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Home And School Sewing | by Frances Patton



Miss Kirby, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, has conducted monthly meetings of the teachers of sewing, in which were freely discussed methods of making and teaching the various seams, and all matters pertaining to the subject. In order that the best method of instructing the children in classes might be secured, experiments were made and reported upon, the teachers being encouraged to express their difficulties and tell their successes; thus placing the experience of the entire force at the disposal of each individual. The lessons in this book are mainly the outgrowth of the practical suggestions mentioned above, tested and worked out many times by the author in the schools under her charge, together with the careful study of books on the subjects treated.

TitleHome And School Sewing
AuthorFrances Patton
PublisherNewson & Company
Year1901
Copyright1901, By Frances Patton
AmazonHome And School Sewing
Book cover: Home and School Sewing

Home and School Sewing

By Frances Patton

Training Teacher, Department of Sewing in The Philadelphia Normal School

Newson & Company

Fifteen East Seventeenth Street, New York

Copyright, 1901, By Frances Patton.

All rights reserved.

-Preface
Seventeen years ago sewing was introduced into the Philadelphia Public Schools. During these years Miss Kirby, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, has conducted monthly meetings of the teachers of se...
-I. Preparation For Sewing
Cutting. Before learning to sew, it is necessary to know how to cut. A garment must be first cut in shape before it can be sewed together. In a sense, the cutting is as important as the sewing; for...
-II. Basting
Basting is a preparation for sewing, and is intended to keep the material in place while the sewing is being done. In even basting, the stitches and spaces are the same length: It is sometimes c...
-III. Hemming
A hem is a fold turned down twice, used to strengthen and finish the material on which it is placed. The two turns of the hem are called the fold of the hem. A notched card may be used as a guid...
-IV. Overseaming
Overseaming is sometimes called overhanding or top sewing, and it gets its name from the manner of making it. In sewing, hold the muslin between the thumb and the first finger of the left hand. ...
-V. Running Seam
A running seam is made by taking the needle in and out of the muslin, keeping the stitches and spaces the same length. It probably is so called because it is a rapidly made seam. It resembles even b...
-VI. Backstitching
The Backstitched Seam. This stitch probably derives its name from the fact that the needle is taken backward in making each stitch. It is frequently called a whole-back-stitched seam. Back tell...
-VII. Overcasting
Overcasting is used to finish the raw edges of a seam and to keep it from raveling. In overcasting a lined dress waist, first press open the seams very carefully, then turn in the raw edges of the mat...
-VIII. Facings
A facing is a fold placed on the edge of a garment to take the place of a hem. Facings are frequently cut on the bias. Garments are usually faced on the wrong side. Materials. - The materials re...
-IX. Slip-Stitching.
Slip or blind stitching is a method of sewing a hem or trimming by invisible stitches. It has probably derived its name from the fact that the needle is slipped between two pieces of material and join...
-X. The Fell
A plain fell is a flat, smooth seam between two pieces of fabric made by putting two pieces of material together with one edge extending beyond the other and hemming the extended edge down. In lowe...
-XI. The Gusset
A gusset is a small piece of material inserted in a garment for the purpose of strengthening or enlarging some opening where there is likely to be more or less strain. On flannel garments where a g...
-XII. The Placket
A placket is an opening or slit made in the upper part of a petticoat or skirt for convenience in putting it on. A placket on a dress is frequently faced on the right-hand side with an extension he...
-XIII. Cording And Piping.
Cording is used to strengthen and finish various parts of a garment, and is made by covering dress cord with a bias piece of material. The width of the bias strips depends on the thickness of the cord...
-XIV. Bindings.
A binding is used to strengthen and protect the raw edges of a garment by covering them with a folded tape, ribbon, braid, etc. Flannel binding is a thin kind of tape with a silky finish. Galloo...
-XV. Mitred Corners
The seam used in mitring corners is formed by joining two pieces of materials together, each cut at an angle of 45 degrees, and sewing them so as to form a right angle. Materials. - These materials...
-XVI. Cutting And Piecing On The Bias.
