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Garments For Girls | by Celestine Leontine Schmit



Until recent years the art of cutting women's and children's garments without the aid of commercial patterns has, in this country, been known only to dressmakers and tailors. It is possible, however, for any one to master the definite yet simple underlying principles which the system of drafting here presents and thus be able to make in a very short time a perfect fitting skirt and waist pattern. These patterns may be readily used as a base upon which all the patterns needed for other garments can be developed. This method originated with Mme. A. Guerre and is extensively used in the public schools of France. Through its use, the expense and wastefulness of commercial patterns may be eliminated.

TitleGarments For Girls
AuthorCelestine Leontine Schmit
PublisherNew York The Century Co.
Year1919
Copyright1919, By The Century Co.
AmazonGarments For Girls
Book Cover

Garments For Girls

By Celestine Leontine Schmit

Associate Professor Of Home Economics, University Of Wisconsin

Illustrated With Photographs And Diagrams

New York The Century Co.

1919

Copyright, 1919, By The Century Co.

To Madame A. Guerre and to her daughter, Madame Le Comte, Professors in the "Ecoles Professionelles" and the University Des Annales of Paris, my former teachers, from whom i drew much inspiration and enthusiasm for this work.

-Preface
So far sewing has not received the attention which it should in the school curriculum, and yet no other subject helps more to cultivate thrift, order, and economy. With the introduction of the straigh...
-Foreword
Until recent years the art of cutting women's and children's garments without the aid of commercial patterns has, in this country, been known only to dressmakers and tailors. It is possible, however, ...
-Chapter I. Application Of Hand And Machine Sewing
In the sewing outfit illustrated here, all the stitches and many of the seams with which pupils are already familiar are reviewed. A place for everything and everything in its place is demonstrated...
-Sewing Bag
Fig. 2. - Sewing Outfit I, Sewing bag; II, bottom of sewing bag, with divisions marked; III, needle book: IV, spool holder; V, top part of spool holder; VI, pin cushion. A, Turned hem; B, casing; ...
-Needle Book
Required Material 2 pieces of cardboard 3 by 5, 2 pieces of cloth 5 by 7, 1 piece of cloth 3 by 7, 2 pieces of white cotton flannel 3 by 5, thread, needle, and pins as for the sewing bag. Cu...
-Spool Holder
Required Material 6 pieces of cardboard 5 long, 1 wide at the top and 1 3/4 wide at the bottom; 6 pieces of material 7 by 3 1/2, 1 piece of cardboard 3 by l 1/2, 1 piece of cardboard 1 by 2...
-Pin Cushion
Required Material 2 pieces of material 3 1/2 in diameter, bran, sawdust, or vegetable hair for filling, needles and thread as for previous articles. If the material used is not strong, line it with...
-Holder And Cover
Holders are used in every food class. There should be at least two sets for each student: A set consists of two. A holder may be made of three thicknesses of outing flannel or of any remnants which ma...
-Chapter II. Garment Construction
Before beginning to make any kind of garment it is necessary to analyze it and consider: 1. The required measurements. 2. The different parts of which it is composed. 3. Suitable ...
-Chapter III. Sewing Apron
A sewing apron should be worn during the sewing class. It not only protects the dress but the pockets are convenient for holding the necessary tools and materials during the work. One pocket should be...
-Chapter IV. Plain Kimono Nightgown
Unbleached or bleached muslin (fruit of the loom, daisy cloth, longcloth, etc.), outing flannel, or cotton crepe are the materials most commonly used for nightgowns. For fine nightgowns nainsook may b...
-Chapter V. Kimono Apron With Tucks
An apron is worn to protect the dress. The material must be selected to accord with the use of the apron. Tea and afternoon aprons may be made of dainty, soft materials such as dimity, muslin, dot...
-Chapter VI. Kimono Nightgown With Yoke
This garment, with the exception of the yoke, which is made of pink chambray, is made of unbleached muslin. The material is folded and Fig. 20. - Kimono Nightgown with Yoke the pattern drafted a...
-Chapter VII. Kimono Nightgown With Tucks And Handmade Trimming
This nightgown is made according to the same measurements as the pattern just used. Instead of two tucks on each side of the shoulders as in the apron we have five, six or seven Fig. 24. - KImono N...
-Chapter VIII. Work Oh Cooking Apron
This style of apron has been adopted for a cooking apron in several schools because it does not require much material and is easily laundered. The width is such that it can be easily passed flat throu...
-Chapter IX. Gores
1. First Method (See Fig. 30). Ordinarily, material varies in width from 27 to 36, but this is not wide enough for the bottom of some of the garments of adults. To provide the necessary width...
-Chapter X. Cooking Or Serving Apron
