Paragraph 150. The over-hand, or set-in, patch consists of a piece of material (with its raw edges folded back on all sides) set into another piece of material.

To make this patch, cut away all of the worn material, preferably along the warp and woof threads, leaving an oblong or square opening. Select a piece of material for the patch as nearly as possible like the garment to be patched. Match the design carefully, laying the patch on the wrong side of the material with the right side turned toward the right side of the material. Make small diagonal cuts in the corners of the hole and turn the edges back on a thread about 1/4" all around the opening. Turn back the material along one edge of the patch (follow a thread if possible), where the design exactly matches the design in the torn place. Beginning a little way from one corner, overhand the edge of the patch and the edge of the opening together with very shallow stitches as in Figure 57; sew well into the corner, then turning the material half way round, fold the second edge of the patch to match the figure along the second edge of the opening and overhand along this edge as you did the first. Continue folding the patch and overhanding the edges together until all four sides of the opening have been overhanded to the patch, as in Figure 58.

Figure 57.

Figure 57.

Figure 58.

Figure 58.

Figure 59.

Figure 59.

The patch may be overhanded on the wrong side, but this method makes it much harder to match the figures. The under side of the patch should be finished neatly. To do this trim the under edges of the material until they are ex-actly parallel and about 1/4" wide. Overcast all the edges with neat overcasting stitches (Par. 113). See Figure 59.

This patch is not as strong and serviceable as a set-on patch, for it is joined to the opening with only one seam and the corners are held merely by a single thread. It may be used very satisfactorily, however, on thin goods like lawn, organdie, dimity or other very light materials in garments which are laundered only occasionally.