XIV

Make a handkerchief hem on the ends of the second piece of Lonsdale, then make a 1/4 in. hem on one side of it. Above this hem make three tucks the same width as the hem, using No. 90 cotton and No. 11 needle.

Whip the upper edge of the ruffle, using No. 40 cotton and

No. 9 needle.

Oversew this ruffle to the lower edge of the sampler, holding the sampler toward the person, sewing from left to right, so as to make one stitch come in every little groove made by the whipping. Use No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle.

xv. Turn down one end of the flannel strip 1 1/4 in., baste it, and then make herringbone stitch over the edge with embroidery silk, using the crewel needle (see question and answer 32).

Hold the flannel so that the herringbone stitches just made will be at the right-hand side and on the under side of the flannel; then turn down and baste the upper edge of the flannel 1/8 in., turn again 1 in., and baste for a hem. Then blind-stitch this hem with No. 9 needle and No. 60 cotton, according to question and answer 33.

With embroidery silk, feather-stitch over the edge of this hem, according to question and answer 35.

Measure the strip of flannel with the raw edge of the sampler, and with a pencil draw scallops on the end so as to make it the same length as the sampler when finished (see question and answer 36). Then, with embroidery silk, work as described in question and answer 37.

3 in. above the scalloping make a cut in the flannel 1 1/2 in. long, and darn, using No. 100 cotton and No. 12 needle for overcasting the cut edges together, and No. 8 needle and ravellings of flannel for darning.

Half way between the darn and the top of the flannel strip cut a hole and mend it with a patch, according to question and answer 38.

In the hem of the flannel strip, cut a buttonhole 1 in. long, overcast with No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle, and work with buttonhole twist.

Baste the flannel to the raw edge of the sampler 1/4 in. from the edge, and stitch with No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle, holding the flannel toward the person.

XVI

Prepare and hemstitch the pocket according to questions and answers 40 to 48.

A buttonhole is cut in the middle of the hem of the pocket, and overcast with No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle, and worked with No. 40 cotton and No. 9 needle.

The initials are to be worked in the centre of the pocket, 1/2 in. below the hemstitching; work with embroidery silk, in cross-stitch or outline-stitch (see questions and answers 50 to 53). The age is worked in the same way, below the initials.

A row of double feather-stitching is made around the pocket, at the option of the pupil.

The pocket is basted to the centre of the sampler and hemmed on with No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle.

XVII

A stay is placed on the wrong side of the sampler (see questions and answers 56 to 58), where the button is to be sewed on. This is hemmed with No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle.

The button is sewed on with No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle (white cloth sampler, Fig. 51).

Fig. 51.   Sampler No. 3.

Fig. 51. - Sampler No. 3.

Questions And Answers

1. What number cotton and needle are used for all bastings on this sampler? Ans. No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used for basting on the white sampler.

2. What seam is made first on the bleached or white cloth sampler?

Ans. On the bleached sampler the oversewed seam is made first.

3. What number cotton and what number needle are used for the oversewing? Ans. No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle are used for the oversewing.

4. For hemming the sampler, what cotton and needle are used?

Ans. For hemming the sampler, No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle are used.

5. For sewing the hemmed-on patch, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For sewing a hemmed-on patch, No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle are used.

6. For sewing the stitched-in patch, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For stitching the patch, No. 60 cotton and a No. 9 needle are used; and No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for the overcasting.

7. What number cotton and what number needle are used for the first part of the French seam? Ans. No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle are used for the first part of the French seam.

8. What number cotton and what number needle are used for stitching the French seam? Ans. For stitching the French seam, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

9. For the oversewed patch, what cotton and what needle are used?

Ans. No. 60 cotton and a No. 10 needle are used for oversewing the patch, and No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for overcasting it. 10. How should a torn or cut place be prepared for darning? Ans. The edges of the cut or tear should be caught together as evenly as possible by fine overcasting on the wrong side, particular care being taken at the corners (Fig. 52); then a straight line of basting stitches should be made all around the tear, 1/4 inch from the joined edges, to mark where the lines of darning end (Fig. 53).

II. What number cotton and what number needle are used for the darn on the sampler? Ans. No. 100 cotton and No. 12 needle are used for the darning on the sampler. Show this preparation for darning on the blackboard.

12. How is the torn place darned after being prepared in this way? Ans. Straight lines of fine stitches are made back and forth from one guiding basting to the other, leaving a very small loop at each turning. (See canvas sampler, Fig. 54.)

Questions And Answers 58

Fig. 52.

Questions And Answers 59

Fig. 53.

Questions And Answers 60