We have all made cushions, and we have all finished them off in the ordinary way, with a frill or a cord, and probably we have wished we knew of some other way we could finish them for a change. There are quite a lot of other ways. A few are shown and described here, and as you will easily see, they can all be enlarged and improved upon, and you will doubtless think of a good many more things that you can do with the edges of your cushion covers.

First of all, and probably one of the most beautiful, is the cushion cover with the fringed ends shown. The sides are finished with a little fancy stitching that completely covers the seams, and the ends are fringed by unravelling the weft of the linen and knotting the warp. This makes a beautiful setting for the handsome piece of embroidery. A working detail, showing how to start the fringe, is shown, and full dire c -tions as to how to make fringes appear on another page in this volume. This is quite one of the simplest of fringes, and yet most effective.

A very simple stitch In embroidery silk,

A very simple stitch In embroidery silk.

Some very attractive finishings may be obtained by the use of embroidery stitches, using several strands of embroidery silk, and employing quite simple stitchery. The three examples shown would be quite easy to work, and the addition of a tassel at the corner is in good taste. These are all shown with the edges opened flat, that it may be more easily seen how they are worked. These stitches of course quite cover the seams.

An edge of this kind makes a good finish

An edge of this kind makes a good finish.

This quite hides the seam, and is most effective.

This quite hides the seam, and is most effective.

A crochet finish with the two edges laced together.

A crochet finish with the two edges laced together.

Again, crochet can be successfully employed for this purpose. In the crochet specimens two patterns are illustrated, each of which is shown opened flat and also closed. Where a cushion cover is of canvas, a crocheted edge of the same colour as the work on the cushion is most suitable. A little finish is crocheted on all the sides, and the crochet edges are then laced together either with very fine cord or a length of chain.

A good edge for a Canvas Cushion Cover.

A good edge for a Canvas Cushion Cover.

To make the edge shown on the canvas specimen, fold over the raw edge, work d c round the edge, putting them close together at the corner.

2nd Row. -* 2 tr into d c, 2 ch, miss 1 d c. Repeat from *, No d c's are to be missed at the corners. When the crochet is finished, lace the edges together.

This shows the abov finish with the two edges opened flat.

This shows the abov finish with the two edges opened flat.

A great ad van tage of this simple lacing is that it can easily be undone, and the cushion slipped out for the cover to be laundered, no further fastening being necessary.

A cover of the design above with the edges laced.

A cover of the design above with the edges laced.

The other crochet edging is co m -m enced by turning in the edge and working buttonhole stitch all round, making the work ' closer at the corners.

1st Row. - * 1 d c in each of first 4 buttonhole stitches, 4 ch, 1 long tr in each of 2 next stitches. 4 ch.

Commencing the Fringe for the  design below.

Commencing the Fringe for the- design below.

Repeat from *, 2nd Row. -Into 1st space made by long tr and ch of previous row, put * 1 long tr. 3 ch. 1 tr, miss the next space, and into the next put 1 tr, 3 ch, 1 long tr . Repeat from *. Then lace the edges together.

The fancy edge on the inner side is made by catching each buttonholed thread and working into each stitch like one side of ordinary feather-stitching.

A Handsome Cushion. The side seams are hidden by the embroidery stitching, and the ends are fringed.

A Handsome Cushion. The side seams are hidden by the embroidery stitching, and the ends are fringed.

This work is so called because it is a revival of some old Greek work, done by the peasants of Rhodes Island, of which some very beautiful specimens may be seen in the Victoria and Albert Museum. In this work, however, the effect is produced by the threads being drawn out, but no difficulty caused by the drawing of threads presents itself to the modern worker of Rhodes Embroidery. The threads are simply forced apart with a very coarse needle, and then bound with a strong linen thread.

SHOWING THE WORK BEING DONE

SHOWING THE WORK BEING DONE.

Materials Required

The requisites necessary for this work are the design, which can be obtained ready stamped on the material for working, an embroidery needle for outlining the design, embroidery cotton, a "Rhodes" needle, for punching the holes and binding the threads, and some strong linen thread for this part of the work.

Fig. 1.

A

1

2

3

4

5

6

A

B

7

8

9

10

11

12

B

C

13

14

15

16

17

18

C

Fig. 2.

C

B

A

D

13

7

1

D

E

14

8

2

E

15

9

3

16

10

4

17

11

5

18

12

6

C

B

A

With "Rhodes" Needle under and out at 7.

INTO

1

OUT AT

7

AA BB

"

1

"

8

"

"

"

8

"

2

"

9

"

3

"

9

"

3

"

10

"

4

"

10

"

4

"

11

"

5

»1

11

"

5

!?

12

"

6

"

12

"

6

J1

18

"

12

"

18

"

12

"

17

AND SO ON

Method Of Working

The first step is to outline the design, and obviously the larger the design is, the less space there is to be taken up by the openwork in the background. This outlining is done with the embroidery cotton, and is a perfectly simple matter.

Now for the openwork, tie an end of linen thread into the eye of a "Rhodes" needle, and bring it from the wrong, through the right side of the work at the 1st dot in the 2nd row - or dot 7 on the diagram; push it through to the wrong side on the dot immediately above (dot 1). Bring it up at the 2nd dot of the 2nd row (dot 8). Then push it down again at the 2nd dot of the 1st row (dot 2) and up on the 3rd dot of the 2nd row (dot 9).

A DESIGN FOR A TEA COSY IN RHODES EMBROIDERY.

A DESIGN FOR A TEA COSY IN RHODES EMBROIDERY.

Following these instructions with the diagram, it will be seen that the method is one stitch on the perpendicular and one-stitch on the diagonal, the first of these ties the fabric threads, the second brings the needle in position for the next stitch. When the end of a row of dots is reached, start the row below. After tying the threads at dot 12, the needle put in at dot 6 is brought out at dot 18, and is thus in position for the next stitch. It is then put in at 12 and out at 18, again tying the threads, then in at 12 and out at 17, and so on.

When all is worked in this manner from A A to C C, reverse the material as in Fig. 2, and repeat the instructions working from D E to D E.

There is really not the slightest difficulty about this work, merely a

RHODES EMBROIDERY AS A BORDER.

RHODES EMBROIDERY AS A BORDER.

AN EXCEEDINGLY HANDSOME DESIGN IN RHODES EMBROIDERY.

AN EXCEEDINGLY HANDSOME DESIGN IN RHODES EMBROIDERY.

Tittle care being required to see that while the stitches are pulled firmly, they are not drawn so as to pucker the material. Cluny lace makes an excellent finish for this kind of work, which is sometimes called