(BEECH-FERN.)

(2998.) P. poly pod ioides, Fée, Gen. Fil., 243.

Macoun & Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., ii., sect, iv., 197.

Polypodtum Phegopteris, Linn., Sp. Pl, 1550. Swartz, Syn. Fil., 40. Hook.,

Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 258. Provancher, Fl. Can., 713. Lawson, Can.

Nat., i., 269. Polypodium connectile, Michx., Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 271. Pursh, Fl. Am.

Sept., ii., 659. Phegopteris connectile, Watt, Can. Nat., iv., 363. Lawson, Fern Fl. Can.,

247.

Occurs in damp, especially rocky woods, and on hillsides, and is commonest in the Eastern Provinces. Common and generally distributed throughout Nova Scotia. (Ball.) Common in New Brunswick. (Fowler.) Common in Quebec. (D' Urban, Brunet, McCord, St. Cyr, etc.) Very luxuriant on the Island of Anticosti and shore of the Lower St. Lawrence, Que.; woods, at Brackley Point, Prince Edward Island; abundant around Lake Superior, Ont.; rather scarce along Lake Manitoba and the Porcupine Mountains, Man.; near the line of the Canadian Pacific By. in the valley of Beaver Creek, Selkirk Mountains, and in the Gold Range at Griffin Lake, B.C., both on stumps and on rocks along mountain torrents. (Macoun.) Prescott, Gren-ville Co., and Osgoode Station, Russell Co., Ont. (Billings.) Ottawa, and along the C. P. Ry. north of Lakes Huron and Superior, Ont. (Fletcher.) Near the sources of the Columbia on Portage River, Rocky Mountains, Lat. 52°. (Drummond.) Shaded, rocky places, Port Simpson, B.C. (Anderson.)

(2999.) P. hexagonoptera, Fée, Gen. Fil., 243.

Macoun & Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., ii., sect, iv., 198.

Polypodium hexagonopterum, Michx., Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 271. Pursh, Fl.

Am. Sept., ii., 659. Lawson, Can. Nat., i., 268. Hook. & Baker,

Syn. Fil, 309. Polypodium Phegopteris, var. majus, Hook., Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 258.

This species is found in rich, open woods, and, in south-western Ontario, seems to take the place of P. polypodioides, from which species it is sometimes difficult to separate it. Quebec, Que. (Sheppard.) Nun's Island, Montreal, Que., (Parsons.) Rare in Miriwin's Woods, near Prescott, Ont. (Billings.) Rocky woods, near Campbellford, Northumberland Co., and in thickets at Port Stanley, Elgin Co., Ont. (Macoun.) Rich woods near the Waterworks Reservoir, Toronto, and at London, St. Thomas, and Windsor, Ont. (Burgess.) Chippewa, Ont. (Maclagan.) Parry Sound, Ont. (Logie.)

(3000.) P. Dryopteris, Fée, Gen. Fil., 243.

Macoun & Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., ii., sect, iv., 198.

Polypodium Dryopteris, Linn., Sp. Pl., 1555. Swartz, Syn. Fil., 41. Hook., Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 259. Lawson, Can. Nat., i., 269. Provancher, Fl. Can., 713.

Polypodium calcareum, Pursh, Fl. Am. Sept., ii., 659 (not of Smith and Willdenow.)

Nephrodium, Dryopteris, Michx., Fl. Bor. - Am., ii., 270.

Common in rocky woodlands from Nova Scotia to British Columbia, and extending northward to the Arctic Circle. To be met with in most localities in Nova Scotia. (Ball.) Common in New Brunswick. (Fowler.) Common on Prince Edward Island, and along Lakes Manitoba and Winnipegoosis, and in the Riding, Duck, and Porcupine mountains, Man., also in the Rocky Mountains, British Columbia and Vancouver Island. (Macoun.) Abundant in Quebec. (Maclagan, D'Urban, Provancher, St. Cyr, etc.) Common in rocky parts of Ontario. (Billings, Macoun, Burgess, etc.) Along the C. P. Ry. north of Lakes Huron and Superior. (Fletcher.) At intervals from Lake Winnipeg to within fifty miles of Hudson Bay, and on Clearwater River, N. W. Ter. (J. M. Macoun.) Echimamish River to Oxford House, Keewatin. (JR. Bell.) Rocky Mountains and Great Bear Lake, Lat. 66°. (Hook., in Fl. Bor. - Am.) British Columbia. (Dawson.) Victoria and Port Simpson, B.C. (Anderson.)

Var. Robertianum, Dav., Suppl. Cat. Dav. Herb., 47.

P. calcarea, Fée, Gen. Fil., 243 - Macoun & Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., ii., sect, iv., 199.

Polypodium Robertianum, Hoff.; Moore, Nat. Pr. Brit. Ferns, t. vi. Law-son, Can. Nat., i., 270.

Polypodium Dryopteris, var. calcareum, Gr., Man., Ed. 2., 590.

Is distinguished from the type by its glandular stalks and fronds. Abundant on ledges of limestone about two miles up the left bank of the Beescie River, Island of Anticosti, Que. (Macoun.) Not rare in low-woods at the base of limestone cliffs, and in crevices of the cliffs themselves, at the mouth of the Temiscami River, Lake Mistassini, N. E. Ter. (J. M. Macoun.) Lake of the Woods, Man. (Dawson.) About one hundred miles north-east of Lake of the Woods, near Lonely Lake (Lac Seul), Ont. (R. Bell.)

(3001.) P. alpestris, Mett.,Fil. Hort. Lips., 83. Macoun & Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., ii., sect, iv., 200.

Burgess, Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., iv., sect. iv., 13.

Polypodium alpestre, Hoppe; Spreng. Syst. Veg., iv., par. ii., 320. Hook.

& Baker, Syn. Fil., 311. Aspidium alpestre, Swartz, Syn. Fil., 421. Athyrium alpestre, Nylander; Lawson, Fern Fl. Can., 238.

It has a strong general resemblance to Asplenium Filix-foemina, from which, however, it is distinguishable by the absence of indusia. Cascade Mountains, B.C., about Lat. 49°. (Lyall.) In wet places, at an altitude of 7000 feet, on the slopes below the glacier along Bear Creek at the summit of the Selkirk Mountains, near the line of the C. P. Ry., and also abundant under the cliffs, at a height of 6000 feet, near the summit of the Gold Range north of Griffin Lake, B.C. (Macoun.)