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Alpine Flowers And Gardens | by G. Flemwell



Switzerland probably owes nearly as much of its popularity to its flowers as it does to its mountains, and although in this regard we may find it difficult to dissociate the one from the other, it is not impossible, nor, indeed, unreasonable. There is a season when the mountains are devoid of flowers and yet remain popular. But the popularity which surrounds the Alps in winter is not, and probably never can be, the wide popularity which surrounds them in spring, summer, and early autumn...

TitleAlpine Flowers And Gardens
AuthorG. Flemwell
PublisherA. & C. Black
Year1909
Copyright1909, A. & C. Black
AmazonAlpine flowers and gardens painted and described

Painted And Described By G. Flemwell

A. & C. Black 4, 5 & 6 Soho Square, London

To My Mother.

Alpine Garden (La Linnea) At Bourg St. Pierre, In August

Alpine Garden (La Linnea) At Bourg St. Pierre, In August.

-Preface
'Un volume sur la flore alpine, dira-t-on, il en existe beaucoup deja, et il y a, dans ce domaine, surproduction. Eh bien, oui, en existe , mais je ne rien qui s'approche du travail que Mr. Flemwell a...
-Chapter I. The Rival Seasons
Switzerland probably owes nearly as much of its popularity to its flowers as it does to its mountains, and although in this regard we may find it difficult to dissociate the one from the other, it is ...
-Chapter II. Spring In The Alps
If comparisons are often odious, it is because they often serve to very small purpose, and often lead to much injustice. Prejudice usually plays a conspicuous part in them; predilections already exist...
-Spring In The Alps. Part 2
The feast opens with gentle slope rising above slope, clothed with close, moss-like grass of a brilliance such as only the Alps can produce, and strewn with a profusion of Bell-Gentian, known casually...
-Spring In The Alps. Part 3
But what a sin it seems to be walking on these flowers as we are now doing! In default, however, of a path, and in presence of such profusion, there is no other way of proceeding; we are constrained, ...
-Chapter III. The Crocus, And Some Dreaming
The dreamer's season par excellence is the spring. It is then that his dreams arise as irresistibly as the flowers - and, in large measure, because of the flowers. From time immemorial spring, and the...
-Chapter IV. Where Do 'Alpines' Begin?
Where should the line for Alpine plants be drawn? The question is not always an easy one to answer. So much depends upon the nature and situation of the ground, as well as upon the nature and history ...
-Where Do 'Alpines' Begin?. Continued
There is a curious fact about the Alpine wanderings of the Nettle which is worthy of notice. Although it is ready to sting him upon the slightest provocation, this Nettle appears really amicably dispo...
-Chapter V. Certain Characteristics Of Alpine Plants
That which is bound to strike the observer at once about Alpine plants is the large size and profusion of their flowers in comparison with the dimensions of the plants themselves. All about them, exce...
-Certain Characteristics Of Alpine Plants. Continued
Gentiana Kochiana, G. Verna, And Silene Acaulis At The Col De La Forclaz, Above Martigny, In The Rhone Valley. Early In June. But, fascinating as this subject is, and deserving as it is of deep an...
-Chapter VI. Summer In The Alps
The irresponsible harmony of a hundred cow-bells; a like but thinner music from a hundred head of goats; the sharp, strident clacking of the coachmen's whips as diligence and carriage wend their way u...
-Summer In The Alps. Part 2
Rose-pink takes no second place to sky-blue in human esteem. Of all colours, pink - the pink of health, of life, and of perfection - makes perhaps the strongest appeal; and the very natural inclinatio...
-Summer In The Alps. Part 3
But here we are, at the base of the steeper slopes mounting to the Col. We had best leave the path, though it follow an easier gradient; for, by ascending direct, we shall see more of the flowers. We ...
-Summer In The Alps. Part 4
Having reached the shoulder at which we were aiming, we shall now have to turn straight down its northern side - down into this amphitheatre of rugged cliffs. And here the nature of the ground is enti...
