The Backstitched Seam.

This stitch probably derives its name from the fact that the needle is taken backward in making each stitch. It is frequently called "a whole-back-stitched seam." "Back" tells us the kind of a stitch and "whole" or all the way, the distance back.

The stitch resembles a machine stitch on the right side.

There is no space between the stitches.

This seam is used for joining seams, for strengthening and ornamenting the various parts of a garment, and for sewing on tapes.

Materials. - These materials will be required: A practice piece cut one and a half inches from the last seam;

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ILL. 18. - Beginning to Backstitch. 37

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ILL. 19. - Backstitching Partly Done.

"ground downs" or "between" needles; red cotton; scissors ; ruler or tape measure.

1.   Prepare and baste as for running seam.

2.   Do not use a knot.

3.   Hold the work around the first finger of the left hand.

4.   Sew from right to left.

5.   Leave a half inch of thread and begin with two backstitches.

6.   Sew by taking a short stitch to the right, and then taking a stitch twice as long to the left on the wrong side of the seam. Make one stitch at a time. Or, bring your thread through at 1 (see Illustration No. 18), take your needle back to 2 and bring it out again at 3; the distance between 1 and 3 being the size of the stitch that is to follow.

7.   All stitches must meet on the right side of the seam. See Illustration No. 19.

8.   Be careful to keep the stitches uniform in size.

9.  In fastening the thread take the needle through to the wrong side and make two stitches through the last ones made.

10. Mend or join the thread the same as in running stitches.

Mistakes Likely to Occur IN a Backstitch Seam.

1.   Spaces left between stitches.

2.   Stitches crooked; a number of stitches made on the top of each other instead of always bringing the needle out beyond the thread.

3.  Want of uniformity in the size of the stitch.

Backstitch and Three Running Stitches.

This seam may be varied by increasing or decreasing the number of running stitches. It is used when a seam somewhat stronger than a running seam is required.

Materials. - The materials required are: A practice piece cut one and a half inches from the last seam; sharp needles; cotton; scissors; ruler or tape measure.

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ILL. 20. - A Seam Made with a Backstitch and Three Running Stitches.

1.   Arrange material and baste as for running seam.

2.  Begin as for the running stitch with two backstitches.

3.   Make three running stitches.

4.   Make one backstitch.

5.   The last stitch will naturally cover the space to the right of it. See Illustration No. 20.

Half Backstitching.

Half backstitching is made in the same manner as backstitching, except that the needle is taken halfway back instead of all the way back to the last stitch.

It is more rapidly done than the backstitch.

Materials. - The materials required are: A practice piece cut one and a half inches from the last seam; "ground downs" or "between" needles; cotton; scissors; ruler or tape measure.

1.   Prepare material and baste as for running seam.

2.   Begin by leaving a half inch of thread and making a backstitch.

3.   Take one stitch at a time.

4.   Make the stitch halfway back to the last one.

5.   Continue the seam, giving close attention to the uniformity of the stitch and space.