The majority of Gothic tapestries are anonymous as regards both maker and designer. It was a rare bit of good fortune - and brilliant investigative work on the part of M. Jules Guiffrey - that determined for us the names of Nicolas Bataille and Hennequin de Bruges as authors of the Angers Apocalypse. Seldom do we find woven signatures like that of Pierrot Féré in the Saint Piat and Saint Eleuthère set at Tournai (See chapter II (Gothic Tapestries)); or an inscription that gives the place of manufacture like that on the last of the set of fourteen, made for a church in Salins (Jura), picturing the life and miracles of Saint Anatoile. The inscription comes down to us in an inventory dated 1646, only two of the set being still preserved in the Salins Museum, and a third in the Museum of the Gobelins, the rest having been destroyed in 1793. The inscription reads: "These fourteen pieces of tapestry were at Burges [Bruges] made and constructed in the year of incarnation according to our usage 1501 - and were for Saint Anatoile, Bishop of Constantinople, son of the King of Scotland." The inscription in the bottom border of the Davillier Triumph of the Virgin at the Louvre (See plate no. 269), gives only the date Actu(M) A(O) 1485 (Made in the year 1485). Sometimes, by comparison with attributed paintings, we are able to identify the designer, as in the case of the "Saint Luke Painting the Virgin" tapestry at the Louvre, which is after Rogier Van Der Weyden's painting in Munich - but reversed, and with more decorative details - of which there is a duplicate in the Boston Fine Arts Museum. There also appears to be no doubt that the two Herkinbald tapestry scenes at Berne were woven from the paintings executed by Van Der Weyden for the Brussels City Hall, and destroyed by the bombardment in 1695.

With the Renaissance began the custom, in Brussels and other Flemish cities, of weaving the mark of the city into the bottom selvage, and the monogram of the weaver into the side selvage, on the right. This custom was confirmed by a Brussels ordinance of 1528, and by the edict of Charles V in 1544, that applied to the whole of the Netherlands.

The following are a few characteristic marks and monograms:

Willem Van Pannemaker, Brussels XVI century.

Willem Van Pannemaker, Brussels XVI century.

Willem Van Geubels, Brussels XVI century.

Willem Van Geubels, Brussels XVI century.

Brussels mark.

Brussels mark.

Plate no. 269. Triumph of the Virgin, a wonderfully beautiful Gothic triptych tapestry given to the Louvre by Baron Davillier.

Plate no. 269. Triumph of the Virgin, a wonderfully beautiful Gothic triptych tapestry given to the Louvre by Baron Davillier. In the middle panel, the Virgin with the infant Jesus. Upon her head two angels place a crown bearing the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove. Above all, the bust of God himself in attitude of benediction; crowned, and holding the imperial globe with cross in his left hand. On each side of the Creator four niches with busts of prophets, each with his appropriate Latin Scroll. The main scene on the left of the tapestry shows Moses striking water from the rock. On the right of the tapestry the Piscina Probatica (healing pool named from the sheep pond near Jerusalem) that is so delightfully illustrated in Reims Peintes.

Paris mark, first half XVII century.

Paris mark, first half XVII century.

Brussels mark.

Brussels mark.

Mark of Nancy in Lorraine.

Mark of Nancy in Lorraine.

Frans Van Geubels, Brussels XVI century

Frans Van Geubels, Brussels XVI century

Martin Reymbouts, Brussels late XVI century

Martin Reymbouts, Brussels late XVI century

Marc Crdtif, Brussels XVI century.

Marc Crdtif, Brussels XVI century.

Oudenarde mark.

Oudenarde mark.

Brussels mark.

Brussels mark.

Ian Raes, early XVII century

Ian Raes, early XVII century

Mark of Delft in Holland.

Mark of Delft in Holland.

Hans Van Der Biest, Munich XVII century.

Hans Van Der Biest, Munich XVII century.

Enghien mark.

Enghien mark.

Philip Van Der Cammen, late XVI century.

Philip Van Der Cammen, late XVI century.

Antoine Leyniers, Brussels late XVI century.

Antoine Leyniers, Brussels late XVI century.

Mortlake mark, with monogram of Philip de Maecht on the left, and of Sir Francis Crane on the right.

Mortlake mark, with monogram of Philip de Maecht on the left, and of Sir Francis Crane on the right.