Paragraph 120. Catch stitching consists of short, even stitches alternately taken in two parallel lines. (This can best be seen by examining the underside of the material after a few stitches are completed.) In crossing over from one line to the other the thread falls on the right side of the cloth so as to form the crosses or herringbone effect at the ends of the stitches as shown in the illustration. See Figure 18.

Figure 17.

Figure 17.

By studying the illustration carefully you will see that the amount of cloth picked up on the needle each time to form a stitch is just equal to the distance between stitches on the other line. Watch this carefully; also keep the lines of stitches exactly the same distance apart so the work will be even. The manner of turning a corner is shown in Figure 19. This stitch may be worked from you, or from left to right; this is unimportant, but observe carefully that the stitches are always so taken that the needle points back over the finished stitches.

Catch stitching is used in a decorative way for finishing flannel seams, flannel patches and infants' garments. It is also employed in fancy needlework.