An idea of the extent to which tapestry weaving - of a rustic but not uninteresting type - has been taken up by museums and arts-and-crafts associations in different parts of Europe, particularly in Norway and Sweden, can be got from the fact that for exhibits of picture tapestries at the Paris Exposition of 1900, gold or silver medals were awarded to:

The Akteselskalbet of Christiania, Norway, for tapestries woven by Madame Frida Hansen (See plate no. 231). The jury commented particularly on Madame Hansen's openwork portieres.

The Art Industry Museum of Trondhjem, Norway, for tapestries designed by M. Gerhard Munthe, and woven by Mile. Augusta Christiansen.

The Handarbetets Vanner (Friends of Handwork) of Stockholm, Sweden, with special mention of a large tapestry designed by the famous painter Carl Larssen.

The City of Pirot in Servia.

The Textile School of Scherrebeck in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

The Misses Brinkman of Hamburg, Germany.

The Society for the Encouragement of House Industry of Presburg, Hungary.

Madame Kovalski of Torental, Hungary.

The Finnish Society of Friends of the Manual Arts, of Helsingfors, Finland.

The Roumanian textile exhibit.

Plate no. 231. Modern Norwegian tapestry woven by Madame Frida Hansen, whose signature it bears and who was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exposition of 1900 (See chapter VII).

Plate no. 231. Modern Norwegian tapestry woven by Madame Frida Hansen, whose signature it bears and who was awarded a gold medal at the Paris Exposition of 1900 (See chapter VII (Other Looms. American, Italian, German, Spanish, Russian)). Design and technique are characteristic of the Scandinavian revival of tapestry, which is a revival not of French or Flemish tapestry weaving, but of the indigenous peasant weaving that uses softer wool and brighter colors and pays little or no attention to ribs and hatchings (See chapter VlII). For instance the tapestry illustrated has the warp threads vertical.