She placed it on her eyes and kissed it before opening it to read. "Well, since you have brought a letter from my sister, I shall show you the country and the home of the Daughter of the Orange and the Golden Citron, but on one condition, that when you have married her you will marry me and make her my slave-woman." To this he agreed.

Then the Div said: "Now my sons will be coming home, and if they see you it will be impossible to save your life." Thereupon she said a prayer and changed him into a skin rug and sat on it. No sooner had she done this than her sons came flying in one by one. "Mother, the smell of a human being is about." "My sons," answered she, "where could a human being be? It is seven years' journey hither from the places where men dwell."

Then they began to search about here, there, and everywhere, striking the door and striking the roof, and keeping up a terrible roaring in their hunt for the human being. Only after a thousand arguments and protestations and assurances did their mother succeed in quieting them. Then they cooked all the flesh they had brought home and ate and slept. When they awoke they went forth again to hunt for a new day's supplies.

Then the Div said a prayer and the King's Son was restored to his own shape. Next she said prayers over a piece of reed, a piece of glass, a needle, a knife, some salt, some charcoal, and some sea-foam, and gave them to him. Then she gave him instructions: "You will go by a certain road and come to a certain place which is a garden. When you reach the garden knock on the door and the gardener will open it. First, give a little money as a present to the gardener and go in, and on the bank of the stream which flows through the middle of the garden you will see an orange tree. Now give plenty of money to the gardener and buy all the fruit of that tree as it stands. Then pull the oranges one by one and cut them in halves with a knife and throw them into the water. But whichever of the oranges says: 'Ah!' when you go to cut it, is the one in which the Daughter of the Orange and the Golden Citron is hidden; put it safely under your arm and fly.

"For you must know that this Orange Princess is under the spell of all the Divs and the Perls, and they are all in love with her, and they will never cease pursuing you and trying to slay you so as to get her back again. Therefore you must fly with all speed, and when you see them close behind throw down the reed and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a reed-brake!' and on no account look behind. If they cross the reeds, throw down the glass and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a place of glass!'

And if they cross the glass, throw down the needle and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a needle grove!'

If they cross the needles, throw down the knife and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a place of knives!'

If they cross the knives, throw down the salt and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a salt marsh!'

If they cross the salt, throw down the charcoal and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a place of fire!' till at last, if they still pursue you, you must throw down the sea-foam and cry:

'O God, in the name of the Prophet Suleman, Let this desert, waste within waste and world upon world, Become a sea!' "

The King's Son did exactly as the Div had bidden him. No sooner had he thrown down the sea-foam than the world behind him became a mighty sea. Then the Divs saw that they could not pursue him further, but they caught sight of the piece of sea-foam floating in the midst of the great sea, and they thought it was a rock or mountain. They put their feet on it to cross over, and every one of them was drowned.

When the Prince saw that all the Divs had perished, he rendered thanks and praise to God, and fell down and kissed the earth and started forth. He travelled and travelled on till at last he came within two or three days' march of his own country. Then his heart could no longer endure in patience, and he peeled the orange.

Out of it stepped a maiden as beautiful as the moon on her fourteenth night, so fair that merely to look on her was a sin. Her hair poured down over her body from head to foot, so that it was a marvel to behold, but underneath she was naked and without clothes. Then he cried: "Alas! What shall I do; how can I travel with this maiden till I can find clothes for her?" Now there was a tree in that place and a spring of water, so the King's Son came to the Orange Princess and said: "Hide yourself in that tree and I shall go on into my own country and make arrangements for you, and I shall come back with clothes and servants and necessaries and take you to my home with pomp and circumstance." She agreed to this, and the Prince went his way.

There happened to be a house in the neighbourhood, and the mistress of the house had a negro slave-woman. She said to her: "Take these water-jars out to the stream, fill them, and bring them back." When the slave-woman came to the water's edge she saw a face reflected there, so beautiful that you would never tire of looking at it. The silly negress took it into her head that this was her own reflection, and cried: "By de grave of de mistress's fader - may it catch fire! Me am so beautiful as dis? Why den me work like one slave-girl?"