thread Work
Stitches. - The withdrawing of either the warp or woof threads of a linen or cotton material within certain narrow bands or squares, and gathering together in groups the remaining threads by darning o...
-Chapter VI. Ecclesiastical And Heraldic Needlework
The noblest and most perfect examples of ecclesiastical needlework produced in olden times reveal the decorative value of gold and silver threads. In some instances the work is executed entirely in th...
-Chapter VII. Stitches
A good design may lose much of its beauty and character, in embroidery, by an injudicious selection of stitches. It is difficult to say just where the charm and interest produced by the texture in sti...
-Chapter VII. Stitches. Part 2
Buttonhole Stitch (fig. 5) is familiar to every one. The working can be clearly seen by the diagram. In the drawing it is represented rather open; both open and closed it can be used effectively. The ...
-Chapter VII. Stitches. Part 3
Herring-bone (fig. 15). - A stitch well known to the seamstress, and very easy to work. Imagine two parallel lines marking the width of the space to be filled with the stitch, bring the needle through...
-Chapter VII. Stitches. Part 4
Embroidery Stitch (fig. 24A), Long-and-short Stitch, or Feather Stitch (Opus Plumarturn). - So called from its supposed resemblance to the plumage of a bird. Long-and-short stitch and embroidery stitc...
-Chapter VII. Stitches. Part 5
Plate No. 66 Fig. 43. - Taken from a piece of Indian work in beetle's wings and silver thread. The jewelled effect of beetle-wings in this border suggests possibilities with the use of blues, p...
-Chapter VII. Stitches. Part 6
Plate No. 70 Figs. 61 and 6ia explain how tambour gold is used over cardboard. The design should be first drawn on the material, then it is cut out in cardboard. Each petal or shape must be rather ...









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