For the third model in this grade, which is for the knitted darning, cut a piece of cardboard three and one-half inches long and two and one-half inches wide. Draw straight lines one-half an inch from the top and bottom. This should be done by the pupil without assistance, with directions from the teacher. The lines at the top and bottom of the card should be divided into eighth-inch spaces. When this is done, take red cotton thread and stitch in each division, drawing the thread from the upper to the lower line, and so setting the needle that the thread is not straight, but slants from one division to the next.

When the warp threads have been placed, insert the needle into the first division from the wrong side; take up the first double thread, and put the needle back through the same division. Bring the needle up from the under side through the second division, take up the second double thread, and put the needle back through the second division. Continue this across the width of the model. Then put the needle through the first loop, but not through the cardboard, taking up one thread; then take up the two threads, put the needle back into the loop from which the thread comes, and take up with this loop the one next to it together with a single thread, drawing them down to form a loop. Continue in this way until the card is filled, being careful not to fasten the darning at any point to the cardboard. This darning is used in knitted fabrics, and, like other darning, is always done over a piece of cardboard.

Questions And Answers

What is the third model in this grade? Ans. The knitted darning. How is the model prepared? Ans. Cut a piece of cardboard three and one-half inches long and two and one-half inches wide; draw lines one-half an inch from the top and bottom, and divide the model into eighth-inch spaces.

How is the warp thread put in? Ans. With red cotton thread put a stitch in each division, first in the upper and then in the lower line, drawing the thread from one to the other, setting the needle in such a way that the thread is not straight, but slants from one division to the other.

How is the weft thread put in? Ans. Insert the needle in the first division from the wrong side, take up the first double thread, and put the needle back through the same division. Bring the needle up from the under side through the second division, take up the second double thread, and put the needle back through the second division. Continue this the width of the model.

How is the weft thread brought back? Ans. Put the needle through the first loop, but not through the cardboard, taking up one thread; then take up two threads, put the needle back into the loop from which the thread comes, and take up with this loop the one next to it with a single thread, and draw down into a loop.

Is this way of putting the weft thread back and forth continued until the model is finished? Ans. It is.

This darn is used for mending what sort of fabric? Ans. Knitted fabric.

How is a fabric of this kind prepared for mending? Ans. By basting a piece of cardboard under the place to be mended, and cutting the hole square.

In this case, is either the warp or the weft fastened to the cardboard? Ans. Neither.

Questions For Review

What is drafting?

What is a parallelogram?

What is the first thing to be done in drafting?

What is the gingham case when it is first drafted?

What is the second model of the third grade?

How many kinds of darning are there in this model?

What do the two threads in darning represent?

Are warp threads always straight?

What thread forms the pattern in darning and in weaving?

In what way is the linen darn different from the stocking darn?

How does the knitted darn differ from either of these?

How are these different kinds of darns used?

How is the fabric prepared that is to be mended with a darn?

Why should the place to be mended be cut square?

Why is cardboard basted under the fabric before the darning is done?