The little trousers which finish the work of this grade are intended to be buttoned onto an underwaist. The measures required are a waist measure, the length of the leg from the waist to the knee, and the inside of the leg to the knee.

A parallelogram with the outside leg measure for two sides, and half the waist measure for the other two, is drawn in dotted help lines. On lines B and D, measure the inside leg measure, and draw a help line E an inch and a half beyond these two lines.

On lines A and C to the left from line D, measure one inch more than half the length of these lines, and between these points draw a cutting line, F. Connect A and E on both sides by an oblique line. Measure an inch and a half down from line A on both sides, and draw a line with half an inch slant for a hem.

Measure up from the angle of lines D and C two and one-half inches, and connect line E with this point by an oblique line. From the angle of B and C, draw to E a line curved in slightly. One inch and a half from line E on the left side place point 1. Measure up the curved line of the front two and one-half inches, and place point 2. Cut a fly three inches long, curved on one side to fit the front seam between points 1 and 2, an inch and one-half wide in the center, and narrowed to a point on either side. Face the left front between points 1 and 2, and the seam on the right side of the fly between the same points, pressing the seam open, and stitching it down on either side.

Boy's Suit.

Boy's Suit.

Knee Trousers.

Knee Trousers.

Use two pieces of strong cloth for pockets, ten inches wide and seven inches long. Face these pieces with goods like the trousers on one of the seven-inch sides, so that they face each other. Measure down at the side five and a half inches from the top of each front, notch each side, and turn back and face. Fell on this side of the pocket, measuring seven inches which is not faced, bringing the top of the pocket to the top of the trousers. Care should be taken that the pocket be so basted that the faced part shall be on the inside. When the upper part of the pocket has been felled to the front of the trousers, baste so that the faced part is a little back from the edge, and sew with a backstitch.

Put a fly of material like the trousers, one and one-half inches wide, down five and one-half inches from the top on the sides of the backs. Sew the two fronts together and the two backs. Wet these seams with a sponge, and press until they are flat and perfectly dry. Work a stay at each edge of the front fly. Sew up the side seams as far as the pockets, and press in the same way. Baste so that the back and front seams come together, seam up, stitch, and press. Take a bias piece of black silesia three-quarters of an inch wide; stitch this onto the bottom of the legs, and when the hem has been turned, hem the silesia so that the stitches cannot be seen on the right side. Moisten and press these hems.

Turn in the top of the backs and the fronts, and fell on an inch and a half bias facing. Cut a double band an inch and a half wide. Put a buttonhole in the center of this band, and another half-way between the center and the sides of the trousers. Double in these bands, and stitch them onto the trousers at the top, with the edge of the band a little below the edge of the trousers. Fasten at the ends and between each buttonhole. Fasten the fly on the back of the trousers to the front, and work a stay where the two edges come together. Put a buttonhole on each side of the front of the trousers, and a button on the back so that the two edges come together.

To remove the shiny look caused by pressing, wet a cotton cloth, and, after wringing it quite dry, lay it over the shiny part, and go over it with a hot flatiron very lightly. Remove the cloth quickly, and brush. In doing this the iron should be kept in the hand, and not set down on the cloth.

Questions And Answers

What are the measures taken for boys' knee trousers? Ans. A waist measure, the length of the leg from the waist to the knee, and the inside of the leg to the knee.

What is the first thing to be done in drafting boys' trousers? Ans. Draw a dotted help line parallelogram with the outside leg measure for two sides, and half the waist measure for the other two.

What is the next step? Ans. On lines B and D mark off the inside leg measure, and draw a help line E an inch and a half beyond these two lines.

How is the line that divides the back from the front found? Ans. On lines A and 0 to the left from line D, measure one inch more than half the length of these lines, and connect by the cutting line F.

How is the lower part of the trousers leg formed? Ans. On both sides connect A and E by an oblique cutting line.

How is the hem provided for? Ans. Measure an inch and a half down from line A on both sides, and draw a line with half an inch slant for a hem.

How is the extra length in the back obtained? Ans. From the angle of lines D and C measure up two and one-half inches, and connect this point with line E by an oblique cutting line.

What is the next thing to be done? Ans. From the angle of B and C, draw a line to E curving in slightly.

Where is the opening for the front fly? Ans. One and one-half inches from line E is point 1, measure up the curved line two and one-half inches, point 2, - between these points is the space for the fly.

How is the fly cut and placed? Ans. It is three inches long, and curved to fit the front seam on one side, and is circular on the other.

Where is this placed? Ans. It is seamed on the right side, pressed and stitched, and the left side is faced between points 1 and 2.

How are the pockets cut? Ans. Ten inches wide and seven inches long.

How are the pockets prepared? Ans. They are faced on two sides with material like the trousers.

How are they put in? Ans. The sides which are not faced are felled to the fronts; they are then brought together and sewed, the tops being basted to the top of the trousers, and afterwards sewed on with a band.

How is the back part of the trousers opposite the pockets finished?. Ans. With a fly five and one-half inches long, and one and one-half inches wide.

What is the next thing to be done? Ans. Sew the two fronts together on either side of the fly, and after sewing the backs together and thoroughly pressing the seams, sew and press the side seams.

What is the last seam sewed? Ans. The inner leg seam, which should be sewed from the center with the two seams evenly opposite each other.

How should the seams be pressed? Ans. They should be wet with a sponge, and pressed until perfectly dry.

How is the front fly finished? Ans. A stay is worked at each side.

How are the sides finished? Ans. With a stay like the front fly where the seams begin.

How is the bottom of each leg finished? Ans. A bias strip of silesia three-fourths of an inch wide is stitched to the bottom, the hem is then turned, and the edge of the silesia turned and hemmed.

How is the top finished? Ans. Turn in the top of the back and front, and fell on a bias facing an inch and a half wide. Put a buttonhole a quarter of an inch from the edge, and a half-inch from the top in the front, and set buttons in the back so that the two edges come together.

How are the trousers buttoned onto the underwaist? Ans. Cut a band one inch shorter than the width of the fronts, and three inches wide, and another the same width one inch shorter than the width of the back. Double in the edges, and make one buttonhole in the center of each, and another in each side half-way between it and the edge of the trousers. Stitch this band on so that it does not show above the tops of the trousers, and fasten between each buttonhole.

How are the trousers finished? Ans. After the hems and the top have been thoroughly pressed, sponge by wetting a cloth, and, after wringing it quite dry, lay it on the seams on the right side, touch lightly with a heated flatiron, and brush quickly; in this way the shine caused by the pressing is removed.

Questions For Review

What is the first model of the seventh grade? How many patches are there in this model?

As a rule, how much larger is a patch than the opening to be mended? Is it necessary that the figure of the goods be matched? When the edges have been turned, how is the patch sewed into the opening?

What is the second work undertaken in this grade?

How many measures are taken for the sleeve?

When the measures have been taken, how is the sleeve pattern drafted?

How is the under part of the sleeve cut?

How is the skirt to the child's dress cut?

How is the sleeve basted into the waist?

How is the skirt divided before it is gathered?

How is the boy's blouse waist cut?

Is the boy's blouse closed in the front or back?

How full and how long is a boy's kilt skirt?

What are the measures taken for boys' trousers?

How is the pattern for boys' trousers drafted?

How is the fly for the front cut and placed?

How are the pockets cut?

How are the pockets put in?

How is the back part of the trousers opposite the pockets finished?

In what order are the seams of the trousers sewed?

How is the top of the trousers finished?

How are the bottoms finished?

How is pressing done?

After the trousers have been thoroughly pressed, how are they finished?

How is sponging done?