The next work of this grade is the making of a dress for a child from three to five years of age, or for the big doll, if there is one belonging to the department. The measures for the waist of this little gown are taken as for the underwaist, and the pattern is drafted and cut in the same way.

For the sleeve, the following measures are taken: The length of the arm over the elbow from the shoulder to the wrist; the length from the elbow to the wrist; the length of the inside arm; the length of the inside forearm from the elbow to the wrist; for the width take the size of the arm above the elbow, and add four inches. When these measures have been taken and tabulated, draw a dotted help line parallelogram, using the outside arm length and half the width for the two sides. Measure the length from the wrist to the elbow on line D, and put a point 1. Measure three inches on line A to the left from line D. Draw a curved line from this point 2 to the angle of lines C and D, which gives the outside curve of the sleeve.

For the wrist slant, measure one inch up on line B from the angle of lines B and A, and one inch to the left, point 3, and draw an oblique cutting line from point 2. From point 3, measure the length of the inner arm along line B, point 5. Measure from point 3 along line B the length of the inside forearm, and one inch to the right, point 4. Connect points 3, 4, and 5 with a curved cutting line.

From the angle of lines C and D, measure two inches on line C, point 6, and one inch from this, point 7. Draw a curving line from the angle of lines C and D to point 5 including point 7.

Sleeve Lining.

Sleeve Lining.

From point 1 on line D measure two inches to the left, and from point 2 at the wrist one inch to the left; connect the two by a curving line with point 6. From point 6 to point 5 draw a concave line, and the draft of the sleeve is complete. The under part which is drafted within the upper part can be outlined with a tracer and then cut. This is, of course, only a plain sleeve lining, but with this as a basis any sort of sleeve desired may be cut.

The skirt of this small frock may be made any length desired, allowing sufficient extra length for a five-inch hem. Three widths of goods twenty-seven inches wide are required for the little skirt. This skirt is made with a five-inch placket like the underskirt, but is unlike it in that it is seamed up without being turned to make a French fell.

The waist is made like the underwaist, but the seams are overcast instead of felled. The sleeve is basted in so that the under-arm seam is an inch and one-half to the front of the side seam of the waist, and it is then sewed in with a backstitch. The skirt should be divided into four parts, putting two inches more into each of the two back divisions than into the front, and when it is gathered, and the gathers stroked, join it to the waist in the same way as the underskirt, finishing the seam with a narrow instead of a wide facing. A little ruffle of the material, or of embroidery, or lace, makes a suitable finish for the neck and sleeves.

Questions And Answers

What is the first thing to be done in making a child's dress? Ans. To take the measures and draft the waist.

How is this done? Ans. The same as with the underwaist.

How many measures are taken for the sleeve? Ans. Five.

What are they? Ans. The length from the shoulder to the wrist over the elbow; the length from the shoulder to the elbow; the inside length of the arm; the inside forearm; and the width.

What is the first thing to be done in drafting a sleeve? Ans. Draw a dotted help line parallelogram with half the width for the short base line A, and the outside arm length for the long perpendicular lines B and D.

How is the outside cutting line of the sleeve found? Ans. Measure the length from the wrist to the elbow on line D, and put point 1 an inch to the left; measure four inches on line A to the left from line D, point 2, and draw a curved cutting line connecting it with point 1 and the angle of lines C and D.

How is the wrist slant obtained? Ans. One inch on line B from the angle of A and B and one inch to the left, fix point 3, and from it draw an oblique cutting line to point 2.

How is the under-arm seam found? Ans. From point 3 measure the length of the inner arm, point 5, and from point 3 the length of the forearm on line B and one inch to the right, point 4, and connect points 3, 4, and 5 with an incurving cutting line.

How is the curved upper part of the sleeve drafted? Ans. From the angles of lines C and D, measure two inches on line C, point 6, and one inch up from this, point 7, and connect the angle of lines C and D with points 7 and 5 by a curving line.

How is the under part of the sleeve drafted? Ans. From point 1 on line D measure two inches to the left, and from point 2 at the wrist one inch to the left, and connect with point 6 by a curved cutting line.

How is the under part of the sleeve cut? Ans. It is traced with a tracer, and then drawn and cut.

How is the waist put together? Ans. Like the underwaist except that the seams are not felled.

How is the skirt cut? Ans. Three lengths of ordinary width goods as long as is required, with five inches added for a hem.

How is the skirt divided? Ans. Into four parts, with two inches more in each of the two back divisions than in front.

How is it finished? Ans. It is gathered, and sewed to the waist like the underskirt, but it is finished on the wrong side with a narrow facing.

How is the sleeve put in? Ans. The under-arm seam of the sleeve is put an inch and a half toward the front from the side seam of the waist.