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School Sewing Based On Home Problems | by Ida Robinson Burton, Myron G. Burton



The most striking feature of the modern educational system is the atmosphere of practical application which surrounds every line of its endeavor. Educators have come to realize that the surest approach to the child's mind is through the light of his experience. They are therefore striving to utilize the impressions gathered outside the classroom in motivating some of the mental gymnastics which, heretofore, have been sheerest abstractions. Not only has the scope of the curriculum been extended in such a way as to include the subjects founded upon home and community problems, but the very manner of dealing with those subjects themselves has undergone a change consistent with the general scheme of making the child's experience the constant handmaid to his training.

TitleSchool Sewing Based On Home Problems
AuthorIda Robinson Burton, Myron G. Burton
PublisherGinn And Company
Year1916
Copyright1916, Ginn And Company
AmazonSchool Sewing Based On Home Problems

By

Ida Robinson Burton, B.S.

Former Director Home Economics, Muncie Normal Institute

And

Myron G. Burton, A.B.

Director Home-Study Service, Kansas State Agricultural College Author of "Shop Projects Based on Community Problems"

School Sewing Based On Home Problems
-Preface
The most striking feature of the modern educational system is the atmosphere of practical application which surrounds every line of its endeavor. Educators have come to realize that the surest approac...
-Home Problems
The Most severe criticism which is being brought upon our public schools today comes from professional men, great captains of industry, and those who have devoted their lives to the practical problems...
-Suggestions To Teachers
The Following suggestions to teachers are intended to give a broad conception of the underlying principles upon which this text is founded and to offer means by which it can be made most effective in ...
-Suggestions To Teachers. Continued
At the close of the introductory statement a number of references will be found. The purpose of these references is to cite authority to which students may refer for kindred information. Students are ...
-Instructions To Students
When You undertake this work in sewing it will seem a little strange to you at first for it is somewhat different from the regular class work which you have been doing at school. In this work you will...
-Introduction To Section I
Section I Deals with the most elementary processes of hand sewing. The lessons set forth in this section will be found suitable for sixth or seventh grade girls who have had no previous systematic tra...
-Needle Book
Materials Art Canvas (Chap. I. Par. 8). Outing Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 30) or Felt (Chap. I. Par. 58). 1 piece art canvas 41/2 x 61/2. 1 piece outing flannel, or felt, 6 x 7. Crewel or raff...
-Wash Cloth
Materials Turkish Toweling (Chap. I, Par. 35). 1 piece Turkish toweling 14 square. San silk, or similar mercerized cotton the color desired. Crewel or embroidery needle No. 5. Introductory Sta...
-Hand Towel
Materials Crash Toweling. (Chap. I, Par. 44). 1/2 yard crash toweling. 4 1/2 white cotton tape, 3/8 or 1/2 wide. White thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement There are a great...
-Handkerchief Case
Materials White, Figured or Plain Colored Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23) or Dimity (Chap. I, Par. 15). 1/2 yd. lawn or dimity at least 18 wide. 1 1/2 yds. lace about 5/8 wide. White cardboard, 7 1/2...
-Sewing Apron
Materials Batiste (Chap. I, Par. 2). 1/2 yd. batiste or any soft, plain colored material. 1 1/2 yds. ribbon. San silk or mercerized embroidery cotton. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement Sin...
-Book Cover
Materials Butcher's Linen (Chap. I, Par. 42). Linen Crash (Chap. I, Par. 44). 1 piece of linen 1 longer than length of book and 8 wider than twice the width of the book to be covered, measuring ...
-Button Bag
Materials Linen Crash (Chap. I, Par. 44). Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19). 1 piece linen crash or checked gingham 9 wide, 22 long. Embroidery floss or san silk (colored) with embroidery needle to c...
-Hair Receiver
Materials Cretonne (Chap. I, Par. 12).. 1 piece of cretonne 7xl4. 1 piece of featherbone 9 long. San silk or embroidery cotton to harmonize with the cretonne. 2 small rings. 1 crewel or emb...
-Holder
Materials Chambray (Chap. I, Par. 9) or Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19). Outing Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 30). 1 piece chambray or gingham 10x27. 1 piece outing flannel 9xl4. 1 yard 3/8 cotton ta...
-Child's Bib
Materials Huckaback (Chap. I, Par. 20 or 47). 1 piece of huckaback 12 x l4. Embroidery floss (color desired) crewel or embroidery needle to correspond. 2 buttons. Thread No. 50. Needle No. 6. ...
-Child's Bib. Continued
Working The Scallops And The Design Work the scallops with blanket stitch (Chap. II, Par. 128), placing the stitches close together. If the edge of the material is not cut away until after the bib is...
-Introduction To Section II
BY the time the students have completed Section I, they should be pretty familiar with the most common forms of simple stitches, but skill and judgment in the application of even the most elementary p...
-Filing Pocket
Materials Brown gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19) or Brown Chambray (Chap. I, Par. 9) or Linen crash (Chap. I, Par. 44). Cretonne (Chap. I, Par. 12). 1 piece linen, gingham or chambray, 12 wide x 28...
-Sleevelets
Materials White Cotton Cambric (Chap. I, Par. 6). Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). 1 piece white goods 1/3 yard long and 27 wide. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. 1 yard narrow white elastic. Intr...
-Cap
Materials Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23) or Cotton Cambric (Chap. I, Par. 6) or Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). 1 piece of white wash goods about 21 square. 1 yard of lace. 3/4 yard of elastic 1/8 w...
-Silver Case
Materials Outing flannel (Chap. I, Par. 30) or Felt (Chap. I, Par. 58) or Canton Flannel (Chap. 1, Par. 7). 1/2 yard flannel or felt. 3/4 yard of tape to match material. Cotton or silk thread ...
-School Bag
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40). Chambray (Chap. I, Par. 9)- 1 piece of chambray or linen 14 1/2 x 36. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. 1 yard white cotton tape about 1 wide. Stencil pattern...