-Summer In The Alps. Part 5
But we must be moving on; the first tints of sunset are already touching the snow and ice on yonder glacier, and 'Darker grows the valley, more and more forgetting.' As we descend the sheltered slope...
-Chapter VII. Concerning Some Spring And Summer Alpines
It is probably safe to say that every manifestation of Beauty can claim its victims. Certain it is that Beauty, as represented by Alpine flowers, can make such claim and rank it high. In spite of all ...
-Concerning Some Spring And Summer Alpines. Continued
But the Mountain Cudweed cannot pretend to be purely and simply an Alpine; although it is found up to about 8,500 feet on wellnigh every mountain, it is common in the plains. There is, however, an Alp...
-Chapter VIII. Autumn In The Alps
'Hear ye no sound of sobbing in the air V The poetic pessimist is usually rampant at this season. With long face and moist eye he sighs of 'the ah-ness of things,' declares that 'in my heart is grief,...
-Autumn In The Alps. Continued
Now that the cattle and the goats have moved lower down towards their winter quarters, many a plant that had its bloom-spike eaten off earlier in the year tries its best at this season to recover lost...
-Chapter IX. On The Abuse And Protection Of Alpines
Hearing for the first time that there are gardens in the Alps, our irresistible impulse is to exclaim, 'Of course there are! the Alps are one vast and glorious garden!' And when at length we fully rea...
-On The Abuse And Protection Of Alpines. Part 2
It is well, however, to preface this opinion with the word 'possibly': for who, with the past as precedent, shall dare to say that the philosophy of even the wisest can so encompass this question as t...
-On The Abuse And Protection Of Alpines. Part 3
The Society and its offshoots, the gardens, have also dealt most effectively with the unthinking habits of the peasant, who sought to enrich himself by selling rudely uprooted rarities on the markets ...
-On The Abuse And Protection Of Alpines. Part 4
In certain ways the tourist uprooter is the more difficult and delicate element to deal with in the whole problem; but the Society has, by the 'sweet reasonableness' of its moral persuasion, arrived a...
-Chapter X. In An Alpine Garden
A visit to an Alpine garden is like a visit to an Orchid-house: it is a unique experience. Our sensations are quite other than when visiting a Herbaceous border. For of all plants, Alpines and Orchids...
-In An Alpine Garden. Part 2
Careless as we generally are, it now and again happens that we try to outdo Nature in carefulness. When we sow flower-seed, we choose a likely spot and watch it (blaming our seedsman if the seed shoul...
-In An Alpine Garden. Part 3
The Yellow Gentian At The End Of August, With The Col De Balme And Mont Blanc In The Distance. There is also admirable occasion for the botanist in these gardens: an enlarging opportunity which hi...
-Chapter XI. Some Gardens In The Alps
Gardens are becoming more and more numerous in the Alps; almost every year lengthens the list. For present purposes, however, we will content ourselves with visiting three only - three of the oldest a...
-The Thomasia (Limestone; Altitude About 3,800 Ft.)
An easy walk of some three and a half hours from Bex, in the Rhone Valley, this garden is admirably situated at Pont de Nant amid sheltered, park-like pastures above Les Plans and at the foot of the g...
-The Rambertia (Limestone; Altitude About 6,900 Ft.)
Here, at the summit of the Rochers de Naye, above Montreux, is a garden which is one of the highest and most romantically situated in Europe. Laid out, for the most part, upon the southern face of a p...
-The Linnea (Granite; Altitude About 5,300 Ft.)
Just outside, and dominating the quaint little village of Bourg St. Pierre - the last village upon the road to the Grand St. Bernard - stands the oldest of the gardens in the Swiss Alps: La Linnea. Fo...
-Other Alpine Books
Uniform With This Volume Each Containing Full-Page Illustrations In Colour - The Alps By A. D. M'cormick And Sir Martin Conway Containing 62 Full-Page Illustrations Reproduced In The Colours Of The O...









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