One often has nice pieces of linen or other material left over, when making, 'that might be turned to good account. The tray-cloth, shown on page 93, was made from 2 pieces of plain tea-cloth linen that were over after some aprons had been cut out. The material is beautifully serviceable, but too stout to hem; so each piece was bound round with some narrow strips of nainsook - likewise cast aside for the piece-bag. These binding strips were feather-stitched round. A piece of simple Irish insertion took very little time to crochet, and used only a small amount of cotton. Ardern's No . 24 was used, as the coarser t h read went better than a finer one with the stout material. The whole was edged with some crochet.

A PRETTY ARRANGEMENT OF TENERIFFE WHEELS.

A PRETTY ARRANGEMENT OF TENERIFFE WHEELS.

No directions can be supplied foe this.

This is a very simple form of lace to make, and yet, when done, looks wonderfully effective. The design shown, being arranged in the form of a square, would be most suitable for the corner of a square collar, but it would be a perfectly simple matter to arrange the same design on an entirely different shaped foundation, and use it for a collar of any other shape, or for any other purpose desired.

A CORNER IN PRINCESS BRAID APPLIQUE.

A CORNER IN PRINCESS BRAID APPLIQUE.

The only materials required for this pretty work are some fine Brussels net, lace braid, some crochet cotton and fine lace thread. A row of pearl edging is often sewn round the edge of a collar to finish it off. This edging can be bought at any fancy work depot.

The sprays are formed of lobes of braid, with braid of a larger kind for the leaves, and the stems are worked in twist stitch with Ardern's No. 24 Lustrous Crochet Cotton.

First draw the design on paper, tack a piece of Brussels net over the paper, then apply the braid, and sew round with neat, even stitches, using very fine thread for the purpose.

It will easily be seen that by varying the arrangement of the braid, and even the braid itself, a variety of different designs can be obtained.

For instance, pretty flowers are made by using four or five loops of the plain lace braid (the kind used for the inside straight border of the design here illustrated), and working in the centre, where the loops meet, a group of French knots.

Then too, leaflets, and other small parts of designs, are sometimes worked in darning.

As mentioned above, a pearl edging whipped along the edge, makes a pretty finish for a collar, handkerchief border, or length of lace.