-Broom Cover
Materials Canton Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 7). 1/2 yard canton flannel. 2 yards cotton tape 1/2 wide. Colored embroidery cotton (if desired). Embroidery needle to correspond. White thread No. 60...
-Crocheted Turban
Materials 5 skeins of Saxony yarn the color desired. 1 bone crochet hook to correspond with yarn. 2 large wooden button molds. 2 rubber bands, or short pieces of heavy string. Introductory Stat...
-Darned Towel
Materials Huckaback Toweling (Chap. I, Pars. 20 and 47). 1 1/4 yards huckaback. San silk, or mercerized embroidery cotton in two shades. Blunt pointed needle to cor-respond. Introductory Statem...
-Dresser Scarf
Materials Mull (dotted) (Chap. I, Par. 26). 1 yard dotted mull, 18 wide. 1 3/4 yard lace insertion 2 wide. 2 1/4 yards lace edging about 2 1/4 wide. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Introductor...
-Kitchen Apron
Materials Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31) or, Gingham (Chap.I,Par. 19) or, Chambray, (Chap. I, Par. 9) or, Calico (Chap. I, Par. 5). 1 yard 36 wash goods, or 2 yards in a narrower width. 1 1/2 yards ...
-Introduction To Section III
The projects set forth in this section are a little more advanced than those of the preceding sections, but if students have given careful attention to the detail of the fundamental processes they wil...
-Traveling Case
Materials Cretonne (Chap. I, Par. 12). 1/2 yard cretonne at least 17 wide. 1/2 yard white rubber lining, same width (if used). 1 1/2 yards bias tape 3/8 wide. 1 snap. Thread No. 70. Needle ...
-Embroidered Napkin
Materials Damask Linen (Chap. I, Par. 45). 1 table napkin. White Thread No. 80. Needle No. 9. Fine embroidery cotton. Padding cotton. Embroidery needle. Introductory Statement Fine linen gives a...
-Shop Apron
Materials Denim (Chap. I, Par. 14). 3/4 yard Denim. 2 yards mercerized tape. White thread No. 50. Needle No. 6. Introductory Statement When working in the manual training shop, it is quite neces...
-Ironing Board Cover
Materials Muslin (Chap. I, Par. 27). 2 yards muslin (unbleached). 4 yards tape. White thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. 1 piece drafting paper, 30x62. Introductory Statement It is very importan...
-Clothes Pin Apron
Materials Ticking (Chap. I, Par. 34; or Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19). 1 yard ticking or gingham. 30 bias tape 3/8 wide. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement Wash day at its best ...
-Scalloped Towel
Materials Huckaback (Chap. I, Par. 47) or Damask (Chap. I, Par. 45). 1 1/4 yards of linen toweling. Embroidery cotton. Embroidery needle. Introductory Statement Since the ends of the towels mus...
-Fancy Apron
Materials Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23). 1 1/4 yards lawn. Thread No. 90. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement As there are so many uses for small aprons, it is very desirable to have several of them....
-Bedroom Slippers
Materials 2 skeins Germantown yarn (color desired). 1 skein Germantown yarn (white or contrasting color). 1 pair slipper soles (size desired). 1 bone hook. Thread No. 60. Needle No. 5. Introd...
-Handmade Handkerchief
Materials Handkerchief Linen (Chap. I, Par. 46). 1 piece handkerchief linen 11 square. 6-strand D. M. C. embroidery cotton No. 25. Fine steel crochet hook. Thread No. 80. Needle No. 9. Intro...
-Corset Cover
Materials 1 1/4 yards all-over embroidery. 1 strip lawn 3 wide and length of waist measure plus 2. 3 snaps. 1 hook and eye, or 3 buttons. 3/4 yard embroidery beading. 2 yards ribbon or linge...
-Corset Cover. Continued
Stitch the band to the corset cover, and peplum or drawers. If these are not attached, stitch all the way around the band. Remove all bastings. Fastenings You may sew three snaps on the hems and one...
-Introduction To Section IV
THIS section presents a number of modifications and developments of the elementary processes and principles set forth in the preceding sections. Students who have satisfactorily completed the work of ...
-Sash Curtains
Materials Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23) or Mull (Chap. I, Par. 26). Curtain material the length of window plus 4 1/2 for hems. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement Sash curtains are ...
-Laundry Bag
Materials Denim (Chap. I, Par. 14). 2/3 yard denim. 1 ruler 12 long or piece of window stick. 14 cotton tape. 1 yard mercerized braid. White embroidery cotton. Embroidery needle. Thread to...
-Pillow Case
Materials Muslin (Chap. I, Par. 27). 1 yard muslin, width desired for length of pillow case, or 1 yard pillow tubing. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Embroidery cotton. Padding cotton. Embroide...
-Sofa Pillow Cover
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40), in natural color. 32 art linen, 22 wide. 32 linen fringe. Embroidery cotton. Embroidery needle. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Introductory Statement The sof...
-Table Cover
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40). 1 1/2 yards Art linen 18 to 22 wide. 3 shades embroidery cotton. Black embroidery cotton. Embroidery needle. Linen colored thread for hemstitching. Intro...
-Guest Towel
Materials Huckaback (Chap. I, Par. 20 or 47) or Damask (Chap. I, Par. 13 or 45). 3/4 yard linen toweling. Embroidery cotton. Embroidery needle. Padding cotton. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Intro...
-Bungalow Apron
Materials Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19) or Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31), or Chambray (Chap. I, Par. 9). 3 yards of gingham, 30 or 36 wide. 1 2/3 yards rickrack. Thread No. 70. Needle No. 8. Patter...
-Cooking Apron
Materials Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). 1 piece long cloth twice as long as the skirt length plus 1 yard for bib and 9 for hem. Thread No. 70. 4 pearl buttons. 1 yard drafting paper for patte...
-Base Ball Suit
Materials Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 59). Muslin (Chap. 1, Par. 27). Amount of material called for in the pattern used. 1 yard of 2 linen belting. About 3/4 yard of 1/2 elastic. Commercial patte...
