Paragraph 159. A placket is an opening left in a garment for convenience in putting it on, the raw edges being finished to keep it from tearing or raveling. Plackets are made in skirts, in the bottom of men's shirt sleeves and in the sleeves of ladies' tailored waists, for convenience in laundering.

A skirt placket should be sufficiently long to allow the skirt to slip easily over the head. As a rule, 9" to 12" are allowed, depending on the size of the person wearing the skirt and the fullness of the skirt, that is, the smaller the person or the narrower the skirt, the shorter the placket may be. Generally in a skirt, the upper end of a seam or pleat is left open for the placket, although in a gathered skirt or the bottom of a sleeve the opening is usually cut in the material. When the placket finishes the opening at the top of a seam, or pleat, it should appear to be a continuation of the same. A placket should open from right to left. It is usually held together with hooks and eyes, or snaps, the hooks and small parts of the snaps being sewed on the right side, the eyes and large parts of the snaps on the left, or under side.

Hemmed Placket

Figure 70.

Figure 70.

Paragraph 160. The hemmed placket consists of a lengthwise opening finished with a wide hem on the right edge lapped over the left edge which is finished with a narrow hem. To make this placket (Par. 159), if there is no opening, make a cut the length desired being careful to cut on a thread. After the opening is made, lap the right-hand edge over the left-hand edge about 3/4" and crease the fold formed. Turn in the raw edge, forming a hem about 5/8" wide; baste with even basting and sew in place with, the hemming stitch (Par. 114). The under side of the placket is simply a narrow hem turned toward the wrong side of the cloth. Make this hem about 3/16" wide at the top and about 1" from the bottom of the placket; begin to narrow it down to the fine point shown at the bottom of the hem as in No. 1, Figure 70. To finish the bottom of the placket, turn the garment right side out and sew across the bottom of the hems with two parallel rows of backstitching, or machine stitching. No. 2 shows the finished placket. It is usually unnecessary to sew fastenings on this style of placket, as there is but little strain on it

This placket is used in a gathered skirt, principally in children's dresses or in night gowns made with a yoke.

Bound Placket

Figure 71.

Figure 71.

Paragraph 161. The bound placket (Par. 159) consists of one strip of material the same as the garment, which is sewed on the placket opening double, in such a way as to bind the raw edges. To make it, cut a strip of material like the garment 2" wide and a tritle longer than twice the length of the opening left at the top of the seam. Lay the right side of the strip on the right side of the material with the long edge even with the edge of the opening. If the placket is made at the end of a French seam, cut almost across the top of the seam, being very careful not to cut too far. Baste the edge of the strip to the edge of the opening making the end of the stitching in the seam just touch the line on which the placket is to be stitched. (No. 1, Figure 71, shows the strip basted in place.) When you sew across the top of the seam the needle should barely catch the edge of the cloth at the seam. On an overcast or plain seam it is often necessary to drop the edge of the binding strip below the edge of the placket opening, beginning about 1" each side of the seam in order to keep the stitching even on the strip and still catch in the end of the seam. If too much of the cloth at the seam is sewed into the binding strip, the bottom of the placket will pucker. Continue to baste the strip around the opening, running the two edges together again, if necessary. Stitch in place or sew on by hand with the combination stitch (Par. 108). Turn the edge of the strip over about 1/8" toward the wrong side (see No. 1, Figure 71), then fold it over again until the edge lies just over the line of stitching. Hem neatly in place, or stitch on the sewing machine. As it is difficult to stitch this edge so that both sides will look equally well, when the last turning of the binding strip is stitched in place by machine, instead of by hand, the seams are generally turned toward the right side. Trim the top of the strip even with the top of the skirt. No. 2 in Figure 71, shows the completed placket open.

Extension Placket

Figure 72.

Figure 72.

Paragraph 162. The extension placket (Par. 159) consists of two narrow strips of material of the same goods as the garment in which the placket is to be made. One strip which is twice as wide as the first, is used to face the upper edge of the opening; the other is used to make an extension on the under edge of the placket. The seam should be left unsewed the desired distance at the top of the garment,

To make the placket, first cut one lengthwise strip 7/8" wide, about 1" longer than the opening, to face the upper edge. Cut the second lengthwise strip 1 1/2" wide, the same length as the opening plus 1" for the extension under the edge of the opening.

To put on the upper facing, lay the right side of the 7/8" strip on the right side of the skirt, with the edge even with the edge of the opening, allowing the top to extend slightly above it. Baste with even basting (Par. 103) and stitch in place with 1/4" seam, being careful to have this seam in an exact line with the stitching in the seam of the skirt. Turn the long edge of the facing under 1/8" and turn under the bottom as much as is necessary to make it even with the top of the seam. Baste with even basting and hem in place (Par. 114), or, if the placket is made on an under garment, it may be stitched on the sewing machine. No. 1, in Figure 72, shows the facing and the extension piece partially basted.

To set on the extension piece, lay the right side of the 1 1/2" strip on the right side of the material allowing it to extend slightly above the top with the edge even with the long edge of the opening. Turn up the bottom end until it is exactly even with the facing on the upper edge of the opening. Sew the two edges together (with machine stitching or the running stitch, Par. 106), with a 1/4" seam, which should continue the line of stitching in the seam of the skirt. Turn the extension piece back even with the stitching on the wrong side, first turning the lower edge in about 1/4". Baste carefully in place and hem down by hand, or stitch on the right side, with the sewing machine if the skirt is an undergarment. Overhand the bottom edge of the extension piece to the bottom edge of the facing, and trim the top even with the skirt. Turn the garment right side out and stitch across the bottom of the placket pieces with two parallel rows of machine stitching, or backstitching (Chap. II, Par. 107). No. 2 in Figure 72 shows the right side of the completed placket.