A very simple piece of art craft work is easily made, as follows: Secure a piece of paper and upon it draw the outline and design, as indicated in the accompanying sketch. The size may be made to suit the taste of the worker. A good size is 5 in. wide by 6 in. long over all. The metal holder should be proportioned to this size, as shown. Match Holder

Illustration: Match Holder

Having completed the drawing, take a piece of thin wood, 3/8 or 1/4 in. thick, and trace upon it the design and outline, using a piece of carbon paper. A couple of thumb tacks should be used to fasten the paper and design in place. Put the tacks in the lines of the design so that the holes will not show in the finished piece. Any kind of wood will do. Basswood or butternut, or even pine, will do as well as the more expensive woods.

Next prepare the metal holder. This may be made of brass or copper and need not be of very heavy gauge-No. 22 is plenty heavy enough. The easiest way to get the shape of the metal is to make a paper pattern of the development. The illustration shows how this will look and the size of the parts for the back dimensioned above. Trace this shape on the metal with the carbon paper and cut it out by means of metal shears. Polish the metal, using powdered pumice and lye, then with a nail, punch the holes, through which small round-head brass screws are to be placed to hold the metal to the wood back. Carefully bend the metal to shape by placing it on the edge of a board and putting another board on top and over the lower edge so as to keep the bending true.

The wood back may be treated in quite a variety of ways. If soft wood, such as basswood or pine was used, it may be treated by burning with the pyrography outfit. If no outfit is at hand a very satisfactory way is to take a knife and cut a very small V-shaped groove around the design and border so as to keep the colors from "running." Next stain the leaves of the conventional plant with a little green wood dye and with another dye stain the petals of the flower red. Malachite and mahogany are the colors to use. Rub a coat of weathered oil stain over the whole back and wipe dry with a cloth. The green and red are barbarously brilliant when first put on, but by covering at the same time the background is colored brown, they are "greyed" in a most pleasing manner. When it has dried over night, put a coat or two of wax and polish over the wood as the directions on the can suggest.

The metal holder may next be fastened in place.

If one has some insight in carving, the background might be lowered and the plant modeled, the whole being finished in linseed oil. If carving is contemplated, hard woods such as cherry or mahogany should be used.