-Plain Petticoat
Materials Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). 1 piece long cloth or rep-plette, twice the length of the skirt plus twice the width of the hem. 1 piece bias tape the length of waist measure plus 1. T...
-Introduction To Section V
THE projects of this section deal almost entirely with garment making beginning with some of the elementary ones and leading up to the more advanced garments which are more fully dealt with in the nex...
-Combing Jacket
Materials Turkish Toweling (Chap. I, Par. 35). 1 turkish towel, 22 wide, 48 long. 2 1/2 yards ribbon (color desired). Rope embroidery floss to match ribbon. Introductory Statement A combing ...
-Night Gown
Materials Nainsook (Chap. I, Par. 28) or Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24) or Muslin (Chap. I, Par. 27). 1 piece of Nainsook twice the length of the measurement from shoulder to floor, plus 5 for h...
-Kimono
Materials Outing Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 30), or Silk (Chap. I, Par. 70). About 3 yards of 30 or 36 material. About 4 yards of narrower material. Introductory Statement While the kimono is wo...
-Crepe Kimono
No. 2. This kimono is made with a yoke on which the body of the kimono is shirred. The upper part of the kimono may be made from the kimono night gown pattern; the other part is simply made of three s...
-Princess Slip
Materials Nainsook (Chap. I, Par. 28), or Cambric (Chap. I, Par. 6), or Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). Nainsook, the amount called for in the pattern. Thread No. 90. Bias Tape. Snaps or butto...
-Ruffled Petticoat
Materials Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24). 1 piece of long cloth twice the length of the skirt, plus the width of the hem. About 2 1/4 yards embroidery (amount will depend on fullness of ruffle and...
-Cambric Corset Cover
Materials Cambric (Chap. I, Par. 6), or Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24) or Nainsook (Chap. I, Par. 28). About 1 yard of cambric. About 2 1/2 yards of embroidery beading. Thread No. 70. 1 hook a...
-Drawers
Materials Cambric (Chap. I Par. 6), or Long Cloth (Chap. I, Par. 24), or Nainsook (Chap. I, Par. 28). 1 1/2 to 2 yards of material. Embroidery (1 1/4 times width of the two legs). Thread 70-90...
-Pajamas
Materials Outing Flannel (Chap. I, Par. 30). Nainsook (barred) (Chap. I, Par. 28). Amount of material called for in pattern. 4 buttons. 1 1/2 yards cotton tape. Introductory Statement Pajamas ...
-Boy's Shirt
Materials Madras (Chap. I, Par. 25), or Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31). Amount of material called for in pattern. Commercial pattern. 9 pearl buttons. Thread No. 70. Introductory Statement While ...
-Embroidered Luncheon Set
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40). l 3/4 yards plain woven linen, 36 wide. Embroidery cotton (delf blue, brown, pink, green). Embroidery needle. Thread No. 80. Introductory Statement Most h...
-Embroidered Luncheon Set. Continued
6. What kind of material is suitable for undergarments? 7. What is a ruffle? Name some garments on which the ruffle is frequently used. Explain. 8. Of what material should pajamas be made for very c...
-Introduction To Section VI
THE work of this section is intended only for students who have completed the elementary processes set forth in the earlier parts of this book. The undergarments and others which may not be rendered w...
-Middy Blouse
Materials Indian Head (Chap. I, Par. 21), or Galatea (Chap. I, Par. 18). 2 1/2 to 3 yards of material above. 1/2 yard material for collar and cuffs. 4 yards braid. Tie. Thread No. 70. Introd...
-Tailored Waist
Materials Dimity (Chap. I, Par. 15) or Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23) or Madras (Chap. I, Par. 25) or Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31). 2 1/2 yards of 36 material. 4 buttons. Thread to correspond with mater...
-Tailored Skirt
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40) or Galatea (Chap. I, Par. 18) or Indian Head (Chap. I, Par. 21). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern, or if drafted pattern is used, plan from ...
-House Dress
Materials Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19) or Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31). Amount of material called for in pattern, if commercial pattern is used. If drafted pattern is used, figure from the pattern the...
-School Dress
Materials Linen (Chap. I, Par. 40) or Percale (Chap. I, Par. 31) or Gingham (Chap. I, Par. 19). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern. Thread No. 70. Fastenings necessary, accordin...
-Wool Dress
Materials Serge (Chap. I, Par. 62) or Panama (Chap. I, Par. 61). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern. Trimmings appropriate for design selected. Belting, 2 longer than waist mea...
-Silk Dress
Materials Foulard (Chap. I, Par. 74), or Taffeta (Chap. I, Par. 78). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern. Belting 2 longer than waist measure. Silk thread to match material. Tr...
-Lingerie Dress
Materials Organdie (Chap. I, Par. 29) or Lawn (Chap. I, Par. 23) or Handkerchief Linen (Chap. I, Par. 46). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern. Suitable trimming for style selec...
-Gymnasium Suit
Materials Serge (Chap. I, Par. 62) or Flannel (Chap. 1, Par. 59) or Sateen (Chap. I, Par. 32). Amount of material called for in commercial pattern. Thread to match material. Fastenings. Intro...
-Coat
Materials Wool (Chap. I, Par. 50). Amount of novelty coat cloth called for in the commercial pattern. Binding ribbon. Silk thread to match material. Buttons (large). Introductory Statement In...
-Coat. Continued
1. Do you consider the study of dress an important subject? Why? 2. What is meant by a garment being in style? How much attention do you think should be given to style when planning your clothes? 3....
-Supplement. Chapter I. Textiles
To get a perfectly clear understanding of the various textiles it would be necessary to study the history of race development, in order to become acquainted with the different kinds of materials which...
-The Vegetable Fibers. Cotton
Paragraph 1. Very important. textile fibers come from the vegetable kingdom; while there are several that contribute slightly, cotton and flax are the only ones worthy of consideration from a practica...
-Batiste
Paragraph 2. Batiste is a very light cotton fabric, woven of fine threads. It varies considerably in quality. There are some coarser forms that are used for linings while the finer forms are found in ...
