A simple and easily constructed telegraph key may be made in the following manner: Procure a piece of sheet brass, about 1/32 in. thick, and cut out a strip 3-1/2 in. long by 3/4 in. wide. Bend as shown in Fig. 1 and drill a hole for the knob in one end and a hole for a screw in the other. Procure a small wood knob and fasten it in place with a small screw. Cut a strip of the same brass 2-3/4 in. long and 5/16 in. wide and bend as shown in Fig. 2. Drill two holes in the feet for screws to fasten it to the base, and one hole in the top part for a machine screw, and solder a small nut on the under side of the metal over the hole.

Mount both pieces on a base 4-1/4 by 2-3/4 by 1/4 in., as in Fig. 3, and where the screw of the knob strikes the base when pressed down, put in a screw or brass-headed tack for a contact. Fasten the parts down with small brass wood-screws and solder the connections beneath the base. Binding posts from an old battery cell are used on the end of the base. The screw on top of the arch is used to adjust the key for a long or short stroke. --Contributed by S. V. Cooke, Hamilton, Canada. Homemade Telegraph Key Brass Key on a Wood Base

Illustration: Brass Key on a Wood Base

Homemade Telegraph Key #2

Homemade Telegraph Key Key and Connections

Key and Connections

A piece of wood, 1/2 in. thick, 2 in. wide and 5 in. long, is used for the base of this instrument. Two wire nails, each 1 in. long, are used for the cores of the magnets.

Each nail is wound with three or four layers of fine insulated magnet wire, about No. 25 gauge, similar to that used in electric bells, leaving about 1/4 in. of the end bare so that they may be driven into the wood base. The connections for the coils are shown in the sketch, at A.

About 1 in. behind the coils is fastened a small block of wood, the top of which is just even with the top of the nails in the coils. A piece of tin, cut in the shape of the letter T, is fastened with two screws to the top of this block, and the end bent slightly so as to clear the top of the nails about 1/32 in.

The key lever is cut from a thin piece of wood, in the shape shown in the sketch, and pivoted in a slotted block which is used as a base for the key. A piece of bare copper wire is fastened along the under side of the key, as shown by the dotted lines. A rubber band, passing over the end of the key and attached to the base with a tack, acts as a spring to keep the key open. A small piece of tin is fastened to the base under the knob of the key. This is for making the contact between the copper on the key and the wires from the coils, when the key is pushed down. --Contributed by W. H. Lynas.