Stinking Goosefoot (Chenopodium Vulvaria, L. = C. Olidum, Curt.)

The habitat of this plant is roadsides, and dry waste places near houses. It is possibly native on shores and pebbly beaches in the S. of England and Guernsey. The habit is erect or ascending. The plant is mealy, covered with a greasy powder, and foetid, spreading. The branches are opposite, spreading. The leaves are rhombic, ovate, triangular, mealy, entire, stalked, acute, greyish-green. The leaf-stalk is as long as the leaves, or less. The flowers are in small, dense, leafless spikes, which are terminal and axillary. The outer perianth-segments are not keeled, and cover the utricle. The parts of the flower are in fives. The seeds are black, shining, rough, with small dots. The plant is 6-18 in. high, flowering from July to September, and is a herbaceous annual.

Allseed Goosefoot (Chenopodium Polyspermum, L.)

The habitat of this plant is cultivated ground and manure heaps, damp waste places, and it may be native in damp woods in the S. of England. The habit is erect or ascending-. The plant is bluish-green. The stems are branched, numerous, spreading, leafy. The leaves are entire, ovate, elliptic, blunt or acute, shortly stalked, membranous. The flowers are very small, in long, axillary, and terminal, leafless racemes, cyme-like, simple or branched, the branches slender and spreading. The outer perianth-segments are not keeled, not so long as the utricle. The seeds are very small, dark-brown, shining, rough, minutely-dotted, blunt-bordered. The plant is 6-24 in. high, flowering from July to September, and is a herbaceous annual.

Chenopodium Opulifolium, Schrad

The habitat of this plant is roadsides, waste ground. It has affinity with C. album. The leaves are broadly rhomboidal, ovate, triangular, more or less 3-lobed, short, unequally toothed, blunt, coarsely and unevenly scalloped, toothed, the teeth long and blunt-pointed. The stem-leaves are short and very blunt. The leaf-stalks are long and slender. The inflorescence is bluish-green. The plant is 1-3 ft. high, flowering in August and September, and is a herbaceous annual.

Fig-Leaved Goosefoot (Chenopodium Ficifolium, Sni. = Ch. Serotinutn, L.)

The habitat of this plant is waste places, rich soil, roadsides, near villages, cultivated ground. The habit is erect. The plant is mealy, limp. It resembles C. album. The leaves are blunt. They are unequally 3-lobed, spear-shaped, oblong, lance-shaped, the middle lobe the longest, wedge-shaped, ascending, wavy, toothed, blunt. The upper leaves are entire, linear, lance-shaped, the basal lobes ascending. The flowers are in a leafless inflorescence, or in a spike, or cymose raceme, leafy only below, with erect branches. The perianth almost covers the utricle. The seeds are minutely pitted, dotted, not keeled, shining, blunt. The plant is 1-3 ft. high, and flowers from July to September, being a herbaceous annual.

Upright Goosefoot (Chenopodium Urbicum, L.)

The habitat of this plant is waste places. It has not been recorded from native habitats. The habit is erect. There is little meal on this plant. The stem has alternate bands of green and white, and is stout, with few branches. The leaves may be as broad as long, triangular, toothed, the teeth short, triangular, wavy, or nearly entire below, narrowed into the leaf-stalk, which is shorter, winged above. The lateral veins are spreading. The flowers are in a long, erect, simple or compound dense spike, nearly leafless above, axillary or terminal. The perianth - segments are not keeled, and do not cover the utricle, being broadly membranous. The seeds are rough, blunt-bordered. The plant is 1-3 ft. high, and flowers in August and September, being a herbaceous annual.