A good springboard adds much to the fun of swimming. The boards are generally made so that the plank will bend, being dressed down thin at one end and fastened. The thinness of the plank, or an insecure fastening, causes many a plank to snap in two or come loose from its fastenings in a short time.

The accompanying sketch shows the method of constructing a springboard that does not depend upon the bending of the wood for its spring. It is made of a plank, 2 in. thick and from 14 to 16 ft. long, one end of which is secured with a hinge arrangement having a U-shaped rod whose ends are held with nuts. On each edge of the board, at the lower end, are fastened two pieces of strap iron, each about 1 ft. long and with the lower ends drilled to fit the horizontal of the U-shaped rod.

Secure a pair of light buggy springs from a discarded rig and attach to the ends of a square bar of iron having a length equal to the width of the plank. Fasten this to the plank with bolts, as shown in the sketch. Should the springs be too high they can be moved forward. --Contributed by John Blake, Franklin, Mass.

Buggy Springs Used beneath the Board

Buggy Springs Used beneath the Board