It really seems nowadays as if needlework and embroidery were made so simple that most effective results can be produced with a minimum of trouble and difficulty. In the new Baro work, of which some exquisite samples are illustrated on these pages, there is no drawing of threads that is so trying to the eyes. All that are required are a little care and patience, and the work is quite within the possibilities of anyone who can do buttonhole stitch and binding stitch, which is simply an over and over stitch.

A CUSHION COVER IN BARO EMBROIDERY.

A CUSHION COVER IN BARO EMBROIDERY.

A Handsome copyright Design, by the Broderie Russe Co.

A Handsome copyright Design, by the Broderie Russe Co.

Materials Required

The materials required are few and simple. First there is the design, which can be bought ready traced on to the material for d'oilies, tea-cloths, cushion-covers, or practically anything else. Then a sharp pair of embroidery scisso.rs will be required, a crewel needle, and some Baro embroidery thread.

How The Work Is Done

The first thing to do is to buttonhole stitch the design all round (binding stitch may be used for this part of the work if preferred, but buttonholing is the most general). This must be done before any of the cutting is commenced, or the material will fray and be spoilt. Now take the scissors and snip along the lines marked in the diagram AA to BB. Around the little bar thus formed, sew firmly over and over in simple binding stitch, keeping the point of the needle in the hand and working with the other end, as this is so much easier. When this bar is finished, cut on the adjoining lines C D, and work in the same way. Continue to work in this way over the cloth. It is really best to snip the bars for the width of the work first, as it is then possible to continue sewing over and over without stopping to cut in between. When the other side of the cloth is reached. snip down the next set of lines and work back again in the same way.

Over the vertical bars E (which are formed by the previous stitches, and do not need to be cut), the same over and over stitch is worked, and a cross-stitch is made where the horizontal and vertical bars intersect one another.

Any further embroidery stitches can now be added to the solid part of the design, and a most suitable finish to this handsome work is an edge of Cluny lace.

Diagram showing method of working.

Diagram showing method of working.

As will be seen from the samples of work we illustrate, the background mesh can be varied, some being squares, some more oblong, etc. A clever worker soon gets to make many varieties.

Where To Get The Requisites

This work is suitable for various purposes, and looks very beautiful when made into curtains or bedspreads. But the worker who does not want to attempt so much at the start may be glad to know that it is equally effective made up into small er articles, and designs can be purchased traced for d ' oilies and tray-cloths, nightdress cases, etc. These designs and all requisites for the embroidery can be obtained from the Broderie Russe Co., 289, Regent Street, London, W.

A finished piece of work, from a copyright design by the Broderie Russe Co.

A finished piece of work, from a copyright design by the Broderie Russe Co.

One of the admirable qualities of this work is its durability. Whereas drawn threads often weaken the fabric, no matter how beautiful the design,

Starting a piece of work.

Starting a piece of work.

Baro embroidery strengthens the fab r i c, and gives it an added lease of life, since every thread in the back-ground is gone over again with the embroidery thread.

The interesting variation in the background of the cushion cover design on page 29 is given by catching two bars together in the middle. Notice too, in this handsome piece of work, the various methods that have been employed for filling in the leaves, hardly any two being alike.

An effective little square made by darning filet crochet

An effective little square made by darning filet crochet-.