This apron, like the kimono apron, may have the skirt closed or open. If the skirt is closed, it often takes the place of a dress skirt, and worn with a white waist it makes a very satis-factory garme...
-Chapter XI. Petticoats
The petticoats shown in Fig. 37 are cut without the assistance of paper patterns. The measurements are marked directly on the cloth. Fig. 37. - Six-gored FlaNNel Petticoat with Scalloped Edge A, D...
-Six-Gored Petticoat With Ruffle
Suitable Material Sateen, silk, chambray, crepe, seersucker or gingham may be used. Required Material For a petticoat with a pleated ruffle as shown in Fig. 41, 2 1/4 or 2 1/2 yards of goods 36 wi...
-Chapter XII. Drawers
Drawers are divided skirts. The materials used in nightgowns, such as muslin, cambric, longcloth, cotton crepe, nainsook, etc., may be used for drawers. Drawers are made in various ways. They may be ...
-Drawers. Continued
Making of the Closed Drawers 1. Join the two front and the two back pieces with either a French seam or a flat fell seam. If a flat fell seam is made, care should be taken Fig. 48 that the fell of...
-Chapter XIII. Skirts
Skirts are made of cotton, linen, woolen, or silk material. These materials vary greatly in weave, finish and width. In selecting the material for any skirt the essential points to be considered are:...
-Skirts. Part 2
Cutting Out The Paper Pattern 1. Cut out along the waistline EGL. 2. Cut along the center back LJ. 3. Cut the bottom line JIOK. 4. Divide the pattern on the line OG. Requi...
-Skirts. Part 3
Preparing the Belt 1. Cut off a belt about 4 to 6 longer than the actual waist measure. 2. Fold it into two parts. Mark the middle with a pencil or a contrasting thread. This will indicate t...
-Chapter XIV. Middy Blouse
It is desirable that each student have her own pattern fitted to her so that she may be certain that the neck, the shoulder seams, and the arm curve do not need any alteration after the blouse is cut....
-Middy Blouse. Part 2
Cutting Out the Pattern Cut out around the neck EN and the shoulder seam NQ, then all around the armseye, QORYW, the front shoulder seam WV, and the front neck VT. Then separate the pattern at RS. D...
-Middy Blouse. Part 3
Folding the Material for Cutting (See Figs. 66A, 66B). 1. Take Indian head (44 wide) and cut off one length of 25 or 26. Fig. 67. - Middy Blouse Partly Finished A, Lower part of collar stitch...
-Middy Blouse. Part 4
Cuff The cuff on this middy will be closed and, therefore, must be large enough to slip over the hand. (See Figs. 67 F, 67 G.) Cut the cuff 10 by 6 and pin it to the sleeve. Do not stitch it un...
-Chapter XV. Shirt Waist
Shirt waists are made of a great many different materials. They may be made of silk, wool, cotton or linen. The material should be chosen with regard to its use and suitability. The main factors to be...
-Shirt Waist. Part 2
Making Shoulder Seam 1. Take the front and the back and lay the right side of the pressed back shoulder seams directly over the right side of the pressed front shoulder seams, letting th...
-Shirt Waist. Part 3
Putting the Buttonholes on the Waist The buttonholes are put in between the front edges of the right side front in groups of three. Leave 1/4 between the buttonholes. The first group should come exa...
-Chapter XVI. Corset Cover
The corset cover is a garment worn by every girl. Sometimes it is used in combination with a petticoat, sometimes in combination with a chemise or drawers. No matter how it is used, Fig. 77. - C...
-Corset Cover. Continued
Preparing the Band for the Corset Cover 1. Cut off a band 4 longer than the waist measure, the 4 to be divided as follows: 1 on each side to be turned under to reinforce the band at the but...
-Chapter XVII. Envelope Chemise
The envelope chemise is a garment which at the present time is well liked and much worn by young girls. It is a combination of corset cover and drawers. Muslin, longcloth, cotton crepe or seersucker i...
-Envelope Chemise. Shoulder Seam
A flat fell is used for the shoulder seam. Selecting the Trimming for Undergarments The neck, the armseye, and the bottom may be finished in many different ways. Tatting, crocheted lace, ready-made l...
-Envelope Chemise. Finishing the Neck, the Armseye, and the Bottom
I. First Method 1. Make an even 1/8 turn from the right to the inside of the garment, all around the neck, the armseye, and the bottom of the garment. Crease this well and press with a hot iro...
-Envelope Chemise. Making the Strap
To allow for more room in the back of the chemise a strap may be added to the point L. This strap is made of two thicknesses of material and is 6 by 2 when finished. 1. Cut a piece of muslin 12 1/2...
-Finishing Envelope Chemise
Sewing the Strap to the Garment 1. Fold the strap through the center lengthwise. Crease this well. On this crease measure 2 from the end and put in a pin. 2. Take the garment and put th...









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previous page: Embroidery Or The Craft Of The Needle | W. G. Paulson Townsend
  
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