With the ordinary small telescope it is very difficult to keep the line of sight fixed upon any particular object. To meet the situation I constructed the

Fig. 1 Fig. 2

Fig. 1 Fig. 2

Made of a Camera Tripod device illustrated herewith. A circular piece of wood, B, 6 in. in diameter, is fastened to a common camera tripod, A, with a set screw, S. Corner irons, CC, are screwed to the circular piece. These corner irons are also screwed to, and supported in a vertical position by the wood standard D, which is 4 in. wide and of any desired height. To this standard is secured the wood shield-shaped piece E by the screw G upon which it turns. A semi-circular slit is cut in the piece G, through which passes the set screw S. The telescope is secured to the piece G by means of the pipe straps FF. Rubber bands are put around the telescope to prevent rubbing at the places where the straps enclose it.

The wood pieces were made of mahogany well rubbed with linseed oil to give a finish. The corner irons and set screws or bolts with thumb-nuts can be purchased at any hardware store. The pipe straps of different sizes can be obtained from a plumber's or gas and steam fitter's store. With this device, either a vertical or a horizontal motion may be secured, and, after bringing the desired object into the line of sight, the set screws will hold the telescope in position. Anyone owning a tripod can construct this device in three or four hours' time at a trifling cost. In Fig. 1 is shown the side view of the holder and stand, and Fig. 2 the front view.

It may be of interest to those owning telescopes without solar eyepieces to know that such an eyepiece can be obtained very cheaply by purchasing a pair of colored eyeglasses with very dark lenses and metal rims. Break off the frame, leaving the metal rims and nibs at each end. Place these over the eyepiece of the telescope and secure in place with rubber bands looped over the nibs and around the barrel of the instrument. --Contributed by R. A. Paine, Richmond, Va.