Materials used as facings or bindings on curved edges are frequently cut on the bias, because when cut in this way they may be stretched to fit the curve. Bias material is often preferred in facing...
-XVII. Gathering
Gathering is a stitch used to compress by the use of plaits or even wrinkles a portion of the material which requires to be drawn into a smaller space; this is necessary to give ease and looseness to ...
-Gathering. Continued
Gathering with a Shell Edge. This sort of gathering is used generally on light-weight silk or woolen materials, and takes the place of a separate trimming at the top of a ruffle. A narrow ribbon...
-XVIII. Bands
Bands Sewed by Backstitching and Hemming. A band is a flat, flexible strip of material on any article of dress, serving to strengthen and confine it. A band should always be cut with the warp of...
-XIX. Darning
Dress Darning - Straight Tear. In darning, the parts of a fabric that are torn or separated should be united by inserting new threads in a manner as nearly like weaving as possible. Quality, textur...
-XX. Patching
Patching is the art of restoring the worn parts of any garment by inserting better material. Good patching depends largely on a thorough understanding of the rules and methods of making the garment...
-XXI. Tucking
A tuck is a plait in a fabric or garment, held in place by stitches; it is frequently one of a series laid parallel. Nothing more completely spoils the appearance of a garment than crooked tucks; t...
-XXII. Fastenings
Buttonholes. A buttonhole is a slit or hole made to receive a button. It is always made on double material, and frequently a third ply is put in to give it additional strength. The size of the b...
-Fastenings. Continued
Common Mistakes in Making Buttonholes. 1. Badly cut hole; out of proportion to size of button Not cut with the thread of the material. 2. Buttonhole commenced at wrong en...
-XXIII. Decorative Stitches
Feather or Brier Stitch. This stitch is used as a pretty finish in all kinds of sewing, and is frequently used to take the place of backstitch-ing, as it is so much less of a strain on the eye. ...
-XXIV. A Lesson In Economy
Shakespeare makes one of his characters say, Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy but much more than mere cost must be considered in order to regulate our expenses wisely in the matter of dress. ...
-XXV. Color In Fabrics
No matter how well garments are cut and sewed, how perfectly they are fitted, or how costly the material from which they are made, the person who does not understand the use of colors in their relatio...
-Silk
Raw silk is the silk as it is reeled from the cocoons. Gloss silk is the loose silk that envelops the cocoons. Two or three threads of raw silk, twisted loosely two or four times to the inch, is...
-Cotton
Among vegetable fibres, the first place must be assigned to cotton, because it supplies by far the largest amount of material for the clothing of mankind, and can be manufactured into an almost unlimi...
-Linen
Linen is a fabric manufactured from the fibres of flax. The flax plant is a slender annual from two to three feet high and has small pointed leaves placed alternately on the stem. It bears a pale b...
-Wool
The term wool is used indefinitely, but is most generally applied to the fine hair of the sheep, and is distinguished from hair solely by being curly and serrated, while the latter is straight and sti...
-The Principal Woolen Cloths
The manufactured woolen materials of most importance are: Armure, a material woven so that it has the appearance of small seeds on the thread. Barre is a name given to a fabric crossed by bars o...
-Other Materials Used in Clothing
While silk, wool, cotton, and linen are the principal textiles used in manufacturing material for clothing, there are a number of other fibres, among which are jute and hemp, which may either be woven...
-Pins
It is most likely that thorns or skewers were originally used as fasteners for garments. Following these, different appliances were used, such as hooks, buckles, and laces, many of which we may suppos...
-Needles
Needles are of various sorts and kinds; namely, the surgeon's needle, the upholsterer's needle, the cook's needle, the glover's needle (three-cornered at the point), the sail-maker's needle (which has...
-Scissors
Scissors are principally made by hand, but the process of making depends somewhat upon the size. Those over six inches in length are called shears. Scissors are first shaped from a bar of flat stee...
-Thimbles
The first thimble seen in England was made in London, about two hundred years ago, by a metal worker named John Lofting. He is said to have acquired a large fortune in the manufacture of this new acce...









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