-Buckram
Paragraph 3. Buckram is a very cheap cotton fabric not used much in the manufacture of clothing except for interlinings where some stiffness is required. It is very coarsely woven, usually in plain co...
-Burlap
Paragraph 4. Burlap is a very coarse cloth made of hemp or jute, though some of the finer varieties are made of cotton. The coarser kinds are used for wrappings, under portions of upholstery, or where...
-Calico
Paragraph 5. Calico is the most common of all the cotton fabrics. It was originally made in Calcutta, India, from which the name calico is derived. It is first woven plain, after which a color or prin...
-Cambric
Paragraph 6. The name cambric was originally applied only to a very fine linen cloth. A fabric by this name is now made of cotton, however, though not so good in quality as that made of linen. It is a...
-Canton Flannel
Paragraph 7. Canton flannel originated in Canton, China. It is a very common cotton fabric and may be easily recognized by the twilled surface on one side and the long smooth nap on the opposite side....
-Canvas
Paragraph 8. Canvas is a strong coarsely woven cloth very similar to duck. It is used for tents, awnings and various coverings which must be exposed to weather. Art canvas is a name applied to many op...
-Chambray
Paragraph 9. Chambray is a very common cotton fabric, strong and serviceable and used for house dresses and other inexpensive purposes. It is generally found in plain colors with white selvages. This...
-Cheese Cloth
Paragraph 10. Cheese Cloth is a very cheap cotton fabric, deriving its name from the purpose for which it was first used, to wrap cheese. It is not a very strong material, plain weave, very sheer. It ...
-Corduroy
Paragraph 11. Corduroy is a very strong cotton material recognized by its half-round ridges running lengthwise of the cloth. These ridges or ribs resemble velvet very much, due to the soft cotton pile...
-Cretonne
Paragraph 12. Cretonne is a strong cotton cloth, rather well known for its large designs and attractive colors. The design is printed after the cloth is woven, hence the design is found only on one si...
-Damask
Paragraph 13. The original damask was a fine linen fabric, deriving its name from Damascus. A very good imitation is now made of cotton. It is woven smooth like sateen with a distinct twill in a conve...
-Denim
Paragraph 14. Denim is a coarse, strong cotton fabric, generally woven in plain colors, presenting a fine, uneven, twilled weave. It is most commonly used for floor coverings, upholstering purposes or...
-Dimity
Paragraph 15. Dimity is a sheer cotton fabric, woven so as to present the appearance of cords or ribs. It is made in white or colors, sometimes printed with figures. It is a very light weight material...
-Duck
Paragraph 16. Duck is a very familiar cotton fabric. It is a strong, heavy material used for tents, awnings and ship sails. Some of the lighter weaves are used for wearing apparel. It may be had eithe...
-Flannelette
Paragraph 17. Flannelette is a very soft cotton material woven so as to present a slight nap on both sides. It may be had either plain or printed in colors. It is used in making garments that require ...
-Galatea
Paragraph 18. Galatea is a very heavy cotton fabric which may be had either in plain colors, figures or stripes. It is very strong and serviceable and is particularly suitable for children's clothing....
-Gingham
Paragraph 19. Gingham is probably the most common and serviceable of the cotton fabrics. It may be had in plain weave or in almost any combination of warp and woof threads. The fact that the design is...
-Huckaback
Paragraph 20. Huckaback is a material generally used for towels. It may be had either woven entirely of cotton or of linen. It is also sometimes made in combination of cotton and linen. It is so woven...
-Indian Head
Paragraph 21. Indian Head is a cotton fabric, very much resembling duck, although of much finer weave. It is used for very much the same purposes. Most common width, 36. Usual price per yard, 15c. ...
-Khaki
Paragraph 22. Khaki is a heavy plain woven material, very similar to duck, usually brown or dust color. It is used for men's rough garments and outing suits. Most common width, 27. Usual price per ya...
-Lawn
Paragraph 23. Lawn is a very fine, sheer cotton fabric which may be either plain white or colored. It is very commonly seen with dainty flower designs of delicate colors. It presents a very soft, smoo...
-Long Cloth
Paragraph 24. Long Cloth is a fine cotton fabric made in a great many different qualities. It is very soft, coarsely woven and is used a great deal in making underwear and infants' clothing. It closel...
-Madras
Paragraph 25. Madras is a very common cotton fabric. It may be found either in white, striped, figured or plain colors. It is often used for dresses and shirts. It probably originated in Madras, India...
-Mull
Paragraph 26. Mull is a very fine quality of soft muslin which is used in dresses. It may be had in plain white or colors. It was originally a combination of cotton and silk. Most common width, 32. U...
-Muslin
Paragraph 27. Muslin is one of the most common of the cotton fabrics. It is made in a great many different qualities, both bleached and unbleached. It is used for pillow cases, sheeting, linings and u...
-Nainsook
Paragraph 28. Nainsook is a light cotton fabric which is very soft. It does not have as much body as the finer lawn or batiste, but is made in various grades. It is frequently used for infants' clothi...
-Organdie
Paragraph 29. Organdie is a very fine, almost transparent, muslin of plain weave. It is sometimes stamped with figures or designs. It is used for dresses. Most common width, 18 to 60. Usual price pe...
-Outing Flannel
Paragraph 30. Outing Flannel is a very common cotton fabric, very similar in appearance to flannel, having the nap on each side. It may be had in plain colors or stripes or checks. It is used in makin...
-Percale
Paragraph 31. The original percale was probably made of linen, although a great deal of percale is now made of a good grade of cotton. It is closely woven, with the figure woven into the material, som...
-Sateen
Paragraph 32. Sateen is a cotton imitation of satin. On one side it presents a twilled appearance, on the other side it has a lustrous appearance very much like satin. It is used principally for linin...
-Silkaline
Paragraph 33. Silkaline is a soft cotton fabric which bears a slight resemblance to silk, due to its peculiar glazed finish. It is usually found in attractive colors which are printed after the materi...
-Ticking
Paragraph 34. Ticking is a very strong cloth of excellent wearing qualities. As the name suggests, its principal use is for mattresses, pillows or various other ticking purposes. Most common width, 27...
