Unlike the four preceding stitches, the flannel stitch is worked from left to right. Although it will be necessary for the teacher to begin the first line, the pupil should now be sufficiently accustomed to counting threads to count off the six threads below the last line of hemming, and show the teacher the point where the first stitch should be taken. After counting off ten threads for the margin and six threads for the space between the last row of hemming and this new stitch, take up two threads from the right to the left. Leave two threads vertically down toward the lower part of the model, and two to the right, and take up two. This makes a diagonal connection between the two stitches slanting toward the right. Leave two threads vertically toward the top of the model and two to the right, and take up two. This again makes a diagonal connection between the two stitches also slanting toward the right. Continue this, and the result is a pretty, vine-like stitch which, although it may seem a trifle difficult at first, can be done, after very little practice, by children from six to eight years of age.

Questions And Answers

What is the fifth stitch on the model called? Ans. The flannel stitch.

Why has it been given this name? Ans. Because it is mostly used on flannels.

In what way is it different from stitches already done in this model? Ans. It is begun at the left-hand side instead of the right, and is worked from left to right.

How much space is left between the lines of the flannel stitch? Ans. Four threads of the canvas.