To make the opening at the side, from A cut down the fold 8 in. from the top. For binding, take a strip 17 in. long, selvedge way of the cloth, and bind the opening. Baste the binding on both sides of the opening, to the right side of the garment, by 1/4 in. basting stitches.

Back-stitch close below the basting, then turn the strip over and hem to the wrong side directly over the stitching. This makes a very strong finish for the side, which will seldom wear or tear. Back-stitch and fell the seams. For children it is more economical and quite as comfortable to leave the front and the back of the drawers of the same length; then, being worn evenly, the garment lasts longer.

Pattern for a chemise waist, for a child eight to ten years: This pattern consists of four pieces, one-half of the front and back, two pieces for the bias bands.

1 2/3 yds. of yard-wide cloth are needed for two waists. One-half of this will not cut one waist.

Front (Fig. 69).

Fig. 69.   Front of chemise waist.

Fig. 69. - Front of chemise waist.

1. For the front draw an oblong 13 in. x 20 in., with the short sides horizontal, making the left vertical dotted to represent the line at which the cloth or paper is doubled.

2. From the upper left corner measure vertically downward on the dotted line 5 1/4 in. x 11 in. x 13 1/2 in. Mark the points, respectively, A for the lower part of the front neck, K' for the upper, and R' for the lower edge of the bias band.

3. From the upper left corner measure horizontally to the right 3 1/2 in., marking the point B, for the upper part of the neck; 6 1/2 in., marking the point X, for length of shoulder; 9 1/4 in., marking the point Y, for width of arm-size. Connect B-A by a line, curving gradually to the right for the curve of the neck.

4. From the point X draw downward a dotted vertical 6 1/2 in., and mark the lower end E, for length of arm-size. Mark the point C on this line 1 in. below the point X, for slope of shoulder seam. Connect the points B-C by a straight line to give the slope of the shoulder seam.

5. From Y draw downward a dotted vertical 6 in., and mark the point

F, for the top of the under-arm seam.

6. From A draw a horizontal line 6 in. to the right, for width of chest, and mark the point D. Connect C, D, E, and F by a line curving to the left for the curve of the arm-size.

7. From the lower right corner measure vertically upward 1 1/4 in., and mark the point G; 7 3/4 in., and mark the point R; and 10 1/4 in., and mark the point K. Connect the points F and G by a straight line, to give the slope of the side seam. The points R-K are for the upper and lower edges of the bias band.

8. From the lower left corner measure 3 in. horizontally to the right, and mark the point H. Connect the points H and G, to give the slope at the lower end of the side seam.

9. Connect R and R' and K and K' by dotted lines, for the bias band at the waist. 10. Draw the pattern on paper and cut from A to B, C, D, E, F, G, and H.

This garment serves as a chemise and a waist, to which the drawers and skirts can be buttoned. It is a comfortable garment for children.

The band is made bias for elasticity and strength, and hemmed on the under side. It is 2 1/2 in. wide, to give opportunity to lower the buttons as the child grows.

Back (Fig. 70).

Fig. 70.   Back of chemise waist.

Fig. 70. - Back of chemise waist.

1. For the back draw an oblong 11 in. x 19 in., the shorter sides horizontal, making the right vertical dotted, to represent the line at which the cloth or paper is doubled. From the upper left corner measure 1/1/2 in. horizontally to the right, and mark the point S. From this point draw a dotted vertical to the lower edge of the oblong, to mark the width of the hem at the back. On this line mark measurements for the lower part of back of neck and for width of bias band. From the upper end of this line measure vertically downward 3 1/2 in., 9 3/4 in., 12 1/4 in. Mark the points, respectively, A for the lower part of the back neck, K' for the upper, and R' for the lower edge of the bias band.

2. From the upper left corner of the oblong measure horizontally to the right 5 3/4 in., and mark the point B, for the upper part of the back neck; 8 3/4 in., mark X, for length of back shoulder. Connect A and B, to give the curve of the neck, by a line curving gradually to the right.

3. From A on the hem line make a dotted horizontal line 6 in. to the right, and mark the end D, for the width of the back.

4. From the point X draw downward a dotted vertical 5 1/4 in., and mark the lower end F, for the length of the back arm-size. Mark the point C on this line 1 in. below X. Connect B and C by a straight line, to give the slope for the shoulder seam. Connect C, D, and F by a line curving to the left, to give the curve of the back arm-size.

5. From the lower right corner measure up 1 1/2 in., and mark the point

G; 7 1/2 in., mark the point R; and 10 in., and mark the point K. Connect F and G, to give the slope of the side seam. The points R and K are for the upper and lower edges of the bias band.

6. From the lower left corner of the oblong measure 3 in. to the right, mark the point H. Connect G and H by a straight line, to give the slope at the lower end of the side seam.

7. Connect R and R' and K and K' by straight lines for the bias band of the waist.

8. Draw the pattern on paper and fold over the hem at the hem line, then cut from A to B, C, D, E, F, and G. Face the neck, arm-size, and lower edge with a strip of cloth cut on the bias.

The advantage of material cut on the bias is in its power to stretch when used as a facing on curves; and on a straight edge it makes a smoother lining than a straight strip of cloth. When cutting twilled fabric, fold the corner so that the lines of the twill will be perpendicular to the fold, crease firmly, and cut in the crease.

Cutting bias strips: Fold the bias edge the desired width, crease as before, cut in the crease. Use the first strip as a guide, by pinning it to the bias edge of the material and cutting all the strips necessary. If one strip is not of sufficient length, join the two right sides together by a stitched seam. Make the seam flat and the edges even (see Fig. 71, A and B).

Bias strips are much used in dressmaking to cover cord, etc. This covered cord makes a neat finish for a child's dress waist.

As in the preceding years, questions on the work of the year are given out to the pupils from time to time, to which they are required to write full answers; but it is not thought necessary to specify these questions as heretofore.

Fig. 71, A and B.

Fig. 71, A and B.