-Turkish Toweling
Paragraph 35. Turkish Toweling is a coarsely woven cloth in which, by a special method of weaving, the woof threads are continuously thrown up on the right and wrong sides in short loops. It is used f...
-Velour
Paragraph 36. Velour is woven in several widths, presenting a smooth surface, due to the pile, somewhat similar to velvet. The lighter weights are used for dress trimming while the heavier weights are...
-Linen
Paragraph 40. Next to cotton, the most important vegetable fiber comes from the flax plant. This fiber is not a seed hair like cotton, but is a bast fiber; this is the tough thread-like substance foun...
-Batiste Linen
Paragraph 41. Batiste is a fine, soft linen fabric. It is very sheer, somewhat similar to, but much finer than cotton batiste. It is used for waist and dress material. Most common width, 36. Usual pr...
-Butcher's Linen
Paragraph 42. Butcher's Linen is a very heavy, closely woven material, somewhat resembling canvas though finer and stronger. It is used for aprons, dress skirts and for butchers' aprons from which the...
-Cambric Linen
Paragraph 43. Cambric is a very fine, thin linen material, similar to, but much finer than cotton cambric. It is used for dress goods and handkerchiefs. Most common width, 36. Usual price per yard, 5...
-Crash
Paragraph 44. There are a great many different qualities of crash. Some are made entirely of linen, others of cotton and some of mixed materials. Crash is made principally for towels, though some-time...
-Damask Linen
Paragraph 45. Damask is one of the best known of linen fabrics. It is a very fine material used for table cloths, napkins and fine towels. It is usually woven in figures and designs. Most common width...
-Handkerchief Linen
Paragraph 46. Handkerchief Linen is a plain, fine, smoothly woven fabric designed for handkerchiefs. It is sometimes used for dress material. Most common width 30. Usual price per yard, 50c to $2.00....
-Huckaback Linen
Paragraph 47. Huckaback is a loosely woven linen fabric, being so woven as to expose much of the surface of the woof threads. It is so designed in order to give it a greater absorbing surface. It is s...
-Animal Fibers. Wool
Paragraph 50. Of the animal fibers, wool is by far the most plentiful and the most important. Wool is the hair of a certain class of animals, of which the sheep is most common. There are a great many ...
-Alpaca
Paragraph 51. Alpaca is a fine woolen fabric, which somewhat resembles silk; it is very beautiful on account of its glossy appearance. It combines well with cotton and is often so found. It is used ex...
-Blankets
Paragraph 52. Blankets are a very common woolen fabric, known for their soft covered surface. They are usually purchased in full size ready for use. They are woven without any seams and may be had in ...
-Broad Cloth
Paragraph 53. One of the finest of our woolen fabrics, and probably one longest known as a standard for fine suits is broad cloth. It has a very soft smooth finished surface. It is so closely woven th...
-Bunting
Paragraph 54. Bunting is a very coarsely woven woolen fabric. It is used in making the better grade of flags. It may be had in colors. Most common width, 24. Usual price per yard, 35c to 50c. ...
-Cashmere
Paragraph 55. Cashmere has a distinct twilled weave that is very soft. It derives its name from the cashmere goat. It is used principally for dress goods. Most common width, 36 to 45. Usual price pe...
-Cheviot
Paragraph 56. Cheviot is a strictly woolen cloth made both with a rough surface and a smoother finish. It is very much like serge but somewhat heavier. It is woven both plain and twilled. It is used p...
-Eiderdown
Paragraph 57. Eiderdown is a heavy woolen fabric, though it presents a very soft surface on account of its long pile. It is used principally for wraps. Most common width 27 to 44. Usual price per ya...
-Felt
Paragraph 58. Felt is a very peculiar woolen fabric which is made without being woven at all, but simply by pressing the wool fibers so as to form a cloth; no other textile fiber has this property of ...
-Flannel
Paragraph 59. Flannel is a soft finished loosely woven material which may be had in plain or various colors, slightly napped. It is used for dress goods, shirts, petticoats and infants' wearing appare...
-Henrietta
Paragraph 60. Henrietta is a soft woolen fabric very much like cashmere. The original henrietta cloth was made partly of silk and partly of wool. It has a distinct twilled weave. It is used in making ...
-Panama
Paragraph 61. Panama is a soft fabric made with a distinct weave in plain colors. It is very serviceable, being used principally for dresses, suits and skirts. Most common width, 42 to 54. Usual pri...
-Serge
Paragraph 62. There are many different kinds of serge which are named according to their finishes. Some serges contain considerable silk; they usually present a smooth, firm surface due to the hard fi...
-Voile
Paragraph 63. Voile is one of the thinnest of the woolen fabrics, coarsely woven, even showing space between the warp and woof threads. It is used for fine dresses. Most common width 42 to 45. Usual...
-Silks
Paragraph 70. Silk is the most valuable and the most wonderful of all the textile fibers. It was first used by the Chinese, probably as early as 1700 B. C. The origin of silk was kept a secret among t...
-Chiffon
Paragraph 71. Chiffon is a very thin gauze-like fabric, usually found in plain colors. It is used extensively for trimmings in millinery, also for veils and dress goods. Most common width, 46. Usual ...
-China Silk
Paragraph 72. China Silk, as the name suggests, is made in China. It is a plain woven material, but has irregular threads and is distinguished by its softness. It is a very durable material and is the...
-Crepe De Chine
Paragraph 73. This is a very beautiful silk material, having a smoother surface than most of the crepes; it is very soft and lustrous. Although it is a plain weave, it is frequently changeable, due to...
-Foulard
Paragraph 74. The Foulard is a French silk, originally used for handkerchiefs, now used for dress goods; it is made both in the plain and woven designs. Most common width, 24. Usual price per yard, 6...
-Plush
Paragraph 75. Plush is a very common heavy silk fabric, used principally for trimmings or for heavy coats; it is also used somewhat in upholstering. It is very similar to velvet, but has longer and mo...
