Style

the shaft which, in most flowers, is interposed between the stigma and ovary.

Sub

in composition, somewhat; implying a near approach to the condition indicated by the term with which it is joined: thus, sub-rotund is roundish.

Subulate

awl-shaped.

Succulent

having abundant cellular tissue, replete with juices.

Suckers

tubercular processes on the stems of certain flowering parasites, by which they imbibe nourishment from the plants to which they attach themselves.

Superior

placed above another organ; applied especially to indicate the position of the ovary with respect to the calyx.

Sioord-shaped

straight and flat, with the point acute.

Symmetrical

when the parts of one series of organs agree with those of another in number, as in a flower which has five sepals, five petals, five or ten stamens, etc.

Syncarpous

bearing fruit composed of cohering carpels.

Syngenesious

having the stamens coherent by their anthers.

Tapering

gradually diminishing in diameter.

Tendril

a twisting, thread-like por-cess, forming a modified condition of some appendage to the axis of vegetation.

Terete

nearly cylindrical, but somewhat tapering into a very elongated cone.

Terminal

situated at the extremity of some part.

Ternate

Ternary, arranged by threes about the same part.

Tetradynamous

having six stamens, four longer than the other two.

Thalamiflores

a group of dicotyledons, in which the several petals are distinct from the sepals, and the stamens are hypogynous.

Thorn

the same as spine.

Tetramerous

having the parts in fours or multiples of four.

Tooth

a small projection of the margin of some laminated part.

Toothed

furnished with teeth.

Triadelphous

having the stamens collected into three distinct sets or bundles.

Triandrous

having three stamens.

Triangular,a plane surface approaching a triangle in shape.

Trichotomous

subdivided, with the divisions in threes.

Tricoccous

composed of three cocci.

Trifid

divided into three subordinate parts, the incisions extending about half-way towards the base.

Trifoliate

Trifoliolate, having the leaflets disposed in threes at the extremities of their petioles.

Trigonous

triangular.

Tripartite

subdivided into three parts, much beyond the middle or nearly to the base.

Trimerous

having the parts in threes or multiples of three.

Tripetalous

consisting of three petals.

Triternate

having the petiole twice branched in a ternate manner, each partial petiole bearing three leaflets.