Lop Grass (Bromus Racemosus, L.)

The habitat of this plant is fields and waste places. The habit is erect. The stem is erect and rigid. The leaves are rigid, fringed with hairs, and otherwise, as the sheaths, smooth, or but slightly hairy. The panicle is long, simple, erect, narrow, with branches with 3-5 divisions. The egg-shaped spikelets are flattened, the flowering glumes overlapping in fruit, rough, broadest above the middle, the lower empty glume is halfway to the top of the fourth floret. The awn is slender, as long as the flowering glume. The plant is 2-3 ft. in height, flowering in June and July, being a herbaceous biennial.

Brome Grass (Bromus Commutatus, Schrad.)

The habitat of this plant is fields and waste places. The habit is erect. The leaves and sheaths are hairy. The plant is stouter than the last. The panicle is compound, drooping, the spikelets shorter, the margins of the falling flowering glumes rounded at the broadest part. The flower-stalks are as long as or longer than the spikelets. The latter are lance-shaped, oblong. The sides of the lower palea are uniformly rounded at the side. The top of the upper glume is halfway to the top of the fourth flower. The plant is 1-3 ft. in height. It flowers in June and July, and is a herbaceous biennial.

Couch Grass, Tare (Agropyron Repens, Beauv.)

The habitat of this grass is fields, waste places, cultivated fields, hedgerows, and ditches, etc. The rootstock is long and creeping. The stem is prostrate and then ascending, hollow, smooth. The leaves have inrolled margins at first, then flat, rough above, or hair), ribbed. The sheaths are round, the ligules very short. The spike is long, close, the rachis not brittle, smooth or downy, rigid, erect or bent. The spikelets are rigid, with 5-7 florets, rough on the keel, the glumes blunt, 5-7 ribbed, the flowering glumes with long points or awned. There are 3 stamens. The ovary is hairy above. The feathery stigmas are nearly stalkless and feathery. The fruit is grooved and adheres to the palea as a rule. The plant is 1-3 ft. in height, or more. It is in flower from June to August. It is a herbaceous perennial.

Meadow Barley (Hordeum Pratense, Huds.)

The habitat of this grass is damp or wet meadows, and it is frequent in some districts near the sea. The habit is erect and grass-like. The rootstock is creeping. The stem is slender, round, rough above. The leaves are narrow, flat, rolled inwards at length, rough above, hairy below (the narrow sheaths are the same), and the ligule is very short. The spike is flattened, linear, yellow-green, erect. The lateral spikelets are flowerless or male, the central bisexual. All the glumes are bristle-like and rough, not fringed with hairs (as in the Common Wall Barley). The glumes in the lateral flowers are shorter. The awns are spreading. The two nearly stalkless stigmas are feathery. The plant is 1-2 ft. in height. It flowers in June and July, and is a herbaceous perennial.