-Pongee
Paragraph 76. Pongee is a common silk fabric, used for coats and dress goods. It also originated in China where it was hand woven. Originally it was probably made from the silk of wild silk worms. It ...
-Satin
Paragraph 77. Satin is a very common but expensive form of silk. It is used, not only for clothing, but in many forms for fancy decorations. Some of the better qualities are employed in the constructi...
-Taffeta
Paragraph 78. Taffeta is a very thin glossy silk, usually of plain texture and plain colors, although it is sometimes made with woven figures. It is used for gowns and linings. It is not so strong and...
-Velvet
Paragraph 79. Velvet is perhaps the finest of the silk fabrics. It is so woven as to present a rather long pile which is so cut as to form a continuous smooth surface. It is used for trimmings and als...
-Chapter II. Sewing Processes. Introductory Suggestions
Paragraph 100. One of the first things to think of when beginning to sew is the position in which you should sit. Sit erect, in an easy position with the work near enough the eyes so that it can be e...
-Straightening Cloth
Paragraph 101. While cloth is always woven so that the threads run perpendicular to each other, that is, the woof threads( those that run from selvage to selvage) cross the warp threads (those that ru...
-Straightening The Edge Of Cloth
Paragraph 102. The edge of a piece of cloth which has been cut unevenly may be straightened as follows: Pull out a thread entirely across the uneven edge, starting to draw it at the point where the d...
-Even Basting
Paragraph 103. Insert the needle on the right side of the cloth. This will leave the knot on the right side, where it should be, for the basting is only a temporary stitch and will be removed when the...
-Uneven Basting
Paragraph 104. The uneven basting stitch is made the same as the even basting stitch (Par. 103) except that the stitch on the upper side of the cloth is made about two or three times as long as the st...
-Tacking
Paragraph 105. Tacking is a modification of the uneven basting stitch (Par. 104), except that the short stitches are usually made slanting or vertical. Tacking is used to fasten linings and inter-lini...
-The Running Stitch
Paragraph 106. The running stitch consists of very short even stitches, always the same length on the right and wrong sides of the material. To make this stitch, tie a knot in the thread, bring the ne...
-The Backstitch
Paragraph 107. The backstitch, as the name implies, is made by setting the needle back on the right side of the material halr the length of the stitch just made on the underside, thus making a continu...
-Overhanding
Paragraph 109. Overhanding consists of very small stitches whipped over and over edges of material, not for the mere function of preventing raveling, as is the case with overcasting, but to bind the t...
-Overhanding A Seam
Paragraph 110. A seam may be made by overhanding together two selvage edges or two raw edges turned under. To avoid using a knot which would be difficult to conceal, you may fasten the thread by sewin...
-Overhanding A Hem
Paragraph 111. The overhanded hem is made by sewing the folded edges of a hem to the body of the material with the overhand-ing stitch instead of the hemming stitch. To do this fold down the desired ...
-Overhanding On Lace
Paragraph 112. In sewing lace to the edge of material, it is overhanded or whipped on to make it lie flat on the edge of the material. To sew on the lace, lay the edge parallel with the edge of the m...
-Overcasting
Paragraph 113. Overcasting is a loose slanting stitch used to prevent raveling of edges. To make this stitch, trim off the material which is to be over-casted. This stitch is usually worked from left ...
-Hemming
Paragraph 114. A hem is formed by folding over an edge of material, usually with the raw edge slightly turned under, and sewing it down securely to form a neat, strong edge. After the hem is folded an...
-Hemstitching
Paragraph 115. Hemstitching is an artistic method of making a hem by drawing a certain number of threads from the body of the material, and catching the remaining threads regularly in the hemming proe...
-Double Hemstitching
Paragraph 116. Double hemstitching is very similar to the single hemstitching except that it repeats the process on the opposite side of the tiny space from which the threads are drawn. Figure 14. ...
-Damask Hemstitching
Paragraph 117. The damask hemstitch is a modification of the ordinary hemstitch, the threads being wrapped to produce an artistic effect. To make this stitch, first plan the hem, draw the desired num...
-Rolled Hem
Paragraph 118. The rolled hem is a very small round hem. As the name suggests, it is rolled rather than folded on the edge of the material. To make a rolled hem, hold the edge of the material between ...
-French Hem
Paragraph 119. The French hem is the same as the overhanded hem discussed in Paragraph 111. ...
-Catch Stitching Or Herringbone
Paragraph 120. Catch stitching consists of short, even stitches alternately taken in two parallel lines. (This can best be seen by examining the underside of the material after a few stitches are comp...
-Single Featherstitching
Paragraph 121. Single featherstitching consists of a series of even slanting (or bias) stitches so taken alternately on right and left sides of a central line as to form an ornamental row or border. ...
-Double Featherstitch
Paragraph 122. The double featherstitch is started in the same manner as the single featherstitch (Paragraph 121) except that instead of crossing to the opposite side of the central line after complet...
-Treble Featherstitching
Paragraph 123. Treble featherstitching, as the name suggests, consists of three stitches arranged in featherstitching. It is started in the same manner as the single featherstitching (Paragraph 121) a...
-Cross-Stitch
Paragraph 124. The cross-stitch, as the name indicates, is so made that the threads lie in the form of a cross; it may be slightly modified to suit the particular style of design on which it is applie...
-Outline Etching Stitch
Paragraph 125. The outline etching stitch is worked on a line; it has the appearance of running stitches with their ends slightly overlapping somewhat like backstitching. To make the stitch, tie a kn...
-The Chain Stitch
Paragraph 126. The chain stitch is rather simple consisting of continuous loops which give the finished line of stitches the appearance of a chain. To make this stitch, tie a knot in the thread, bring...
-Seed Stitch
Paragraph 127. The seed stitch is a very simple ornamental stitch consisting of small backstitches (Par. 107). To make the stitch, the knot is tied and left on the under side, or two or three stitches...
-Blanket Stitch, Loop Stitch Or Single Buttonhole. Stitch
Paragraph 128. The blanket stitch consists of even parallel stitches on the edge of material so looped as to cause a continuous line of thread to lie along the extreme edge of the goods. To do this, f...
