In the third year the sampler is made of fine white cotton. For this and the work of succeeding years on bleached cotton, the yard wide Fitchville or Masonville cloths have been found most desirable for handsewing, being without dressing. During the first five months of this year, fifteen minutes of the first hour should be devoted to buttonhole making with fine cotton, Nos. 50, 60, and 70, and silk twist. The teacher should have in readiness pieces of canvas and flannel, 3 in. x 8 in. on which to teach cross-stitch, herringbone, and featherstitch, also pieces of linen, to teach hemstitching upon. For several months give class instruction of one-half hour each month in these stitches, as all this kind of work will be used in making the white cloth sampler.

In order to train the eyes and hands of pupils, that they may be prepared for advanced work, let them now practise in cutting exactly along the lines of striped and checked cloths, material for which can be found in pieces left over from dressmaking in the sixth class.

The class drill should be reviewed as often as practicable.

Letters of the alphabet may be made in cross-stitch (see Fig. 49). This practice is to train the eye and hand in spacing distance by threads both across and lengthwise of the cloth, and for marking the initials and age on the sampler. Its practical value otherwise is small, and too much time should not be given to it. Outline-stitch can be used for initials and age, if a pupil's eyesight is too delicate to count threads.

Third Year s Sewing 54

Fig. 49.

Sampler No. 3.

Materials Required

Two strips of bleached cotton (with selvedge on one side) 18 in. x 5 in Two strips of cotton (lengthwise, without selvedge) 9 1/2 in. x 5 in. Three pieces of cotton (for patches) 3 in. square. One piece of cotton (for band) 3 1/2 in. x 2 in.

One piece of cotton (for gusset) 1 1/4 in. square.

One piece of cotton, cut bias, 3/4 in. wide and 10 in. long (for facing the narrow ruffle). One strip of Lonsdale cotton (across the cloth) 8 1/2 in. x 5 in One strip of Lonsdale cotton (across the cloth) 14 in. x 2 1/4 in One strip of flannel (even threads) lengthwise, 18 in. x 6 in. One piece of crash (even threads) for pocket, 6 1/2 in. x 4 1/2 in. White spool cotton Nos. 40, 50, 60, 70, 90, and 100. Needles Nos. 9, 10, 11, 12. Fine crewel needle.

One needleful of white buttonhole twist.

Three spools (three yards each) of embroidery silk in some color. One shirt button. One large pearl button. The estimated cost of white cotton sampler is thirty cents.

Directions For Making Sampler. I

Baste together selvedges of the first two strips of cloth and oversew with No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle, leaving a distance of 4 in. open at one end for a gusset; open the seam and press flat with the thumb-nail.

II

Turn a narrow "handkerchief hem" on the raw edge of the first strip of cloth, as shown in illustration, and hem with No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle.

III

6 1/2 in. from the bottom edge of the strip cut a small hole, as shown in illustration, and mend the hole by making a hemmed-on patch, using a No. 10 needle and No. 70 cotton.

IV

3 1/2 in. above this patch cut another hole, and mend it by inserting a stitched-in patch, using No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle for stitching, and No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for overcasting.

V

Join by a French seam (for direction see second year) the two strips 9 1/2 in. x 5 in.; join on widths, making strip No. 3 18 in. long.

VI

6 in. above the bottom edge of this strip make a cut having two right angles, in this shape, and darn it according to questions and answers 10 to 16.

VII

2 in. above the French seam cut a hole and mend with an oversewed patch, using No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle for the oversewing, and No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for overcasting.

VIII

Join strip No. 3 to the raw edge of strip No. 2, making a fell, as described in sampler No. 2; use No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle for stitching, No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle for hemming. When felling a bias seam, lay the hem with the grain of the cloth. It is much easier to hem with the grain than against it (Fig. 50).

IX

On the lower edge of the sampler turn a hem 2 1/2 in. broad, and hem with No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle.

IX 56

Fig. 50.

X

Make a buttonhole 1 in. long in the broad hem of strip No. 3; use No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for overcasting, and No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle for working the buttonhole. Make a buttonhole 1 in. long in the broad hem of strip No. 1.

XI

Put in a gusset at the opening of the oversewed seam, using No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle for oversewing, and No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for hemming.

XII

Gather strip No. 1, 1/4 in. below the top, stroke, and put into the band, using No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle for gathering and stitching, No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle for oversewing and hemming.

Make a buttonhole 1/2 in. long in the right-hand end of the band.

Sew a shirt button on the left-hand end of the band, using No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle.

XIII

Take the smaller strip of Lonsdale and make a handkerchief hem on each end and across one side, using No. 100 cotton and No. 12 needle. This is for a ruffle.

Gather the ruffle 1/4 in. from the raw edge; stroke and stitch to the top of the sampler with No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle. Still holding the ruffle toward the person, baste to this seam the bias strip of cloth, and make one back-stitch and two running stitches directly over the gathering. Turn all these edges flat to the under edge of the sampler; turn under the top edge and one end of the bias strip; hem the turned edge to the sampler and oversew one end. The other end is held in place by the stitching of the flannel.