Hardanger Blouse Trimming

This pattern can be easily copied as it contains only the simplest of Hardanger stitches. The material used is white Hardanger linen. The outlines and darning are worked in "Bright-eye" weaving, lace stitch and crochet in "Gem Brighteye."

Counting The Threads

It makes the counting easier to run a piece of cotton over and under 4 threads of the linen for the size required. This also serves as a test of the accuracy of the work; a thread is so easily missed and then the outlines have to be done again.

Darning, After the outlines of the pattern are finished, run a thread under and over 2 threads across the linen between, miss 2 threads and repeat, starting the thread over this time. The satin stitch around is worked over 4 threads.

Lace Stitch

The lace stitch is done, when the 4 sides are finished, by working a buttonhole stitch into the 4 corners; then overcast each stitch, pulling the thread rather tightly.

Crochet Edge.

Turn the linen in, leaving 2 threads beyond the satin stitch, over this work d c, making the loops long enough to cover the linen edge. 6 d c, 5 ch, sl st back into 4th stitch, into loop work 5 d c, 1 picot, 5 d c.

A Brussels Braid Lace Collar

A Brussels Braid Lace Collar.

This most effective-looking lace is quite simple to make, and the work is very quickly executed. The design shown is from Mr. William Barnard, 126, Edgware Road, London, W.,and he is able to supply all the materials.

A fine Brussels net and the two varieties of lace braid shown will be needed to make the collar, also lace thread for filling-in purposes.

First tack the Brussels net over the design, and then place the fancy braid round the edge as shown in the illustration, whipping the inner side of each curve. Arrange the straight braid where required and fasten securely with a tiny hemming stitch. Then fill in the twisted bars where shown.

The small leaves are made by cutting the ovals of the fancy braid apart, and arranging them as the design indicates.

The straight braid is used for the flowers, and is arranged to form petals, the centres of which are filled in with cross bars. Any of the various lace stitches can be used for filling in the design.

After the work is completed remove it from the pattern, cutting away the surplus muslin, and press carefully with a warm iron.

A CORNER OF THE COLLAR.

A CORNER OF THE COLLAR.

Carrick-niacross lace, as its name denotes, is especi-a 11 y an Irishlace. It has known many v i c i s s i-tudes, but has sur-v i v e d them, and is even more popular today than ever. This lace is exceedingly beautiful, and, at the same time, so simple of execution that those who are not great workers can, by a little care and neatness, make h a n d -some and valuable lace.

FLOWERETS DESIGN.

FLOWERETS DESIGN.

Showing how the couching is done, after net and muslin are tacked over the design.

Showing how the couching is done, after net and muslin are tacked over the design.

Materials required.

These are few, but should be of the best quality.

They are Carrickmacross muslin, white or cream; Brussels net, square mesh, white or cream; lace scissors, with bulb on one point; needles, sizes 10 and 12; design; Carrickmacross cotton, white or cream, 60, 80, 150, 200. To commence the work, first lay the net on the design, and then the muslin, tacking through all these round and across, and then very carefully round the design, avoiding the actual lines of the pattern. This tacking is very essential, as it greatly improves the finish of the lace.

ZIG ZAG PATTERN.

ZIG-ZAG PATTERN.

Some of the Lace Stitches that can be used.

SIMPLE DARNED STITCH.

SIMPLE DARNED STITCH.

DOTS AND RUNNING STITCHES.

DOTS AND RUNNING STITCHES.

A Section of a Carrickmacross Lace Collar.

A Section of a Carrickmacross Lace Collar.

The top illustration shows how the work is started.

Working The Design

The worker must next find on her design a pattern where she can commence to work that will follow on as far as possible without breaking the cord, the 60 and 150 cotton work well together, or the 80 and 200. The coarser thread is for the top cord, the finer for the sewing over. Commence by putting down a long thread, and then with the finer thread sew the coarse thread with small slanting whipping-stitches to both muslin and net. This is called "couching."

Avoid cutting the outlining thread as much as possible by turning back and sewing the two threads together if necessary. It will be noticed that the thread is usually turned into a picot at the edges. This is done by turning a loop on the thread, and securing it in place with a couple of neat stitches in the centre.

A ROBESPIERRE COLLAR.

A ROBESPIERRE COLLAR.

THE FINISHED WORK IS VERY EFFECTIVE.

THE FINISHED WORK IS VERY EFFECTIVE.

After a sufficiently long piece is worked, then cut out. This, of course, must be very carefully done, as the muslin must be cut away from the outside design, so as not to cut the net underneath. First pick up a little pieceof muslin, and then cut round the pattern, keeping the bunt side of the scissors against the net. The spaces can then be filled in with fancy stitches. Some of these are here illustrated. After the work is finished, take off the pattern and press with a warm iron, putting some thin material between the iron and the work.

The designs for collars, etc., can, of course, be bought on glazed linen or ready traced on Carrickmacross muslin. Or if you prefer to use your own design, you should copy it on a piece of stiff white paper, such, as drawing paper. Then go over it with pen and ink, rather heavily, and remove all trace of lead pencil carefully by rubbing with dry bread crumbs. Where to get Materials.

This work makes beautiful collars, cuffs, scarf ends, fans, d'oilies, handkerchiefs, lace, etc., and one of the illustrations shows a corner of a beautiful "Robespierre" collar.

You can get this design, also the pattern of lace illustrated and all the requisites for this work, from Mr. William Barnard, 126, Edgware Road, London, W.; also a large number of other designs for this handsome form of work.