Paragraph 151. The material with the hole in it, as shown in No. 1, Figure 60, is a part of a boy's pocket which had worn through because of the load of marbles carried in it. The patch used to mend it is made the same as the hemmed patch previously described, except that the wrong side is catch stitched (Par. 120) in place without turning in the raw edges. The material is cut away to a strong place, as shown in No. 2, Figure 60, then a patch which matches the material as nearly as possible is basted under the hole. The diagonal stripes of the ma-terial should be matched carefully, the corners of the opening cut in slightly, the edges turned in, basted and hemmed in place. To finish the wrong side of the patch, trim the edges about 3/4" from the hole and without turning under the raw edges, catch stitch them in place. In patching the seat or knees of a boy's trousers, or any place where there is likely to be considerable hard wear, it may be desirable to let the edges of the patch extend farther beyond the hole. If the material in the patch ravels easily, the edges may be turned under, and hemmed down. On material which does not ravel easily the patch may be basted on the wrong side of the material and the raw edges of the hole darned smoothly onto the patch; the wrong side of the patch is then finished as already described.

Figure 60.

Figure 60.

The woolen patch is used in mending holes worn or torn in woolen garments in such a way that they cannot be darned, or mended satisfactorily with mending tissue.

Figure 61.

Figure 61.