-The Couching Stitch
Paragraph 129. The couching stitch is made by sewing a heavy cord neatly in place on the lines of a design; the design should be drawn on the material before the couching work is begun. The cord usual...
-Making French Knots
Paragraph 130. The French knots consist of artistic knots or bunches of thread arranged on the surface of material for decorative purposes. To make the French knot, tie a knot in the thread and bring...
-The Satin Stitch
Paragraph 131. The satin stitch consists of over and over stitches taken very close together so the threads will lie one against the other. When the satin stitch is to be made with fine thread the des...
-Lazy Daisy Stitch
Paragraph 132. The lazy daisy stitch is simply a loop of thread fastened with a running stitch at the top. It is worked over a design. To make this stitch fasten the thread by taking two or three tin...
-Sewing On Hooks
Paragraph 133. In sewing on hooks and eyes, the hooks are usually sewed on first. Place the hook in the position desired, setting it back from the edge of the hem at least 1/8. Knot the thread and in...
-Forming A Loop
Paragraph 134. A loop to serve the same purpose as a steel eye may be formed of thread. It should be made in the exact place where you would sew on a steel eye to receive the hook. Tie a knot in the t...
-Sewing On Buttons
Paragraph 135. Fasten the thread by taking two or three small stitches on the under side of the material or, if a knot is used, insert the needle about 1/2 away and running it between the thicknesses...
-Making Buttonholes
Paragraph 136. A buttonhole is a slit made in at least two thicknesses of material finished with the buttonhole stitch, to receive a button. The hems of thin material are sometimes interlined to give ...
-French Seam
Paragraph 137. A French seam is one very commonly used, in which the raw edges are sewed together and turned inside the final sewing. Baste together with a 3/8 seam using even basting (Par. 103), sew...
-The Felled Seam (Hemmed)
Paragraph 138. The felled seam is a very flat seam made by turning in and hemming, or stitching flat, one overlapping edge of a seam. It is made as follows: Baste and stitch the material with the mach...
-Lapped Seam
Paragraph 139. The lapped seam is a very strong smooth seam which lies perfectly flat. Its strength is due to the fact that it is sewed with two rows of stitching. It is made on the right side of the ...
-Gathering
Paragraph 141. Gathering is a very common process in sewing. It consists of running stitches drawn through the material tightly enough to produce a fullness which may be evenly divided when it is sewe...
-Setting Gathers On A Band
Paragraph 142. After care has been taken to give the gathers an even pleated effect, they should be sewed carefully to the band, or to whatever part of the garment they are to be attached. Before draw...
-Cutting Bias Strips
Paragraph 143. There are two kinds of bias strips, true bias and untrue bias. A true bias is cut at an exact angle of 45 degrees by folding the warp threads of the material over on the woof threads an...
-Squaring A Corner
Paragraph 145. Where the hems on the corners of adjoining edges cross, the neatness of the work may be improved by cutting away some of the extra thicknesses. This may be done by squaring the corners ...
-Mitering A Corner
Paragraph 146. Where two hems overlap at a corner, it is often desirable to remove some of the extra thicknesses of material. Figure 52. This may be done by mitering the corner. To do this, lay th...
-Joining Lace
Paragraph 148. It is often necessary to splice a piece of lace. An ordinary seam would show plainly and mar the appearance of the work. Lace may be spliced so the joining will show but very little. To...
-Hemmed Or Set-On Patch
Paragraph 149. A hemmed, or set-on, patch consists of a piece of material (with the raw edges turned under on all sides) sewed over a hole in another piece of material. Before beginning to mend the ho...
-Overhand Or Set-In Patch
Paragraph 150. The over-hand, or set-in, patch consists of a piece of material (with its raw edges folded back on all sides) set into another piece of material. To make this patch, cut away all of th...
-The Woolen Patch
Paragraph 151. The material with the hole in it, as shown in No. 1, Figure 60, is a part of a boy's pocket which had worn through because of the load of marbles carried in it. The patch used to mend i...
-Mending Woolen Goods With Tissue
Paragraph 152. When a woolen garment is torn and the edges are not badly frayed, and none of the material is out and gone, it may be mended very satisfactorily with mending tissue, a rubber-like mater...
-Darning Woolen Goods
Paragraph 153. Oftentimes a tear in a garment can be darned more satisfactorily than it can be patched. No. 1, Figure 62, shows a three-cornered and a diagonal tear in a piece of woolen goods. No. 2, ...
-Darning A Stocking
Paragraph 154. Stockings should be repaired as soon as a small hole appears in them, as a small hole is easily darned but a large one presents a difficult task. Ordinary darning cotton is used to darn...
-Slip Stitch Crochet
Paragraph 156. The slip stitch, which interlocks other crochet stitches, is made by passing a hook through a completed loop and drawing the yarn through that loop before drawing it through the loop on...
-Double Crochet
Paragraph 157. This stitch consists of a loop of yarn or thread drawn through a chain stitch forming two loops on the hook through which another loop is drawn. To do this, make the chain as long as de...
-Treble Crochet
Paragraph 158. In treble crochet, there are three loops on the hook at one time instead of two loops, as in double crochet. These loops are drawn off the hook in groups of two. To make the treble croc...
-Plackets
Paragraph 159. A placket is an opening left in a garment for convenience in putting it on, the raw edges being finished to keep it from tearing or raveling. Plackets are made in skirts, in the bottom ...
-Faced Placket
Paragraph 163. The faced placket (Par. 159) is a combination of the hemmed and extension plackets, the upper, or right edge of the opening being turned under in a hem, or faced back with silk or perca...
-Sewing On Machine
Paragraph 164. As the sewing machine is a great time saver, every girl should know how to use it. Before trying to sew on the machine you should study the general directions that are given in the book...
-Chapter III. Care, Repairing, Cleaning And Pressing Of Clothing
There probably never was a time in the history of civilization when so much attention was given to the matters of dress as in the present day. To be sure there have been periods in which the wealthy a...
