In the present day a bag is no longer merely a bag, but it is a very important accessory to the well-dressed woman. The shape, style, and colour are carefully considered, with a view to suiting tin-costume with which it is to be used. Such a one can quite easily be made, and will give a very distinctive look. The bag here illustrated was made of satin of a pretty mole shade to match the dress of the wearer. The simple diagonal stitching was done in soft embroidery silk of the same colour, and at the points of intersection a coral bead was sewn. This touch of brighter colour matched the coral trimming in costume and hat. The cord and tassels were of the mole shade. A bag of this kind is quite simple to make, and practically any colour or material could be used

A Bag To Match Your Costume 140

For this cloth a square of Hardanger or Congress Canvas of medium mesh is required, and the work is done in Faudel's Vivid Lustre for the solid work, and Faudel's Sylkoline for the weaving.

Commence the work about 6 inches from the outside edge, and 120 threads from the middle of a side. Begin at the lowest point of the 1st diamond, and work 11 blocks of 5 stitches over 4 threads. Continue this up and down for the 4 diamonds, working the top halves to correspond, and leaving 4 threads between the 2 blocks in the middle of each. To turn the corner, work a 2nd row of blocks by the side of the upper half of the last diamond, which row forms the 1st side of the diamond for the 2nd side of the cloth. The blocks of the lower half of the 2 diamonds are continued in a straight line across the corner, - there must be an extra block worked in the space between the two halves of the last diamond, so that there will be 11 blocks on each side of this extra block in this straight row.

THE FINISHED CLOTH LOOKS VERY HANDSOME.

THE FINISHED CLOTH LOOKS VERY HANDSOME.

Continue the diamonds, 4 on each side, around the cloth, then work in the small inner diamonds. These consist of 6 blocks at each side of the diamond, and care must be taken to work them exactly opposite the corresponding blocks in the outer diamonds, so that the threads are correct for the openwork. The crosses are then filled in, beginning in the centre hole, 6 stitches are taken on the diagonal, each stitch being raised a mesh, and the 2nd row of each point being taken into the same hole as the first. The eyelet holes are worked at each side in the space between the points.

Next fill in the triangles at the outside of the diamonds with halves of stars, making the stitches of the lower side level with the lowest block of the diamond. Fill in the single eyelet holes between the points of the star, and then work 4 eyelet holes together, making the inside stitches of all 4 meet in 1 hole, which forms a small hole in the centre.

Each side of the diamonds is next outlined with 3 rows of backstitching, making each row finish in the same row of the mesh as the lowest block of the diamond. An eight-pointed star is worked on the outside of each corner.

When the solid work is completed, the threads are cut for the woven and whipped bars, which are worked in the spaces between the inner and outer diamonds, the whipping and weaving being worked in alternate diamonds. For the woven bars the threads are cut at the sides of all the blocks, and those left are woven with a picot in the middle of each side of each bar. For the whipped bars there are more threads left than cut. They are cut at the side of the middle block of the inner diamond.

Leave uncut the next 2 sides of the blocks round the diamond, cut the sides of the next 2, leave uncut the sides of the end block, and repeat this scheme around the inner diamond. Then cut the same threads on the inside of the outer diamond, draw the threads and whip.

SHOWING HOW THE CORNER IS MANAGED.

SHOWING HOW THE CORNER IS MANAGED.

THIS SHOWS THE DETAIL OF THE DIAMONDS.

THIS SHOWS THE DETAIL OF THE DIAMONDS.

Next the 4 threads are drawn for the openwork rows at each side of the insertion, leaving 5 threads between the half stars and the 1st drawn thread.

At the inner side of the corner a set of 4 blocks must be arranged to hold the cut ends of these threads. This will not exactly fit into the double row of blocks in the corner, but the sides must be made to face the threads which are to be cut. The outside row must be held in some such way as is shown in the illustration, or it could be carried right across the hem. The threads are then worked in sets of 3 bars - a whipped one on each side of woven one, and the three are then drawn together by small stitches at the back. Except in very fine canvas, it will be found sufficient to whip 3 threads together, and weave two, as, if more are taken, the effect is clumsy when drawn together.

Braid Applique affords an easy method for ornamenting the fine white net now so fashionable, and some of the designs here illustrated give some idea of the variety that can be obtained in this way. The braid is sewn on the wrong side to the net in any simple design, then the net may be pleated or tucked to form a frill, or the work may be - and very often is - further embellished by the addition of fine crochet.

In most of the designs shown, the tiny picot or Mignardise Braid (also known as a fine Cordon Braid) has been used in this way; while in one, a rather coarser braid has been used as well. In two of the corners, which would make handsome finishes for net curtains, fine Feather-stitched Braid has been employed. For blouse trimmings, jabots, collars, etc, Honiton Lace Braid can be used with remarkably good effect. Braid can also be applied to cambric or table linen. Some of the illustrations show suitable sprays for this. Others will doubtless suggest themselves to the worker. Although the crochet is not necessary in every case, the work is improved by it, and we give directions for it.