Some girls may want to start something really useful and will like to attempt a hammock. Any strong kind of twine should be used for this, and a very big netting-needle. The hammock is netted obliquely, 40 loops in every row throughout the entire length of the hammock.

A Hammock in Miniature.

A Hammock in Miniature.

The foundation-loop should go over the foot, as the material is too heavy for pinning the work on to a weighted cushion. For netting the 1st and 2nd rows, a thin but strongly-bound book should be used as mesh. Then 35 to 40 rows (according to the length desired) are netted over a wooden mesh 1 1/2 inches wide, and the last 2 rows are again netted across the same book as was used for the first 2 rows. The foundation-loop should be moved from time to time as the work grows, threading it: through every mesh of the last but one completed row. This should be repeated whenever the work has grown to such a length as to be uncomfortably near the worker's face. When the netting of the hammock is complete, the final knot should be strengthened by an additional knot. The mesh should be withdrawn from the loop before securing this knot.

Now gather up all the loops of the last row in your left hand, run the twine 6 times through and join all six rings thus formed into one, either by crocheting or buttonholing (also with the twine). This makes an extra strong ring to fasten the hammock on to a tree. A similar ring should be made by taking up the loops of the 1st row. It will be found that they are "looped" at the end as they were netted on to the already withdrawn foundation-loop. These little knots are easily undone by stretching each loop separately. The end of twine at the very beginning of the netting should also be secured. And the two strong rings for the cord should be exactly alike at either end.