AN EASILY MADE FRINGE.

AN EASILY-MADE FRINGE.

Knotted fringe, one of the many revived handicrafts, is coming very-much to the fore. And no wonder - for it is one of the most graceful additions to pieces of stitchery. The rejuvenation of the craft is heartily welcomed by all who treasure some lovely old fringe from "great-grandmamma's b o t t o m -drawer." And everybody who likes to turn out high-class workmanlike stitchery, will find in fringe-making not only a means of aiding materially to the beauty and value of her work, but also an art which offers large scope both for artistic taste and for manipulative skill.

The Origin Of Fringes

The original idea of fringe-making was to utilise the remnant of the warp. When a piece of material was finished in the loom, the last three-quarter yard of warp could not be filled in, as the machinery of the loom through which the warp was cunningly threaded hindered the shuttle from further work. However, it was found that the fringe looked pretty, and the idea to knot it came b y degrees.

It may be mentioned here that this was the beginning of another art, the one which developed into "pillow-lace." But this is by the way.

To return to the practical point of the question, knotted fringes are now made of various materials applied on the embroidery as well as by unravelling the weft and knotting the warp. In making it with the warp, the length and pattern should be decided upon before cutting out your material, and a piece of the material should be left free for the fringe. When the embroidery is finished, the woof should be unravelled, care being taken that the warp does not gettoo entangled. Remember that the knotting takes up a considerable length. It is advisable to allow an extratwo-thirds, i.e., if your fringe is to be 6 inches long the warp should be 10 i n c h e s, as the 4 inches will be taken up by the knots.

A TWINED FRINGE.

A TWINED FRINGE.

Knotting And Twining

Before beginning to knot the fringe, secure the piece of tapestry by means of some heavy weights laid on it. Equalise your tassels as much as possible, and when practicable count the threads of every tassel. (This can, of course, not be rigorously carried out when working on fine material). Make a knot on every "tassel," manipulating the knot with a bodkin or some such blunt implement. When the 1st row is knotted, every tassel should be equally divided, each half being joined on to the neighbouring half-tassel. The knot joining the 2 halves together is done as described above.

One variation is to twine 1 row: Divide tassel, twine tightly and the way of the thread (if twine d originally) each half separately, then bring the 2 halves round and round each other in the opposite direction to that in which they were first twined, h o 1 d i n g each ' twine' in place the whole time by just changing hands con-tinua11y; then secure the twine with a knot. When the pattern of the fringe is completed the edges should be eve n 1 y trimmed. Applied Fringe.

A VANDYKE FRINGE.

A VANDYKE FRINGE.

A knotted fringe can be applied on a piece of stitchery. Instead of unravelling the woof, a fringe can be added to it, and can be made of wool, silk, macrame-cotton, or whatever material may suit the work. But it must be remembered that since the fringe is meant to represent the warp, it should correspond both in thickness a n d in colour. If a wool twice as thick as the material is used for the warp, then one should allow 8 threads intervening space for every 4 threads of the fringe, and so on. For applied fringe cut all your strands the same length to begin with - twice as long as you want the fringe previous to knotting it. Mark out the spaces for threading in the fringe, or if a coarse material, such as canvas, count the threads. Now thread both ends of the fringe-strands into the needle and thread that through the material from the wrong side. Catch the loop with your left 1st finger and thread your needle through that. For the subsequent rows see directions above.

MAKING THE VANDYKE FRINGE.

MAKING THE VANDYKE FRINGE.

FRINGE NO. 3 IN THE MAKING.

FRINGE NO. 3 IN THE MAKING.

The Colour Of The Fringe

This should always be that of the actual or apparent warp of the material. By the "apparent" warp is meant any stitchery obviously meant to represent part of the warp, such as in various kinds of tapestry where long stitches are employed the way of the warp. Here the same colours can effectively be continued in the fringe. But where stitchery is obviously of the applied kind, it is in better taste to make the fringe entirely of the same colour as the material. .