While the wearing of copper rings for rheumatism may be a foolish notion, yet there is a certain galvanic action set up by the contact of the acid in the system of the afflicted person with the metal of the ring. Apart from this, however, a ring may be made from any metal, such as copper, brass and silver, if such metals are in plate or sheet form, by the following method:

Tools for Forming the Ring

Tools for Forming the Ring

All the tools necessary are a die and punch which are simple to make and will form a ring that will fit the average finger. Take a 3/4-in. nut, B, Fig. 1, and drill out the threads. This will leave a clear hole, 7/8 in. in diameter, or a hole drilled the desired size in a piece of iron plate will do as well. Countersink the top of the hole so that the full diameter of the countersink will be 1-1/4 in. This completes the die. The punch A, is made of a piece of 5/8 in. round iron, slightly rounded on the end so that it will not cut through the metal disk. The dimensions shown in Fig. 1 can be changed to suit the size of the finger to be fitted.

The metal used should be about 1/16 in. thick and 1-1/4 in. in diameter. Anneal it properly by heating and plunging in water. Lay it on the die so that it will fit nicely in the countersink and drive it through the hole by striking the punch with a hammer. Hold the punch as nearly central as possible when starting to drive the metal through the hole. The disk will come out pan shaped, C, and it is only necessary to remove the bottom of the pan to have a band which will leave a hole 5/8 in. in diameter and 1-1/4 in. wide. Place the band, D, Fig. 2, on a stick so that the edges can be filed and rounded to shape. Finish with fine emery cloth and polish. Brass rings can be plated when finished. --Contributed by H. W. Hankin, Troy, N. Y.