Fig. 54.

13. How are the corners darned? Ans. The lines of running stitches are made slanting instead of straight, so that they all come together at the corner of the inside basting. (Illustrate on the blackboard.)

14. Why are the little loops left? Ans. The little loops are left to allow for drawing or shrinking. (Represent such a darn on the blackboard.)

15. Is the basting left in after the darning is finished? Ans. No; the bastings are cut at every third or fourth stitch and carefully drawn out.

16. Should a dam be made on the right or the wrong side of the cloth?

Ans. Generally, a darn should be on the wrong side of the cloth.

17. What number cotton and what number needle are used for stitching the fell? Ans. For stitching the fell, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

18. For hemming the fell, what cotton and needle are used? Ans. For hemming the fell, No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

19. For overcasting buttonholes, what cotton and what needle are used?

Ans. For overcasting buttonholes, No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle are used.

20. For working buttonholes, what cotton and what needle are used?

Ans. For working buttonholes, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

21. What number cotton and what number needle are used for the gusset on the sampler? Ans. For sewing a gusset on the sampler, No. 60 cotton and No. 10 needle are used for oversewing, No. 70 cotton and No. 10 needle for hemming.

22. What number cotton and what number needle are used for gathering?

Ans. For gathering, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

23. For stitching gathers into a band, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For stitching gathers into a band, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

24. For hemming the band down and oversewing the ends, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For hemming and oversewing the band, No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

25. For sewing the button on the band, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For sewing the button on the band, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

26. For hemming cambric ruffles, what cotton and what needle are used?

Ans. For hemming cambric ruffles, No. 100 cotton and No. 12 needle are used.

27. What is a ruffle? Ans. A ruffle is a strip of cloth gathered on one edge and hemmed on the other, which is then sewed to a plain piece of cloth.*

28. What is the use of a ruffle? Ans. A ruffle is used to trim, and sometimes to lengthen a garment.

29. What number cotton and what number needle are used for gathering the narrow ruffle? Ans. For gathering the narrow ruffle, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

30. For stitching the ruffled piece to the plain piece, what cotton and what needle are used? Ans. For stitching on the ruffled piece, No. 50 cotton and No. 9 needle are used.

31. What needle and cotton are used for sewing the bias facing to the narrow ruffle? Ans. No. 60 cotton and No. 9 needle for the stitching part; No. 10 needle and No. 70 cotton for the hemming part. 32. How is herringbone or cat-stitch made? Ans. A knot is made in the thread and the needle is brought up from the under side of the work, at the point nearest the person, as this stitch is usually worked upward or from the worker; it is sometimes worked from left to right. The work is held over the first finger of the left hand, kept in place with the second finger and thumb. The thread is first drawn through, then the needle is put through 1/8 in. to the right and 1/4 in. above and brought up again 1/8 in. below perpendicularly, care being taken to keep the thread at the left of the needle. The needle is next put through 1/8 in. to the left and 1/4 in. above, and the stitch made in the same manner, keeping the thread to the right of the needle. The third stitch is to the left and above, as before (Fig. 55).

* When gathering a ruffle with a raw edge for a heading, always gather on the under or wrong side. When gathering a ruffle with a finished heading, or a dress skirt, gather on the upper or right side, beginning on the right-hand end, for both upper and under side. Then the long end of the gathering thread will be at the left end of the part gathered, and the work can be easily drawn into place.

33. How is a hem blind-stitched? Ans. A hem is blind-stitched by catch-ing the under part of the first fold down to the single cloth below it, with running stitches, so that no stitches show on the upper side.

34. What stitch is used to ornament the hem after blind-stitching it?

Ans. To ornament the hem, feather or vine stitching is used.

35. How is feather or vine stitch made? Ans. A knot is made in the thread, and the needle is brought up from the under side of the work, at the point farthest from the person, as feather-stitch is always worked downward or toward the worker. The work is held over the first finger of the left hand, kept in place with the second finger and thumb. The thread is drawn through, then placed under the thumb while the next stitch is taken; the needle is put through to the under side 1/8 in. to the right and a trifle below the place where it was brought up, and brought up again 1/8 in. perpendicularly; the thread is drawn through until caught in the loop formed by the thread held under the thumb. The next stitch is made in the same manner 1/8 in. to the left and a trifle below, the third stitch to the right and below, and so on. This is the simplest form of feather-stitch, which may be varied in many ways, as shown by the illustrations (Figs. 56 to 57). In describing the so-called "buttonhole stitch" of embroidery, it is spoken of as an embroidery edge stitch, so that the child may^not associate it with buttonholes, and be tempted, by the ease of making, to use it for them.

Questions And Answers 61