-Clothing And Personality
It is not unusual to hear the remark that Miss Blank always looks well dressed in whatever she puts on. If this is carefully analyzed you will find that Miss Blank's attractive appearance is many time...
-Economy In Dress
On every hand, we hear expressions relative to the high cost of living and the unusual expense of the things required in daily life. While this is true, yet there are many ways in which economy may be...
-Care Of Clothing
Ones bedroom should be provided with a good roomy wardrobe. Sometimes such wardrobes can not be had. This, however, is no excuse for neglecting to care for ones clothing. The dresser should serve the ...
-Care Of Clothing Between Seasons
The care of the clothing between seasons is an important matter. Before clothing is laid away it should be very carefully brushed to remove all dust. Spots and stains (if there are any) should be remo...
-Altering Garments
It is frequently good economy to remodel a garment which has been left over from the previous season. This is especially true if the material in the garment is of a fine quality. Matters of readjustin...
-Dyeing Garments
The matter of dyeing or coloring garments was given a great deal of attention by our grandmothers, but most of this class of work is now done by professionals. It is impossible to give specific direct...
-Cleaning Garments
The subject of cleaning garments is a very broad one covering every line of work from that of the simple principles employed by the washerwoman to the most technical work done by the professional clea...
-Laundering Cotton Or Linen
The matter of laundry may seem perfectly simple when you see the great basket of clothing going to the weekly wash, however, if you will ask a few questions you will probably find that certain garment...
-Laundering Colored Garments
Colored garments should not be laundered in the same water with the white clothes; they must be carefully treated to avoid fading or otherwise changing the colors. The treatment of delicate colors is ...
-Laundering Wool
Wool is much more sensitive than cotton and for that reason wool garments can not undergo the same process of laundering through which the cotton materials are taken. On account of its peculiar scaly ...
-Removing Spots And Stains
The matter of removing spots, stains and various discolorations from garments is an extremely difficult one. In order to advise as to how a spot may be removed, it is necessary to know what caused the...
-A Few Of The Most Common Stains And Their Treatment, Alphabetically Arranged
1. Blood Stains. Blood stains can usually be removed by wetting with cold water, afterwards washing with luke warm water and soap. The addition of a little ammonia will assist. Hydrogen Peroxide to wh...
-Pressing Clothes
Everyone is more or less familiar with the simple processes of ironing clothes for the purpose of making the surface smooth and attractive. While there is much that can be said regarding the treatment...
-Clothes Pressing Equipment
Home Pressing Outfit. No special equipment is required to do home pressing. The work may be done on an ordinary ironing board, although a table will usually be found more convenient. If a table is ...
-To Press A Pair Of Trousers
Trousers are not difficult to press. They should first be carefully cleaned as already explained. One leg should be pressed at a time, the other being folded back out of the way. It is usually found m...
-Pressing A Vest
A vest is a very easy garment to press. It should be pressed on a pressing board in the manner shown in the illustration. If you do not have such a pressing board, it may be pressed on the corner of t...
-Pressing A Coat
A coat is much more difficult to press because of its irregular shape and heavy padding. A beginner should not undertake to press a coat, but should practice on some of the easier garments such as tro...
-To Press A Wool Dress
The dress should be thoroughly dusted and all spots removed before pressing. To press a plain skirt, lay it over the ironing board, with the bottom of the skirt on the wide end of the board; stretch i...
-To Press A Silk Garment
Silk is very susceptible to heat; therefore, in pressing silk garments care should always be taken to see that the iron is warm, rather than hot. Turn the garment wrong side out, and if necessary damp...
-Chapter IV. Patterns And Pattern Drafting
General Discussion JUST how much should be undertaken in the matter of pattern drafting in public school work has been a question of considerable discussion. There is no doubt that the technical cons...
-Taking Measurements For A Foundation Shirt Waist Pattern
The success of your pattern drafting will depend very greatly on the accuracy of your measurements. The measurements may be taken over a thin waist, preferably with set-in sleeves. It is difficult to ...
-Drafting A Foundation Shirt Waist Pattern The Front
NOTE: You should make a careful study of the illustration given here, locating each point and thinking through every operation connected with making the pattern. Most students who have difficulty in d...
-One-Piece Foundation Sleeve
Measurements. Length of Arm from Shoulder to Wrist. Measure from end of shoulder to the wrist. Armhole. Measurement around the arm where it joins the shoulder (an easy measure), about the size of the...
-Developing Other Patterns From The Shirt Waist Pattern. Corset Cover
A corset cover pattern may be developed from the shirt waist pattern in the following manner: For the front, measure up from the end of the shoulder line of the waist pattern one-third the length of t...
-Chemise
For the front of the chemise, measure up from the end of the shoulder of the shirt waist pattern one-third the length of the shoulder; measure down from the base of the neck of the waist pattern to th...
-Nightgown
A nightgown pattern may be developed from the shirt waist pattern in the same manner as suggested for the chemise, except that the nightgown is made long enough to touch the floor. When the length is ...
-Suggestions For Fitting Waist
Put on the waist right side out and pin it together. Place a tape measure, or piece of cotton tape over the garment at the waist line and adjust the fullness at the bottom of the waist. If the shoulde...
-Sleeve
Place the sleeve in the armhole of the waist with the under-arm seam about 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 from the under-arm seam of the waist. See that the seam of the sleeve hangs straight to the front of the wri...
-Foundation Skirt
Measurements. Waist Measure. A close measurement around the smallest part of the waist. Before taking the other measurements, pin a tape measure or narrow strip of muslin around the waist; let the bot...
-Kimono Nightgown
Measurements Neck Measure at Shoulder. Measurement from bone in center back of neck out on the shoulder far enough to make the neck of the gown as low as desired at this point. Neck Measure at Cente...
-Drawers #2
Measurements Waist Measure. Measurement around the smallest part of the waist. Hip Measure. Loose measurement around the fullest part of the hips about 6 from the waist line. Length of Side. Measu...









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