Pill-Headed Sedge (Carex Pilulifera, L.)

The habitat of this plant is heaths, wet heaths, woods, and moors. The plant has the sedge habit. The stems are 3-angled, roughish, long, slender, prostrate at length. The rootstock is tufted. The roots are fibrous. There are no stolons. The leaves form a rosette as a rule, and are broad, short, flat, keeled. The 2-3 fertile spikelets are close, round, stalkless. The bracts are small and awl-like. The male spikes are slender, the female are nearly round. The glumes are brown, spreading, with a green midrib with brown edges, or pale. The fruit is opaque, scarcely 3-angled. The nut is brown, and more or less rounded, with a short, notched beak. The plant is 4-15 in. high, flowering in June and July, and is a herbaceous perennial.

Heath Sedge (Carex Ericetoruvi, Poll.)

The habitat of this sedge is dry places, chalk banks. The plant has the sedge habit. The rootstock is branched, creeping, and tufted. The stems are short, curved, stiff, smooth, 3-angled. The leaves are broad, keeled, bent-back. The bract is glu-maceous, hardly sheathing. The fertile spikelets are few, 1-3, forming a head, 6-10-flowered, small, stalkless, egg-shaped, close. The glume is brown, broadly inversely egg-shaped, blunt, fringed with hairs, the midrib not reaching the top, with membranous margins. The fruit is inversely egg-shaped, downy, as long as the glume, opaque, short. The beak is blunt, entire. The nut is stalkless, inversely egg-shaped, 3-sided, pale, with no terminal disk. The plant is 2-6 in. high, flowering in May to June, and is a herbaceous perennial.

Carex frigida, Sadl. non All. (= C. Sadleri, Linton = C. alpina, Drej.). - The habitat of this species is wet turf, wet places on Scotch mountains. The habit is the usual sedge habit. The stem is smooth, triangular. The leaves are broad, at first parallel-sided. The bracts are sheathing, leafy. The glumes are dark-brown, acute, cylindrical, long-stalked. The fertile spikes are spindle-shaped, the upper stalkless, the lower drooping at length, long-stalked. There are 1-2 male spikes. The fruit is smooth, lance-shaped, 3-sided, narrowed into a short beak, divided into two. The nut is egg-shaped, 3-angled. The plant is 1-1J ft. in height, flowering in August, and is a herbaceous perennial.

Yellow Sedge (Carex Flava, L.)

This is a native plant, found in heaths, bogs, marshes, and wet places. The Yellow Sedge has the usual sedge habit. The rootstock is tufted. There are no stolons. The stems are curved, with acute angles, smooth, 3-angled. The leaves are broad, flat, mainly radical, bent-back, not so long as the stem. The sheaths are short. The bracts are leafy, long. The fertile spikelets are roundish ovate, close. The male are spindle-shaped, the female spreading. The fruit is ovate, ribbed, smooth, inflated, spreading, largerthan the glumes. The beak is long, bent downwards. The nut is inversely ovoid, short, 3-angled, with acute angles, olive-brown. The plant is 3-18 in. high, flowering between May and July, and is a herbaceous perennial.

Carex Cederi, Retz

The habitat of this species is bogs, lake margins, and wet places. The plant has the sedge habit. The plant is smaller than the last, and the beak is rough and more straight. The stem is 3-angled, smooth. The fertile spikes are roundish to ovate, close, the lowest having an included stalk. The bracts are leafy with a short sheath. The glumes are blunt-pointed. The fruit is sub-globose, inflated, ribbed, smooth, suddenly narrowed into an erect or bent-down beak, narrow and rough at the margin. The nut is inversely ovoid, 3-angled, dotted. The plant is 2-4 in. high, flowering between May and July, and is a herbaceous perennial.